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2

Commercial eggnog virtually ALWAYS has nutmeg in it, so you are just adding to that. While it's easy to grab the stuff, it's worth making your own eggnog if you'd like to raise your 'nog experience several notches. I can't imagine grinding nutmeg at home - that would take a heck of a grinder, and it would be hard to do less than a whole nutmeg at a time, ...


3

Add it if you like! As mentioned in the comments, eggnog usually already has nutmeg in it, so when you say you say you can't taste anything other than nog, in reality you're probably tasting eggnog including nutmeg! If what you add is pre-ground, the flavor probably isn't terribly strong. And even with freshly grated nutmeg, you're probably only adding a ...


2

Toasting spices with oil will make it a "Tadka" that is added to Dal or vegetable to make them spicy,on the other hand dry roating the spices is generally done to bring out the aroma, the spices agr generally powdered right after dry roasting them to use in small quantities


-2

Stuff with black pudding or haggis, wrap in parchment first, then tin foil, bake for 1 hour at 190c.


1

Depends on the oil, when we infuse like to think of it as steeping not boiling or heating to the point of just below the smoke point as the spices will cook and not infuse, some will also become bitter. I also suggest you put your chilis in all at once or toward the end of the infusion process if you are layering the flavor or want a less intense flavor. ...


0

My Theory: Garam Masala is often added close to the end of cooking, and will refresh some of the aromatic compounds which will have gotten mostly cooked out of the spices in a sauce that had to simmer or boil for an extended period of time. Also, whole or ground spices added at the beginning of cooking will be exposed to frying heat, whereas GM is typically ...


0

Let me answer your question. I HAVE recreated the heat and the tang of this sauce. The heat is cayenne pepper powder. The tang is vinegar. Period. Add each and jeep tasting till you get it right. Don't forget to add 1/2 tsp. sugar as well to balance the sauce.


1

Kraft Tangy Italian can be replicated using their list of ingredients. Tomato paste and sauce (find your preference in amounts, I like more sauce (or diced or crushed tomatoes) with a tablespoon of paste) , onion powder, garlic powder, celery powder (or celery seeds), sugar (small quantity a must), I don't use the Soy protein, Mono Glu or Food starch...those ...


-1

While they don't taste exactly the same, I would use the anise seed before I'd drive to the store to get fennel seed, unless it was a major component of the dish, which I imagine is unlikely in an italian recipe.


3

I don't think that this would be unsafe, as you do see unpeeled garlic used in some applications, but it wouldn't be particularly pleasant and you probably wouldn't end up with a great paste. Garlic skins can be pretty tough and woody depending on the particular bulb; you'd probably end up with hard, fibrous bits in your paste. If you're willing to accept ...


0

If you use a garlic press such as this one, you don't have to peel the garlic (though you'll have less waste if you do).


-3

I am going to guess that people who think anise and fennel are interchangable don't like black licorice. That supposition is based on the idea that they taste the same. They are distinctly different and I for one dislike the sweet after taste of anise that has creeped into almost all brands of italian sausage. Fennel is the taste of Italian sausage for most ...



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