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53

You can use the rule of thumb method to measure the "doneness" of the steak: You loosely touch one of your fingers with your thumb depending on how well done you want it, and the tension of the muscle of your hand below the thumb will be the same as how the meat should feel when you press it.


42

You should be able to get a reasonable steak stovetop using a cast iron grill pan, if you have a strong enough exhaust. Oil the cast iron pan (with canola or such), then heat it very hot, until it starts to smoke. Make sure the meat is completely dry on the outside (wipe with a paper towel, water will prevent browning) and gently place in the pan. Leave it ...


36

First, let the meat warm to about room temperature. This way you aren't trying to heat up a cold center. Personally I prefer to only cook each side once (meaning I only flip the meat over once). The actual temperature of your grill and the amount of time you cook it per side will depend on the thickness of the steak and how you want it done. Don't use a fork ...


35

The most important thing you can do is buy quality beef. You can throw a USDA Select steak on a 700 degree charcoal grill, cook it perfectly, and it'll still be tough and not at all what you'd get at a fine steakhouse. In the USA there are three grades of beef available to a consumer: Select, Choice, and Prime. There are lesser grades but they go to fast ...


34

Butter is a very bad choice for frying at high heat, as it burns extremely easily. Cast iron is the ideal pan material though, so you are halfway there. Take the steaks out of the fridge an hour before cooking so they warm up a little. Take a flavourless oil like sunflower and brush it directly on the steaks - don't put the oil in the pan. Preheat the ...


31

If you're at all like me, you are reassured by hard numbers and measurables. This should help. In this situation one of the likely pathogens would be one of the Salmonella species. Salmonella is killed by temperatures in excess of 130 F (55 C). However, it's not an instant death. The time to kill Salmonella decreases exponentially as the temperature ...


29

Sure it's safe. You are about to char the outside at very high temperatures, nothing's going to survive that, so cleaning it is more about flavor than safety. I wouldn't just wipe it though, clean it with water or you might get a dirtier steak flavor than you'd like.


23

An important part of the process missed by the other answers is allowing the meat to rest for up to ten minutes before before serving (depending on size). This is because at temperature the muscle fibres have tightened up and are unable to retain their juices. A steak straight off the heat and cut open will instantly lose all its juices. If you allow the ...


22

This is total nonsense: grass fed ribeye should absolutely not be tough. Toughness is, however, affected by the cow's breed, it's age, by how stressed it was when it was slaughtered, by ageing of the meat, and I'm sure a bunch of other variables too. Something made the meat tough, but it wasn't grass feeding - the combination of strong beefy flavour and ...


22

A good Sirloin (New York Strip steak) has a reasonable marble of fat, so you should not have to worry about edge fat If you like your fat, pull/trim the silverskin and fat off and render the fat in a medium hot pan BEFORE putting the steak in. When enough fat has melted for your taste, cook the steak in the fat at the temperature and time you like Add ...


21

Definitely don't rinse the salt off. One of the nice things the salt does is pull juices to the surface of the meat--not enough to dry things out, but enough so that when the steak hits the hot pan you have a nice protein-laden coating (it's called a pellicle when talking about smoked fish--not sure about steaks) on the outside to caramelize. If you rinse ...


20

Here's how I grill a steak: Let it thaw completely before attempting to cook it. Set the grill to medium/high heat. Clean the grill by putting an onion on a skewer and using that to clean the bars. It adds flavor and gets the bars clean for a clean cook. For an average thickness steak, I throw it on the grill, close the cover, wait 6 minutes. (closing the ...


20

Here is the method I use for turning out a perfect steak every time. Pick a quality piece of meat that is approximately 1.5 inches(almost 4cm) thick. Let it sit on the counter-top for 30-45 minutes until it is roughly room temperature. Heat up a cast-iron skillet (or similar) to medium-high. Lightly coat the skillet with an oil that has a high smoke point ...


16

It's as safe as any other raw meat consumption. It all comes down to quality beef and best practices when handling. Two rules of thumb: Don't use steak from a supermarket. Use a butcher, preferably one you know and trust. Tell your butcher you intend to eat it raw.


16

Here's a couple of hints: Learn to judge doneness by feel. See this answer for a good guide to temp by feel. Learn to judge grill temp by hand. Hold your hand palm down about 3-4 inches above the grill. If you can hold it there for a second or two, it's hot; 3-4 seconds is medium; 5-6 seconds is low. Sear first. Start with a very hot grill. You want ...


15

Hot, hot, hot. Steak restaurants use a very hot grill. That's the key. You want to get a good sear on the outside without over cooking the interior. The three ways I've seen used with success at home are: Broil on high. You need a good broiler for this Use a cast iron pan (preferably with ridges) and get it very hot before you begin Use a grill. Get it up ...


15

First of all, I agree with the others that there is no harm done by plastic bags for sous vide. I have read a statement by the manufacturer that brand-name Ziploc bags don't release anything below 76°C. If you think how much a lawsuit could cost them if the information turned out to be wrong, I trust that they are telling the truth. For other brands, you may ...


15

"3-4 minutes of searing on each side" sounds very high to me, and likely to result in a burned steak, especially if you don't flip it frequently during the process. It's important to realize that there are (at least) two temperatures that matter when cooking meat: the peak surface temperature, which determines how well browned (or blackened) the meat will ...


15

Thin cut meat will curl if there is an outside perimeter of fat, gristle or silverskin (which there usually is). Those things shrink faster than the meat, causing the curling. Take a pair of kitchen shears or a sharp knife and make tiny cuts (it shouldn't take more than 1/4 inch) every inch or so around the perimeter of the steak, just into the meat itself. ...


14

Butchered meat is generally sterile except on its exterior. (That doesn't mean parasite- or botulism-free, but it's a start.) Get the best quality you can from a source you trust. Keep it at as low a temperature as possible, and don't expose it to warm air for more than the few minutes it takes to prepare. Cut with a clean knife on a clean surface. Put ...


13

One thing restaurants commonly do that no one has mentioned yet is to grill the steak until it looks right on the outside, then stick it in the oven until it's "done". There's a good chance your grill is just too hot to get the steak perfect.


13

If you are really nervous, a trick I have heard of is to start with a really thick piece of beef. Then sear it on both sides in a hot pan. At this point the outside would be deemed safe and the interior is typically safe so you cut away the cooked parts. Then proceed to make the steak tartare with the still raw inside part. As a bonus those nice browned ...


13

This depends completely on the context. Are you at a grill in let's say.. Outback Steakhouse? If so, please throw it away. Are you at a social event or home cooking for yourself/others? clean it off with water and you're good, maybe even feed it to someone you don't like afterwards (unless it's the biggest and best steak, then you gotta eat it.)


12

The Kansas City Strip and the New York Strip refer to the same cut of meat. Apparently restaurants in New York City in the 1930's decided they couldn't sell a fancy steak named after Kansas City (where the stockyards and slaughterhouses were located). So, they just started calling it a New York Strip. If you want a steak renamed by a egotistical chef, ...


12

Your best bet for preserving quality (and safety) is to re-seal the bag, then leave them in the fridge for a bit. You want them to thaw a little, so you can pry them apart. Its safe to re-freeze after this (as the meat never entered the danger zone, indeed it probably never got above ~30°F). There will be some quality loss from the partial thaw-freeze cycle. ...


12

There is no single answer to this question. Instead, a number of factors (not including the weather) affect the perceived tenderness or moistness of a steak or other cut of meat. Overview There are two major factors that effect the perceived moistness of a steak or other cut of meat: The amount of connective tissue. The more connective tissue the meat ...


11

First, cooking on a very high heat is appropriate only if you want the meat browned on the outside but very rare ("almost totally raw", as the questioner puts it) on the inside. Since this is evidently not what the questioner wants, the first thing to do is to turn down the heat. This will take you a long way towards a great steak: salt both sides just ...



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