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0

Cooking is easy; baking is too. The first thing you need to do is ignore all the BS about how hard it is, or how you have to do weird things. As others have pointed out, you use a pan to brown the steak, creating the Maillard reaction. "Searing" (as in "to seal in the juices") is one of those BS things to ignore. You don't need an extreme heat to brown ...


1

I'm an ex-professional chef,recently retired,(jan,2014),and feel that I could offer you some advice on where I think you went wrong. There are indeed many variables to consider,and ,as such,congratulations on 'having a go'.Please don't let this 'failure' put you off trying again.You learn more from your failures than you do from not making mistakes at all. ...


0

why high heat. I cook for medium rare about 3 minutes per 1/2 inch per side on medium heat. Usually dry pat on a seasoning before searing. I use a cooking oil in pan. you put butter on steak when you put them in oven.


2

With all due respect to the kind people writing recipes online for newly hatched cooks everywhere, steaks are not a dish - it's an artform. Please take this as constructive advice and let me elaborate: Cooking steaks just right demands taking into account so many factors that following a recipe is not reliable. Instead, my advice is to simply experiment ...


4

I don't recommend frequently flipping a steak when pan-searing or frying. What you're trying to accomplish is a caramelized crust on the meat surfaces. My method is similar to some listed above. Remove the steak and thaw if necessary (I thaw in the refrigerator due to food-safety concerns), then set the steak out for at least an hour to allow to reach room ...


-1

Sorry about your steaks. I am a middle aged woman who has been cooking meat for a , long long time. I have never successfully mastered pan frying a chop or steak. They always turn out overcooked. If you have an oven, most likley there is a broiler which allows the meat direct exposure to the heat source. Try broiling your steaks. Experiment with how ...


1

Did you dry the meat? Moisture on the exterior of the meat will impede browning. Also in a well seasoned cast iron pan, I won't use any oil at all. Salt, pepper, straight into a hot pan. Cast iron is great for searing, however it can also take a long time to get hot enough. I'll also mention that tenderloin can be unforgiving. They tend to have less ...


15

"3-4 minutes of searing on each side" sounds very high to me, and likely to result in a burned steak, especially if you don't flip it frequently during the process. It's important to realize that there are (at least) two temperatures that matter when cooking meat: the peak surface temperature, which determines how well browned (or blackened) the meat will ...


34

Butter is a very bad choice for frying at high heat, as it burns extremely easily. Cast iron is the ideal pan material though, so you are halfway there. Take the steaks out of the fridge an hour before cooking so they warm up a little. Take a flavourless oil like sunflower and brush it directly on the steaks - don't put the oil in the pan. Preheat the ...


4

You have mentioned in your comments that you don't rest steak. This is why it leaks the red liquid when you cut it. Any good restaurant will rest your steak, hence them being less leaky. This Serious Eats article explains very well why you should rest steak (and any other meat). Essentially, as the meat cools, the shape of its fibers changes, allowing it to ...


1

So ... as I was the one that said that, a few clarifications: Heating extra virgin olive oil will break it down, losing the fruity qualities that are generally the reason that you select it over other types of olive oil. Although it'll work for cooking, it's not ideal, no matter what Rachel Ray would have you believe. (I typically use a virgin olive oil ...


3

No. Steak needs be seared at a high, high temperature. Not only would extra virgin olive oil lose everything that makes it special at such a high temperature (so not worth the expense anyway), it would also burn. The smoke point of EVOO is 350F, 180C (give or take). That's simply way too low for searing steak. There is no such thing as a cooking oil that's ...


2

As long as they were kept cool, they will be safe to eat. For example, high end steak houses and butchers age beef to improve flavor, sometimes to the point of allowing visible mold to form on the surface. In that circumstance it is removed before cooking, but the meat is safe to eat. The fact that yours were immersed in water for a prolonged time may ...


-3

I'll remind you of the old ways: batter, clay and salt dough used in a similar way to duck skin.


0

I've marinated chicken for a week and put it on the grille and it is soooooo good. I agree the smell test is the best thing and I always throw out the marinade.


0

One could also cook the steak "low temp" or "sous vide" to the desired doneness, then chill. In this case a high heat sear on a grill or flat top would only take a minute per side, to brown or form crust...greatly decreasing the time it takes from order to plate.


4

When I worked the wheel at a local restaurant, we served 4oz medallions of filet mignon that went from fridge directly to grill. Only took about 5 minutes on each side, then the steak was plated and sent to the table. There was no "wait until room temp", oven or rest stage. The rest stage wasn't necessary because we weren't pre-slicing the steak before ...


1

As far as I have experienced steaks are rarely brought to room temperature before cooking except for steaks cooked 'bleu' or 'blue'. You also have to consider that kitchen equipment deliver much more heat than your regular domestic stove. Furthermore the cooking equipment eg chargrills, stoves, flat grills, etc... are always on, hot and ready to cook. In ...



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