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21

Iron is simply an element, so it cannot be destroyed by cooking (or generally temperature changes), as vitamins and other organic structures potentially can. Cooked spinach inevitably has a much lower water content, thus the relative density of all other components must increase. So gram for gram, it makes sense that cooked spinach should have a higher ...


13

Use a potato ricer. Just fill it up with a big handful of spinach, and give it a good squeeze in the sink, or over a bowl if you like to drink spinach water. It extracts a ton of liquid quickly, and is a breeze to clean up when you are done.


12

Judging by the nutrition information I can easily find (for example, from nutritiondata.self.com), frozen spinach is generally cooked by boiling and draining. That's pretty much what I'd have guessed; it's certainly the easy way to cook things. Unfortunately, that means that some nutrients are lost with the discarded water. I doubt it'd be different for any ...


9

The best way to remove the aphids is to submerge the vegetables in cold water for at least 10 minutes. Then drain, rinse them off, and dry them. Salad spinners are perfect for this. Once the aphids have been drowned and rinsed off, the greens are perfectly safe to eat. Actually, it should be safe to eat the aphids as well, it's just unappetizing.


8

The important part is to work in small batches. I just use my hands -- grab a handful, squeeze, set it aside, grab another handful, etc. Most things that you'd be tempted to use just have too large of holes, and let lots of spinach bits through, (and I admit, I miss some spinach as I start getting towards the end and it's mostly water), or they've got too ...


8

The moisture that you're talking about really has nothing to do with draining it or wringing it out. When it's heated, the cell structure breaks down and the water in the cells is released. Since it's predominately water, that means you have a lot of moisture on your pizza to make your crust soggy. At the restaurant I used to work at we had two methods. If ...


7

A bunch of spinach usually weighs something like 250-500 grams. My best guess is that something like half that is the stems, which can easily be as long as the leaves. So very roughly, I'd say a bunch is 125-250 grams. Alternately, if you want to go by volume (e.g. if your store has bulk loose baby spinach), think of a bunch as something like a head of ...


6

I learned this from Rachael Ray - use a clean (no fabric softener) cloth. Put spinach in small batches & squeeze. Works great. I use a never before used diaper. use it to squeeze moisture out of shredded zucchini too. After done, I soak the cloth in bleach water to remove the green stain then rinse the bleach out.


6

Reheating spinach can cause nitrite to be produced. Quote from eufic.org Spinach and other leafy vegetables contain high concentrations of nitrate. The amount depends on the variety, season, and the soil and water conditions where the vegetable was grown. Nitrate itself is totally harmless, but it can be converted to nitrites, and then to nitrosamines, ...


6

Frozen spinach has been boiled/blanched. You can do this if you really want it to be as much like frozen spinach as possible, but really, you can just cook it with the water left on the leaves from washing - effectively a bit more like steaming. There's no need to freeze it. This will result in something with fresher flavor and a bit more substantial texture ...


6

There are at least three different styles of 'spinach pies' that I've had (that were pizza, and not other types of 'pie'): Spinich is cooked fully before adding to the pizza. Often is saut├ęd with garlic and other seasonings. Spinich is added fresh to the pizza before it's cooked. Spinich is added fresh to the pizza after it's cooked. I'm not going to ...


6

As Catohound already mentioned, it's a symptom of using a high speed blender. You may find this technique useful. Tcrn the blender to its lowest setting and then slowly ramp it up until the top of the liquid just starts to circulate (usually around speed 4 or 5 on a Vitamix). As you run it at this low speed, you will see bubbles coming out in the ...


5

As others have said, reheated spinach may contain small amounts of nitrites. These are harmless to adults and children over 6 months, but dangerous for young infants. The upshot is: if you're not serving it to young infants, it should be fine.


5

I've only had red amaranth, so apologies if that is distinct from the type you have access to. As I recall, spinach is a bit sweeter and the leaves are a bit softer so they break down more readily. Also I believe the stem on spinach is less fibrous. That said, they are both leafy greens and I've yet to find a recipe so touchy that one leafy green can't be ...


5

Blanching briefly does an excellent job of neutralizing bitterness, or more precisely, astringency, even if the blanched spinach is recooked. Basically, boil water, add washed spinach until submerged (5-30 seconds depending on preference; chard could go up to a minute or so depending on the target texture desired). Drain quickly. Submerge drained spinach in ...


4

I use two identical plates. On one plate you can put the spinach and with the bottom of the other plate you can squeeze out the liquid.


4

Microwave ovens cook primarily by spinning water molecules. Frozen water is less susceptible to this affect. I would guess that with certain vegetables, as frozen water turns to a liquid, it is quickly heated to the point that it boils and evaporates. The heating is less even than cooking frozen vegetables in a pot and leads to areas that are somewhat ...


4

You might consider citrus or other tart fruit with citrus -- mandarin oranges segments are fairly common to pair with spinich; even if you didn't use whole fruit, consider making a vinagrette using orange juice. I've also seen recipes for spinich salads with strawberries or cranberries; I've also had a pineappe and avocado salad before that might work well ...


4

Spinach and Swiss chard contain small amounts of oxalic acid. This is the same substance that makes rhubarb so tart--in fact, it is the active ingredient in some cleaning chemicals, like Barkeeper's friend. While toxic in large quantities, you would have to eat a lot of greens (on the order of pounds to kilograms) at once to have any issues other than ...


4

Most likely, the taste you are referring to is oxalic acid, which has a bitter/astringent taste and is found in many green vegetables including spinach, Brussels sprouts, green beans, collard greens, etc. Herbs such as basil don't contain a lot of oxalic acid, and I can't say I've ever noticed it there, but they do have some. One important thing to note is,...


3

I use cheesecloth to squeeze my spinach. I put all the cooled spinach in the cheesecloth and then I keep wringing it until all the water is gone. Then I discard the cheesecloth.


3

I use a sieve that can hang over the sink. Put the spinach in the sieve. On top of the spinach put a solid bowl, and in the bowl goes some weight. I generally use whatever dry stuff I have lying around, which is normally lentils. You can use blind baking thingies if you have them. Wait for about 15 minutes.


3

A remedy I would recommend would be a bit of butter or oil, just enough to give a bit of a coating. You could do classic with a bit of butter, salt, and pepper. You could do Italian with some olive oil and garlic. Or Asian with some sesame oil and soy.


3

Before being cooked, vegetables are like a wall built from tightly filled water balloons. Each cell has is filled with water (well, technically cytoplasm, but...) which is essentially incompressible. One of the components in the cell walls is hemi-cellulose, which dissolves into the water when the vegetable is cooked. This allows the individual cells to ...


3

I find the best results from super-brief blanching. Drop washed spinach in boiling water for about 5 seconds, drain quickly, shock in ice water, squeeze out water (I use a sushi mat), chop if desired. When baked for typical pizza cooking time (90sec-12 minutes depending on style) the color stays vibrant, the flavor is generally not bitter, and it doesn't ...


3

With more spinach you need to wring the hell out of it, whether you start with fresh or frozen. Cook the spinach a bit so it starts to release its liquid, then squeeze it out with your hands doing small batches at a time. When you're done with that, put it in a clean tea towel, wrap it up and twist and wring. You'll get even more liquid. I'm surprised ...


3

Letting the spinach drain thoroughly will help; you should also increase the amount of egg in proportion to bind the additional ingredients. That will keep the ratio of binder to water in balance. You could probably also place your filling into the bottom of a casserole dish and layer with filo/phyllo, with a layer of dough to top the whole thing, assuming ...


3

It's possible that your water supply could be high in iron, either from a well, or older city pipes. When you steam spinach, some of the iron in the spinach leeches out with the circulating steam, and this may be enough to turn normally clear high iron water into disturbing looking muddy water. If this is the case, the water is safe, it's just not that ...



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