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I'm not sure the altitude is a concern when cooking Swiss steak. You're essentially doing most of the cooking when you sear it on the stove top. You finish the cooking by raising the internal temperature gradually in a Crock Pot. The reason for using a Crock Pot as opposed to the oven is because the lower temperature setting slows down the rate at which the ...


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The juices in the bag tend to be watered down too much, particularly after a very long cook. You can make a good sauce, but you need to begin with a super concentrated stock in the bag. Then, reduce further after the cook. I think the general practice, at least at my house, is to dispense with the left over liquid in the bag and create any sauces on the ...


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Don't time your steaks. A medium rare steak will feel like the pad of your chin when pressed. Press your finger against the fatty pad at the end of your chin, then (after cleaning your hands, sanitation first!), press against the middle of the steak. They should feel about the same.


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According to the USDA, these names are branding only. The USDA defines steaks of the loin with a few names. Legally, either steak can be from any of the final four of these, but traditionally, both are from the final two. Loin, Porterhouse Steak Loin, T-Bone Steak Loin, Strip Loin Steak, Bone-In Loin, Strip Loin Steak, Center Cut, Bone-In Loin, Strip ...


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This is a 'how long is a piece of string' question. The thickness of the meat, the thickness and material of the pan, your hob type and various other factors will all influence the cooking time. So it is impossible to give you a hard and fast answer. The best solution is to simply remove time from the equation altogether. Invest in a quick read digital ...


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Same exact cut of meat. I used to work in a meat market. There is zero difference, other than New Yorkers thinking it's "their" steak, when the specific cut originated in Kansas City.


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There's controversy over whether sprinkling or rubbing rubs is correct. On the one side, people argue that rubbing causes abrasion which allows juices to run out. Meat is already cut. Meat is not a water balloon that's going to leak if the surface is scratched with a run. I always rub my seasoning in (and typically apply it liberally).


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(IMO) Wet marinade need to be applied some time before cooking the meat (hours before) and works best on "difficult" meat like hangar steak or meat that needs to be cook/smoked for a long time (ribs,...) My experience with wet rub is that my grill needs to be very hot and I need to remove as much marinade and dry the meat before putting it on the grill ...


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I have eaten skirt steak for over 80 years and the outside skirt steak is the best and the most expensive. You can buy it in high end grocery stores. When I was a child my mother soaked it in egg for a time, dipped it in bread crumbs and fryed it in bacon grease. I still make it this way. You can now buy organic skirt steak and in my area this is over $20 ...


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Onions contain proteolytic enzymes, just like honey and certian fruits, which makes them ideal to help tenderize meat. They are a common veggies low in calories and are a common state in many cuisines around the world. One prime example is a dish from Japan known as Chaliapin Steak. Which is a dish where you score the meat(make grid lines), pound the beef, ...



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