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39

In general, it is a good idea to go light on spices when trying a new recipe, if you're not intimately familiar with the flavor and spice combinations in question. It's a great deal easier to add spice later than it is to mask it once you've added too much. Assuming you are reading this because you didn't do that, and have now ended up with a sauce that's ...


26

The chemical responsible for "the burn" is Capsaicin. The main reason you and everyone else has trouble with the lingering burning sensation is that it's not water soluble (which means it doesn't dissolve in water). So, flooding your mouth with water-based liquids doesn't loosen up those Capsaicin molecules on your tongue and throat. Like @Iuls says, the ...


24

Well, that depends on the individual Thai dish or Indian dish and how it was cooked, of course. But I understand what you're talking about. However, the difference in heat sensations is not due to the kind of pepper employed. It's all about fat, really. Frequently Thai dishes are made with fresh peppers, and have a lot of acid and salt in them (from ...


17

There's nothing you can put into the food that will neutralize the spice after you eat it. The only way to avoid the infamous "ring of fire" is to add less spice to begin with. One way you can do this is by removing the seeds. Some of the heat from chilis comes from the seeds, however it doesn't all get extracted from the cooking. After you eat the chili the ...


15

Cream usually takes the edge off of spiciness, but it depends on the type of spice, and obviously on whether you can add anything creamy to the dish. For Thai food (for example) if you request that the curry be mild, they'll just dump in some more coconut milk.


15

Let a hot pepper (jalapeño or habañero, perhaps) soak in your liquid for however long it takes to achieve the desired hotness.


14

Dilute heavily by using a very small portion of peppers per dish Allow cooking time for the pepper flavor to permeate the dish before adding more. It's not like black pepper where the taste spreads instantly. Remove the seeds and membranes holding them, as this reduces spiciness considerably Cut peppers very finely or puree so there aren't any large pieces ...


12

Capsaicin isn't actually stored in the seeds: It's in the membrane surrounding them. It's a pretty useless distinction, though, since it's pretty much impossible to remove the membrane without removing the seeds as well, and even if you could... why would you want to? Either way, unless you're talking about dried peppers the seeds don't pack that much ...


11

In my book, this is pretty trivial. Wasabi is absolutely a spice - it's something with a very specific flavor, derived from a plant, that can be used in fairly small quantities to add flavor to something. It's not spicy (spicy hot, piquant) in the normal sense, though. It doesn't contain capsaicin. It is hot in some sense: it contains allyl isothiocyanate, ...


10

The only way to test for capsaicin besides tasting is chemical testing, namely liquid chromatography. Problem is, the same kind of chili can be quite different in heat, even on the same bush it can be quite different from my experience. No idea why, though. Here is one tip on how to check the heat of a chili without actually eating part of it, but still ...


10

You need something with fat or alcohol. The burning is caused by capsaicin, a molecule found in peppers, which is not water-soluble. If you go for the alcohol, you'll need something with higher percentage, not a beer, and it might result in more burning. It is easier to drink whole milk, especially because you might need lots of the drink if it is too ...


9

One doesn't generally marinate baked chicken wings because that runs counter to the goal of getting them crispy. I know that a lot of recipes tell you to do it, but while those recipes might result in good flavour, they'll also result in a pretty awful texture. Wings need to be baked with as little moisture as possible so they don't get soggy, and then ...


9

Jerky can be rehydrated. Soak it in liquid, the way you would mushrooms, until it becomes somewhat plump. It will remain a little chewy and keep a lot of its flavor. Chop it up and cook it into a stew. It will give a unique flavor and texture and the stew will dilute the spiciness- hopefully to a manageable level. Look for recipes for "backpacker's stew" ...


9

If you wish to explore adding spiciness to a dish, there are two primary methods for increasing the heat: additive and reductive. The one you choose will depend on the dish and what you are trying to get out of it. For something like a simple oil and pasta dish, the latter may be preferable, whereas with something like a three meat chili the former may be ...


8

When something's too hot (say curry or chili) we usually take raita as an additional garnish. Raita - yoghurt with herbs, spices and vegetables - is good at reducing heat, for example raita like this: yoghurt with sliced or chopped cucumber and a mixture of herbs as you like (parsley, dill, coriander, etc).


8

The hottest part of any chilli is the membrane the holds the seeds (contrary to popular belief that says it's the seeds themselves). If you remove this, you remove a lot of the heat. So if you want to try using ghost chilli, I'd suggest A) removing the seeds and membrane and B) chopping finely, then adding a little at a time to your dish, tasting after each ...


8

What is the world's hottest pepper? According to the Scovile Scale the hottest pepper is Bhut Jolokia. The one you are currently growing Scovile Scale Visualized What is a naga jolokia, and where does it stand in comparison to the other "contender" peppers? Bhut Jolokia or Naga Jologia According to some sources, they indicate that Bhut and ...


8

Each variety of chile has a subtly different flavor, but generally the kind to use is determined by how spicy you want the dish to be; spicier dishes need hotter peppers, otherwise you end up with a dish dominated by the peppers. For this reason, most people sort chiles by their spiciness, measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU). The exact same papers can be ...


7

The original Buffalo Wings are made with Frank's RedHot Sauce. The original recipe is simply equal parts melted butter and hot sauce. However, you truly can use just about whatever hot sauce you want in even greater ratios if you want more kick. There are also some distributors that specialize in spicy wing sauces. I recommend Defcon 2 if you are ...


7

The microwave caused heat which released oils from the coppa's spice blend, including capsaicin.


7

Full fat milk soothes the burn.


7

Scotch bonnet is very similar, if they're available.


7

I just came back from a local chili festival where I was able to taste the ghost chili for the first time. My favorite by far was a dark chocolate and toffee brittle with ghost chili. You can absolutely taste the difference between the ghost chili and habanero. I was surprised at how different the flavors are, but folks who aren't used to using different ...


7

According the Scoville Scale the peppers you mention (the Bhut Jolokia chili pepper) are ranked with the hottest of the peppers, albeit in a 'wide range' (855,000–1,463,700 Scoville heat units). The Scoville explanation on Wikipedia (linked above) does not include "naga jolokia" but does include "Naga Viper" and "Bhut Jolokia". It is likely that "Naga ...


7

I think the issue is primarily linguistic, but there may also be a mismatch between your experience of Japanese food and the average Japanese experience of Japanese food. Let's start with the experience itself. Wasabi is generally used in moderation in Japanese cuisine, and when real, fresh wasabi is used, instead of the mustard/western horseradish mix ...


7

Have you ever eaten something so hot it made you cry and felt like it'd never stop burning? Given what you've said you've tried, this thing is probably 10-100x as hot as the kind of pepper that would do that to you. Please be careful. In any case, pretty much the sole point of a pepper like this is to try to be the hottest thing in the world. The amount of ...


6

Hmm, I'd look for pure Capsaicin if all you want is the heat. It's colorless/odorless so could work, but I'm not sure where you can find it. I've heard of white, hot sauces which may work for you, here is an example


6

Depending where you live it can be hard to get hold of useful Szechuan pepper. What you want is just the outer shell of fruit, not the contents Many governments force importers from China to use high heat to sterilise these on import, and most of the active ingredients seems to get whacked during this process Find the most "Chinese" shop you can, and buy ...


6

Very few peppers have both the intense fruitiness and the extreme heat level of a habanero. One option might be to use a combination of dried ancho chilis for their fruitiness, and a fresh hot chili of your choice for the spice level. Thai bird chilis, for example, are quite hot.


6

I'm with @Ward. I would go with adding a fat or carb to the sauce. Whole cream, Cream cheese(great in a chili), diced and nuked til soft can neutralize heat and add nice texture. You could go easy on the sauce when plating and top with something creamy like goat or cream cheese. I think @Aaronut is right about adding a sweetner, but I wouldn't add more ...



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