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20

There is empirical support for the effect of temperature on pitting corrosion, although from what little I'm able to understand of the very complicated metallurgy, the common explanation given is far too simplistic and the actual behaviour is not nearly as clear-cut as "colder = more salt crystals = more pitting", but rather due to something called ...


18

I can answer you with first hand experience and a picture. Your lovely dark gray finish will become light gray, streaked, and hideous. I'll never buy this style of pot again, it is just too useful to be able to dishwash them sometimes.


17

What makes a good pan? The main properties of a metal pan that are of interest to a cook are: Evenness of heat distribution. Every burner produces more heat in some spots than others. The better the pan conduct heat, the more this heat is evened out before it is conducted into the food being cooked, which is important to prevent local hotspots in the pan, ...


13

Also, you can get uncoated steel a lot hotter than you can get teflon (which will break down -- it's basically plastic). So you can sear meats at a much higher temperature than you can cook them on teflon. For some things it doesn't matter, like sweating vegetables, but anything where you want to get some real heat involved to develop browned flavors, you're ...


12

Modern stainless steel pans with clad bottoms can be as good as copper pans.  McGee developed a simple technique to test the heat distribution where he fits a piece of paper to the bottom of the pan, placing the pan over a burner and carefully watching how the paper browns.  Thick aluminum, clad bottom stainless, and copper all worked equally well.  There ...


12

The advantage of using stainless steel is the fond (tasty brown bits) that form in the pan. It both flavors whatever you are sauteing and is often used as the base for a pan sauce.


12

Bar Keeper's Friend in powdered form and some elbow grease will solve this problem. The first time you tackle it, it can be a real pain to get the pan cleaned up, but if you keep up with it regularly after that, it's not to bad. Great cleaning supply.


12

This happens to mine, and they are most definitely stainless, not aluminum. Our stainless sink gets the same way. I assume it's from all the minerals in our water. I have found that mixing up some Oxyclean and water and a couple of minutes' soak and a scrub with a plastic scrubber will get rid of it (both from the pan and from the sink). It comes right back, ...


12

bikeboy definitely has it right, but just to be a little more specific: What you're seeing is scale, also referred to as fouling and several other terms. In all probability, it is specifically limescale that you're seeing, and it's very common in hot water taps, kettles, and on air-dried cookware. If you have hard water (or even if you don't) it will tend ...


12

This is quite common and pretty harmless. The scratches you see don't go very deep, nor are they very wide. My All-Clad saute pan is nearing 10 years old and has a ton of micro-scratches on the interior. It still performs beautifully. That said, the scratches can grab onto proteins and cause sticking. However, this is simple to prevent with both oil and ...


11

I've never heard of doing anything other than giving it a good cleaning, as you would with any new item before first use. I've only heard of seasoning used for cast iron and carbon steel, not for stainless steel. Looking online, I did find instructions for seasoning stainless steel, but I'd be inclined to look at the paperwork that came with the pan -- if ...


11

Carbon steel is more malleable and less brittle than stainless steel. This means that it is easier to hone on a knife steel, to maintain an extremely sharp edge. Some folks feel that the benefit of that sharp edge–for example, in easily slicing tomatoes, and other very fast prep tasks–is worth the compromise of more persnickety maintenance.


9

Dishwashing fluid isn't a simple soap; it's much more aggressive. A good portion of it is sodium hydroxide (lye) which will attack the protective layer on aluminum surfaces (aluminum oxide), allowing for significant corrosion to occur. All aluminum will form this oxide layer in air, but it can also be intentionally grown via anodization and colored to form ...


8

The usual reason given is that Aluminum will react with the alkalis in dishwasher detergent and discolour. Automatic dishwasher detergent has a lot of stuff in it.


8

This is little off the beaten path, but try a solvent gun cleaner (not oil). I recently (last week) caused a catastrophic burn on one of my skillets when I let it get entirely too hot before throwing a steak on it. After a few hundred cubic feet of smoke, a smoke alarm that sounded more like an air-raid siren, and a stubborn decision to let my steak cook ...


8

I wonder where you have read it. Your link doesn't help, maybe you linked the wrong question? It talks about using a stainless pan with oil. If you are talking about true saute (very quick movement of bite-sized pieces of food on a very hot pan), it is completely impossible without oil. If you are misusing the term to mean shallow frying, you can do it ...


7

This looks like half-polymerized oil. It happens when you overheat a layer of oil in the pan. It won't come off through scraping. If you insist on removing it mechanically, you will have to try a polishing brush on a Dremel or something similar. I remove these chemically. Make a lye concentrate in the pot and let it sit overnight. Rinse very (!) ...


7

As others have already said, it appears to be polymerized oil. It happens when oil is left in the pan hot for a long period (temperature depends on oil), or smoking for not as long. However, lye probably isn't required to remove it. Bar Keeper's Friend and a bit of scrubbing will probably manage to take this off. As an advantage, while getting BKF on your ...


6

I will add my (admittedly somewhat subjective) experience with using both copper and stainless. I have a couple of copper pans (all stainless lined) that I got as gifts and also some high-end stainless ones, and they're comparable in thickness (both bottoms and sidewalls), though the copper is heavier due to cast bronze handles. If I try to cook rice in the ...


5

This isn't a perfect test, but a magnet won't stick to a silver utensil whereas it will stick to most other metal utensils (i.e., stainless steel).


5

Summary: All materials are different, and copper is no exception. It has some unique thermal properties that may be desirable for some applications. But other combinations of materials (particularly aluminum) within a modern stainless pan can have other unique advantages that come close to -- and in some ways exceed -- copper's properties. (For a ...


5

Seasoning the pan will make it less likely to stick, but will also give it a brownish tinge, so it won't be "shiny and new" looking. And if you ever scrub it with steel wool, you'll have to do it all over again. Seasoning the pan basically creates a surface of oil that has been baked on so that your food is on that rather than directly touching the metal, ...


5

I don't think you can appreciably reduce the life of a pan that way. I have a pan I've been scrubbing for 16 years and it's just fine.


5

Typically "oven safe" indicates that none of the components will break down in high heats. As there are no plastic or wooden components, and the utensil is all metal, it would appear that it is oven safe. Assuming there are no other chemical compounds used in the fry pan that would break down you should be good to go and toss it in the oven as long as you ...


4

Yes, these are from burned-on oil. Steel wool should get it shiny again, with a little work. Note that this will scuff the finish of "bright" stainless steel. This is the outside of the pan, though, so who cares? Even if you are careful, you will get similar stains again - they are pretty much inevitable. Consider them "battle scars" :-)


4

As a follow-up to Harlan - I do my eggs in either a stainless steel pan (scrambled and poached) or an enamelled omelette pan (which is technically a kind of non-stick) - which cleans like a dream. Which is to say, I don't even see the need for Teflon for eggs. The only cleaning difficulty is if you leave eggy residue in a stainless steel pan - but at least ...


4

I have a lot of canned food and have gone through my share of can openers. I'm generally OK with a rusty can opener, but I don't like the rust flakes getting into my food. I can't bear that metallic taste. While I don't mind buying a new can opener (they sell them at the dollar general for two dollars), but I find it a bit wasteful. This may sound a bit ...


4

Like all aluminium they will discolour in the dishwasher, but will still be safe to use. One site I saw stated that the discolouration can be avoided by removing before the rinse cycle, which suggests to me it's the softeners rather than the detergent that does the damage. It's worth noting that very acidic foods or prolonged cooking can also stain ...


4

NO! You never season stainless steel. Seasoning is the result of carbon "binding" with a cast iron surface creating a natural non stick layer. The chrome in the stainless steel keeps that process from happening properly and/or evenly, which is likely to leave you with a badly stained and sticky pan. You keep stainless clean and shiny.


4

Generally speaking the answer is heat. Have a nice hot pan, and oil the fish, not the pan. Bottom line though is that there's a reason they call them 'non-stick' pans.



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