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9

It's definitely a very real reaction. I'm not sure exactly what in the squash it is that causes it, but since different people react differently - some people have strong reactions like you, some people have mild ones, and some have no problem at all - it seems to be some sort of mild allergic reaction. It's often called contact dermatitis, but that's a very ...


8

Split the squash in half lengthwise, drizzle with olive oil, and place face-down on a foil-covered baking sheet. I usually roast for 45 min to an hour, depending on the size of the squash. The inside 'noodles' can then be scooped out with a fork for an awesome pasta substitution. Enjoy!


5

If it is a quick bread then it should be chemically leavened with baking powder or soda. The presence, or absence, of sugar should not play a role at all in the working of baking powder. Where sugar may play a role, however, is in creaming the fat. If this recipe calls for solid fat such as butter or shortening then it will often also call for the sugar to ...


5

I blanch it, run it under cold water or put into ice water to stop any further cooking. Then I pat dry and store individual portions in the freezer. I love to make fritters with them and this makes it easy to do, not to mention it is a great way to save the wonderful flavors of summer squash. Hope this is helpful. SORRY, I see somebody else already ...


5

I feel your pain. If only I liked summer squash better... You definitely can freeze squash -- thick slice it, blanch it in salty water briefly until almost tender, transfer to an ice bath until it's chilled, bag it, and put in the freezer. Later, thaw and use with recipes that don't require ultra-crisp squash.


5

It looks to me like you need umami. One easy, healthy thing you can add is powdered dried shiitake or porcini mushrooms. I just throw the dried mushrooms into a spice grinder, it's a powerful punch. EDIT: (SAJ14SAJ refers to the same concept, glutamates, in his answer)


4

Assuming you cooked thoroughly, your squash got innoculated after you took it out of the oven. Was your counter clean? Had you just made bread? What's the history of the storage bag? Did you recently spill yogurt in the fridge? You've got a source of contamination, and need to think carefully about everything that came in contact with the squash after you ...


4

To roast acorn squash, set your oven to 350 and roast for about 30-35 minutes. I normally roast cut side up, unless I am using some kind of sauce to go with it. I find that the squash cooks to a more even color than when you place it directly against a metal pan which can develop diffrent temps across the surface. You can also baste with some butter as ...


4

You could try putting it in a seive, salting it slightly and then placing a weight on it for about ten minutes. That should draw a lot of the water out of it. Don't forget to adjust the sauce for the salt added to the squash.


4

I have seen those before when I have cooked squash; they seem more common when I microwave it. I suspect they are just starchy deposits. I have always just wiped them off and eaten it anyway.


4

You can also make it in the microwave. Either split first, remove the seeds and stringy goop, and place face-down on a microwave-safe plate or just prick it with a fork and cook it. Time will depend on size, but cook it until it's nice and soft. Then just use a fork to scrape out the flesh. The flesh will automatically come out in strings. You can also ...


4

The fruit from the Cucurbit family (pumpkins, squash, zucchini, melons, gourds etc) are all very good at cross pollinating. This will create some very strange fruits. I have accidentally grown all kinds of odd things. I would imagine that they are more common at markets & places where people sell produce grown on smaller (than commercial scale ...


4

That's a cue ball zucchini. It's similar to a one ball zucchini (yellow), and an eight ball zucchini (dark green, almost black). All of them are round and great squashes to stuff and roast. Hope you enjoyed it!


4

While I agree with some of the other answers that glutamates and nucleotides will help enhance the flavor of your dish, I don't think that's where you need to start. As is, your "health mash" barely has any flavor to enhance. I'd start instead by adding some aromatics. You'd be amazed how much more flavor you'll get if you just add some sauteed or ...


3

I think Wayfaring nailed it. Bread is most likely. After years of baking you may find you have a certain population established in your kitchen as well. It is also possible you had your windows open because it was a fine spring day and some natural yeast wandered in.


3

Pureeing creates and enormous amount of surface area to become contaminated. This is the same reason ground meat is so dangerous. Roasting the squash helped to turn much of the starch into sugar. as Roland Taylor said, the squash likely picked up spores through the air or from your hands. A warm sugary squash is a great place for yeast to begin turning sugar ...


3

If your recipe relies on yeast to make it rise, Splenda will not work. Sugar is food for yeast: if it's zero calories for you, it's zero calories for the little yeastie beasties too.


3

As long as it doesn't have soft spots, and when you cut it open there is no mold or rot inside, it is still fine. I've often used acorn squash that have partially turned orange, and yes, that is just further (but unneeded) ripening.


3

There are three main things that are going to add or enhance the flavor of food. Salt, sugar, and glutimates. This is why the restaurant trio of salt, butter, and bacon is so effective at making things taste good. Cheese is another ingredient that brings most of these factors to the table, especially hard aged cheeses like Parmesan. Tomatoes also help ...


2

Have you tried Squash/Pumpkin Ravioli? The filling is very easy to make (Squash, egg, nutmeg, cinnamon, Cream) and freezes very well.


2

If you have recipes that take shredded squash (or zucchini while you're at it), you can shred the squash and then place it in a freezer bag and then into the freezer. This works really well for zucchini that's bound for bread, but squash for some soups, bread, or similar uses would work as well.


2

I've heard that spaghetti squash can be more watery if your overcook it, so perhaps take it out of the over a little earlier as it will continue to cook once you've added to to your sauce. I can't say I've had this problem before but they are quite watery squash. Perhaps you could try salting it when roasting in order to draw out some of the water? You can ...


2

I slice my squash in half, scrap the insides out. Add salt, pepper, and a little olive oil to coat both sides. roast in oven at 400 for 30 mins. Comes out perfect everytime. I learned this method in a gourmet cooking class. As far as the squash being too watery, just dont mix the sauce and squash...just spoon the sauce on top before eating. If you ...


2

One simple change you could make is to simply not mix the squash with the sauce, instead, plate the squash and then pour sauce over the top, the sauce will cool quicker which will reduce the amount that the squash cooks past the point you decided that it was ready. If the squash still cooks too much on the plate, try starting your sauce earlier and letting ...


2

If it's a summer squash you could maybe try freezing it? Since it's being turned into baby food anyway, preserving crisp, freshness isn't high on the list of priorities? Disclaimer: I have no experience freezing summer squashes, but a quick google came up with this and it seems to make sense: http://www.pickyourown.org/freezing_summer_squash.htm A further ...


2

I always go with my gut in these situations, so scraping it off is probably a good idea. If the green was not really dark and moldy looking, or really soft in comparison to the rest of the flesh, it could be that it just wasn't fully ripe yet in that area. Either way, you're planning on cooking the squash, correct? I believe that this would be perfectly ...


2

I've had this happen before after preparing butternut squash. Once, I also found that my fingers turned shiny. I realized that the wax that was on the butternut squash had gotten on my hands since I had rinsed the squash under hot water before peeling. It was impossible to wash away this wax coating on my fingers, so I just left it on my hands even though ...


2

Most Japanese varieties of pumpkin do not need to be peeled. More precisely, most Japanese are content to eat most Japanese varieties of squash unpeeled (maybe rough peeled where knobs are present). I can't really recall treating red kuri any differently, but I don't find it very often, so I can only speak from limited experience. The typical preparation of ...


2

I suspect the problem was the 1/2 inch of water, which would have absorbed a goodly amount of the microwave energy, preventing it from heating the flesh of the squash. For very slightly more detailed instructions, which are not too far off from what you have tried, you might try this recipe from the Food Network, which recommends 5-7 minutes for 1/2 of a ...


2

Acorn squashes are notoriously difficult to cut. There are two techniques, short of a bandsaw, that can make it easier: Using a sharp chef's knife, chop into the side. Now, lay a folded towel over the top of the blade, and tap it with a wooden meat mallet similar, slowly pushing it through. Use a cleaver (not the delicate oriental style). You won't have ...



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