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2

Put them in the microwave for about 30 seconds, they become oily, put in your spices and mix well, hey presto the seasoning sticks, let them cool!


1

Are you cooking the celery, carrots and onions before you add them to the soup? As @Stephie says, you've got a classic mirepoix in those ingredients. I like to chop them pretty finely (though a food processor gives results that are much too fine, like a paste; don't use one for this) and cook them together in a tablespoon of olive oil until the onions are ...


0

Powdered soup mix can be a little light on flavors. Fortunately, a few common spices make for great additives to your soup. Here's a few things you can try. Bay Leaf: A tried and true flavor additive to any soup. Add one or two for a little extra flavor. Bullion Cube: Sometimes the broth doesn't have quite enough flavor, and adding a proper bullion ...


7

This may not be your issue, but the number one problem that cooks have is in the area of salt. Soup needs a lot of salt unfortunately or it tastes bleh and insipid.


2

I'm going out on a limb here and assume that using heavy cream might have dulled the percieved intensity of the flavours. So to add more "omph" you should add more of what is already in there. As the soup is done, you can't use anything that requires a long cooking time because you'd be turning everythinhg to mush. Granted, you could cut more vegies, ...


0

I'd add my two cents on RawSpiceBar- they are new on the scene but do a really good job of offering hard to find spices and spice blends in small quantities which is oftentimes just what I'm looking for. The quality has been great, in my experience. Worth checking out: www.rawspicebar.com


1

In India, when we make lentils we finish it by tempering with cumin or black mustard seeds. Infact these two are used interchangeably with many other dishes and gives the right kind of flavour required for any such dishes. Incase you don't have even that on hand, flavour your dish with othe spices like chilli powder and garam masala and it should turn out ...


1

Chili powder and things like chili or taco spice mixes will normally have cumin as an ingredient. Of course they have other ingredients as well, but they might work well in a lentil soup.


1

The problem is that a lot of substitutions are based on what you have on hand. For instance, I have both liquid smoke and smoked paprika, both of which would add that smoky quality that people associate with cumin. We also need to consider what other ingredients are going into the dish. I have spice blends that contain cumin in varying degrees (garam ...


1

My first instinct was curry powder and perhaps some garam masala. Not really like cumin, but also a classic combination with lentils and onions - an indian twist, so to speak. (Amp up the heat with chili and top with a dollop of yoghurt, if you like.)


1

Coriander might give you the right general sort of flavor, but I think it's darker and heavier than cumin (I'm struggling to describe this well, obviously). Perhaps mixed with paprika to brighten it up a little? If you've got some, give it a sniff and see; it might work for the desperation, if nothing else.


3

The world record holder is currently the Carolina Reaper according to Guinness (as of AUG 2013). This pepper began its family tree as a crossbreed between a Ghost Chili pepper and a Red Habanero. The LA Times reports that the hottest Reaper has been clocked at 2.2 Million Scoville units. That's higher than some commercial pepper spray products. They go on ...


13

I think it's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, and nutmeg is muscade in French and Muskat in German. It's also something that'd taste fine in the dishes she uses it in.


18

It's nutmeg. The author of that blog is from Switzerland, so I imagine that term is used there, but I had never heard used culinarily until now. I Googled "Grated Musk", and still had to look around to be sure. Thanks for teaching me something. EDIT As of an hour after the question was posted: Click the "Grated Musk" link now! This question is now the top ...


4

Most basic mills with steel grinders will be OK What breaks them are Overly aggressive grinding; just grind gently and your mill will last much longer Keep them dry; do not use a pepper grinder over a steaming pot. Grind pepper into a bowl or plate, and then pour into pot Old peppercorns; as they age and dry, they get tougher to grind, and wear most mills ...


0

I realise that this doesn't directly answer your question, but perhaps you could also consider using a mortar and pestle? While this may be less convenient, they're much harder to break than any pepper mill.


0

Americas Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has thoroughly tested pepper mills. If you can come up $5, you can get the winner from Amazon. The big winner winner is: The Amazon page is here The highest rated mill under $35 is this one: That Amazon page is here.


0

Cinnamon Extract (McCormick makes one) or cinnamon essential oil would be your best bet, in my opinion. Cinnamon essential oil is going to be much stronger and, if you choose to use an essential oil, you need to be VERY CAUTIOUS. The essential oil industry is barely regulated and, from what I've read, a product only has to contain 5% essential oil to be ...


0

Black cardamom is used only in meat based gravies and cannot be used in sweet dishes. Green cardamom can be used in both. You might want to look up this page for black cardamom: http://www.mangalorespice.com/Products/Spices--Dry-Fruits-Spices/M-Spice/Black-Cardamom/pid-3748657.aspx Check this page for green cardamom: ...


6

The nori that you buy as sheets is usually a different species than that of the form prepared as aonori. The form that you buy in sheets is, additionally, typically roasted, which changes the flavor. Aonori is usually of the genus Monostroma or Enteromorpha. Toasted nori for sushi is usually of the genus Porphyra. Because of those two details, I don't ...


4

Yeast extract contains a high content of glutamic acid, which, together with salt, forms MSG - hence the Umami taste. It's a flavour enhancer. As MSG has been the focus of many health / nutrition scares and blamed for "everything" from cancer to obesity, using yeast extract allows a manufacturer to avoid writing "MSG" and still have it in the food. -> Even ...


5

Yeast extracts provide umami, so it's a flavor enhancer. In the burger joint context, I imagine you might think it makes things taste a bit more meaty. The most famous yeast products are things like marmite and vegemite, but it doesn't have to be that intense. And since it's pretty easy to produce and can be dried into a powder, it's a common ingredient. ...


0

Black stone flower is a lesser known spice from India. It is an essential ingredient in South Indian Chettinad cuisine. Known as Dagad Phool in Hindi and Kalpasi in Tamil, Black stone flower transforms a dish with its unique flavour. You can read more about it here: ...


2

I have a simple answer that I think is ideal. Go to a store such as Whole Food's Whole Body or use Amazon and look for the herbal extract section. I happen to use a cinnamon extract from Herb Pharm that costs around $12 (on Amazon - Whole Body is a bit more). As you can imagine, this is a pure, organic extract of some of the best real cinnamon available. ...


7

I actually dealt with a very similar problem when I decided it would be nice to have coffee with a cinnamon taste - and of course it is! But I didn't want to buy a flavor syrup, and I had a ton of ground cinnamon available. I eventually settled on adding even just a little bit (less than a teaspoon) of ground cinnamon to the bottom of a coffee filter before ...


40

Cinnamon is the bark of a tree. It is either sold as rolled strips of bark (=cinnamon sticks) or ground. It will not dissolve, neither in water nor in alcohol. What you want to do is basically the same as was done commercially with the vanilla extract you are already using: Extract the taste, then discard the bark itself. Alcohol is a good choice for ...


12

I don't think it will ever dissolve in an edible solution. However it will readily infuse to both water and alcohol. So instead of trying to retain the cinnamon itself in the solution, just infuse it. Once the flavor has made it's way into the alcohol or water then sieve through a fine mesh. You'd be better off doing this with cinnamon sticks as they are ...


2

No, ground cinnamon won't dissolve in a cocktail like that. I'd use a bit of syrup, extract or cinnamon liqueur instead, perhaps Goldschläger, and plop in a (reusable) cinnamon stick as a garnish.



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