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While 'hotness' is somewhat subjective, most people who cook with spices understand the concept of adjusting the heat level according to the palate of others. Simply saying "mild", medium, spicy, or slap your mama my face is on fire! The other thing to do is to just take the ride and eat it the way it is prepared. One proven way to cool the heat is with ...


0

There is no way to have this conversation on a consistent basis without ambiguity. You may find you could at certain restaurants who understand you well, but you'll never find a one size fits all way of communicating affinity for spice usage. It's because the two variables have tremendous variance in the population: the diner's individual tolerance and ...


1

As Rumtscho has pointed out, the perception of spiciness is strictly subjective. But if you were to have a standard, how would you standardize it? How would the chef comply with the standard? And then, when you get what objectively conforms with the standard you requested, how would you know you've got it? Above all, would you like the taste? First, ...


3

No, there is no objective way, other than the Scoville scale or measuring the moles of capsaicin per gram, because people lose sensitivity to spiciness as they get used to it. I would describe how spicy you want something by the type of pepper you are used to. If you can eat a habaƱero, then tell them you want it habaƱero spicy. click to expand


3

The best choice, in my opinion, is not to try to communicate - but to ask for a taste! Places that use spicy sauces will likely be willing to give you a small taste of the sauce (as spicy sauces are usually made in advance, and even if not, they likely prepare the dish for another person at some point). And even if you're asking about something that ...


22

Spiciness is a taste perception, and as such, it is simply subjective. There is no way to create an objective scale for rating it. I read your comment about "objective spiciness", but it is not something that can exist. It is based on the erroneous assumption that the spiciness you perceive is a 1:1 measurement of some quality of the food. This is not ...


5

I don't think there is an unambiguous system -- for example, the Thai places in my town alone have vastly different systems for rating how hot their dishes are (so an extra hot at one place is a medium at another, for example; this may be partially due to location and thus their clientele). It isn't like restaurants do some sort of analytical measurement on ...



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