Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If farmgrown and properly looked after, you should not have any problem eating raw/uncooked beef. These cattle are parasite free and healthy. Humans are still wired to consume raw meat. Yes, we have evolved from eating raw uncooked unseasoned meat to eating properly prepared food over the last couple of thousand years, but we haven't lost the ability to ...


2

It is not (immediately) hazardous to your health. I say immediately because I would not recommend eating fat or gristle en masse. I used to marinate my steak every time I prepared it. I have gotten away from this habit. Marinating breaks down the integrity of steak. This is desired if you are cooking a less tender cut. I eat steak less frequently now, ...


0

It's been a few hours...how do you feel? Kidding aside, you say you got it from a good butcher...that helps....you say you cooked until the meat was medium to well done. If you start with a quality product and cook it to an internal temperature that achieves medium to well done, it is safe to assume that the whole steak is safe to eat.


1

Regardless of whether pan-searing seals in the flavor (it doesn't), Malachi is correct. The poster who was rewarded with the winning answer will have ruined his steak. I will add some details for the roasting. Preheat your oven to 500F Pan-sear first, high heat. If you didn't produce smoke in your kitchen, you did it wrong. Have prepared a drip system ...


0

Outer skirt is much harder to find, and much of what's left in the US is sold to restaurant vendors, in particular, Hispanic restaurants that offer carne asada dishes. If you are able to grab it, it should be treated in the same way as inner, but has a much higher fat content. Outer would be the ribeye, inner would be a sirloin. I'm sure you can make your ...


0

I actually worked in Oklahoma in a restaurant as a cook and the difference is nothing. The two cuts are the same.


1

Or can I simply improve the way I cook the steak and avoid the seasoning sticking and burning? Polishing might help you some, but you may want to make sure you're doing things right before you go to the trouble: Make sure that the pan is well-heated before you drop in the food. Make sure that you have sufficient oil. You can either oil the food just ...


2

(1) It is worth noting that many people prefer stainless steel pans to cook meats on because they are NOT non-stick (meaning they stick). The fat rendered during cooking, along with the bits of fat and meat that stick to the surface are called "fond" and are used to make pan sauces to serve with the meat. This is a big selling point for SS pans. (2) ...


2

Whenever I am going to sear meat and use olive oil, I season the meat as you describe but wait until I am ready to cook and brush with olive oil just before putting into the pan. (Works especially well with lamb chops!) This allows time for the meat to take on some of the seasoning flavors, the salt will be mostly dissolved, and the pepper will stay with the ...


4

I will shamelessly steal @Jolenealaska's thunder and recommend velveting your meat as a means to protect against overcooking. This is a great method to bring meats just up to temperature, and is a very traditional preparation for stir-frys. Should work nicely with your Hunan Beef.


2

Press it down in the pan with a potato masher (ricer). A potato masher is better than other large surface area implements because you can apply vertical force, therefore more of it.


3

Marinading should help a great deal, especially a good long marinade. The only other thing you can do is make sure not to overcook the beef. Cutting against the grain doesn't guarantee tenderness any more than any other method will, it just helps, so don't worry too much.



Top 50 recent answers are included