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42

If your stock turns to jelly in the fridge, it means you did it right! Simmering the bones breaks down the collagen and turns it into gelatin; that's the very essence of stock-making. The gelatin is exactly what you want from the stock; at low temperatures it has a very jelly-like consistency, but at higher temperatures it melts and provides a very rich ...


23

Classification and use of Stocks vs. Broth: Broths are generally the result of preparing another item and usually not prepared specifically on their own. The juices poured off from a roasted turkey (after being degreased) would be considered broth. Whole chickens being poached for another preparation would create broth. Stocks are prepared specifically ...


22

Stock is made from bones only and broth is the liquid that meat has been simmered in. A well made stock should be clear without particles or cloudiness. Broth will usually be somewhat cloudy due to containing more dissolved proteins. Bones for lamb stock (and any brown stock - veal can be made white or brown but lamb is usually brown) are typically first ...


17

You need to strain the stock and cool it until it's 40 degrees F. or below before you refrigerate it. Leaving it to cool overnight on the stove is going to create a bacteria cesspool. The temperature danger zone is between 40 and 140 degrees. This is the range that is prime for the growth of bacteria. Food safety guidelines require that it cool to 70 ...


17

Meat can add a lot of good flavor to a stock, but it can cause a lot of "scum" to form, so you have to be more diligent in your skimming, otherwise you get cloudiness. The bigger problem with winglets is that they're mostly skin, which equals fat, which is generally not a good thing for stock. Again, though, there's a way to fix it: refrigerate the stock, ...


16

Absolutely, go ahead and use it. I always ignore the "white and light green parts" instruction anyway, and use the leek up until the point where it feels dried out instead of firm and fleshy—well into the dark green parts—and it's always delicious, even when cooked for significantly less than several hours.


14

Typically veggies are onions, carrots, celery, leeks, garlic, shallots, etc. Throw in some peppercorns, also, and a Bouquet garni. You can add most other veggies, too, and mushrooms, but avoid adding things that give a strong (bad) flavour after cooked for a long time (broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, etc.).


14

Roasting the bones will give you a darker brown stock than using the raw bones. To roast the bones, just stick them in an oven on high heat, around 450 for about 45 minutes, or until they are a nice golden caramelized color. Though you will want to make sure to keep an eye on them the first time, I'd check every 5 minutes after half an hour. Roasting the ...


12

Some of your 'shortcuts' are not good ideas. Definitely start with cold water. Definitely bring up the temp slowly. Definitely do not boil. Do add aromatics upfront to the broth, but remove them as they get mushy so they don't cloud it. Standard ratio for beef broth would be: 8 pounds of bones to 6 quarts of water to 1 pound of veggies (onion, leek, carrot) ...


12

The differences between stock, broth, consommé and bouillon is actually quite difficult to pin down. At one time a stock was something that was kept on the cooker and was constantly added to. These additions could have been meat, vegetables etc. Hence the name stock. These days fresh stock is typically made fresh, when needed. A stock typically forms the ...


12

Skimming is for aesthetic purposes. The scum is denatured protein, mostly comprising the same proteins that make up egg whites. It is harmless and flavorless, but visually unappealing. Eventually, the foam will break up into microscopic particles and disperse into your stock, leaving it grayish and cloudy. The more vigorously your stock bubbles, the ...


12

Gelatin is naturally occurring in meat and poultry, it's broken down collagen, which is the material that distributes force throughout the muscle. You couldn't actually get rid of it easily even if you wanted to, so it isn't necessarily that you want it, but that it is there. Reducing the stock until it is gelatinous simply means that you've gotten rid of ...


11

Salmon or Tuna will make a very strong flavoured stock and will have lots of oil that coat your tongue. Not what you're looking for if you want a light brightly flavoured fish sauce. In a traditional French kitchen you want generic stocks (fish/brown/chicken/veal) that are able to be used for a wide range of sauces/dishes so having a salmon stock around ...


11

My best guess is that your stock is very weak. Two gallons of water to just the bones from one turkey will not be a strong stock. It may well well have gelatin in it, but very thin. I make stock for a single turkey with the wing tips (not the 'drumstick' part), the back, the neck--everything but the breast and leg/thighs in with about 1 gallon of water to ...


10

Both methods are acceptable. A stock made with roasted bones is called a brown stock. A stock made from raw bones is a white stock (or sometimes just stock). Practically, it's very difficult to get a true "white" stock with beef, as opposed to chicken, since all of the impurities will darken or cloud the colour - but that is semantics. Brown stocks have ...


10

This sounds counterproductive. Making stock means that you let the boiling water leach nutrients, flavors, and other stuff from the bones. Then you remove the solid parts (bones, scum) and are left with the gelatine and flavors dissolved in the water. Now, if you preboil the bones and throw away the water, you throw away all the flavor which has been ...


9

Broth is actually frequently made from stock. It doesn't have to be, but often what a cook will do is make the stock using the bones to give it an even flavour and then boil the actual meat and some vegetables in it to make the broth. Throw in some grains and it's basically a soup - the line between broth and soup is blurry, if it exists at all. Broth can ...


9

When I want to freeze portions of almost anything liquid (including stocks and sauces), I use a covered ice cube tray like OXO Good Grips. Just spoon it into the tray and throw it in the freezer. Easy! Keeps very well, and makes it very easy to portion out later. The OXO product is my favourite, but it's not too hard to find generic substitutes at any ...


9

It's odd that they force you to choose one, as many things in cooking have multiple reasons, e.g. browning meat adds flavour and colour to a stew. Are you sure the question isn't one of those 'tick all that apply' ones? In this case, the tomato paste adds flavour, colour, and the acid helps break down the connective tissue in the bones, which helps the ...


9

There isn't anything that is necessarily "bad" or should always be avoided in stock, but some ingredients have qualities you won't always want. Dark greens (spinach, kale, etc) can make a stock bitter and of course greenish in color. Cabbage also can impart a overwhelming bitterness. Potatoes can cloud a stock from their starchiness, so they are not good ...


8

I don't like ice cube trays as the only freezing method, simply because of portioning -- I typically make large batches of stock, and I only have so many ice cube trays. So I make a few different sizes, which are mostly just based on things I have, and so I have a variety of sizes when I need it: Gallon zip-top bags : fill about half way, close all but a ...


8

Really it's up to you. I generally cook mine for 4 hours, but you can cook it longer or shorter. Cooking it for a short time will lead to a lighter, less flavorful stock, and cooking for longer leads to a darker, richer stock. Once again, there's no right answer, but I believe 1.5 hours and 6 hours would be best.


8

If you heat some up, and add a little salt, does it taste good? Then its a successful stock. If you want it to be thicker/stronger, simmer it a while to reduce it. As SAJ14SAJ says, that's a fairly large amount of water vs. the amount of bones.


8

Taste the meat and if it still seems edible to you then there is no reason to throw it out. When I make stock, I keep it on a simmer for much longer than three hours and any meat is completely tasteless by the time I'm done. Three hours, however, is about how long you would cook meat to make a stew, so it's quite possible that you could eat it. On the ...


8

I can think of more than a few reasons... Wine is (relatively) expensive. Stock is normally supposed to be very inexpensive to make, using ingredients that you'd normally just throw out (bones, necks, etc.) Frugality is not the only reason to make a stock, but it seems like a waste of perfectly good wine. Stock gets to simmer for many, many hours. A lot of ...


8

There are several advantages to using a pressure cooker other than speed, the first of which address your concerns about skimming. If operated correctly the water in a pressure cooker will never come to the boil resulting in a clearer stock than one made by convention means. From Modernist Cuisine (2-291): The liquid inside the pressure cooker will not ...


7

Rendered beef fat can be used in a lot of ways. You can use it in place of oil in a lot of recipes, but finding out which ones you like will take some experimenting. Around our house, I use rendered fat from beef or bacon in place of oil when sautéing, for example with onions and peppers, garlic or mushrooms. I've also used it to add some kick to gravies. ...


7

I'm looking for the online reference, but I remember reading in Cook's Illustrated that they were able to substitute a bit of gelatin to mimic the mouth-feel of homemade stock. I did find a beef stew recipe that used gelatin. Based on how you described your recipe, I would say that the long cooking of chicken bones is indeed what's missing. You might get a ...


7

Any recipe where the water is part of a sauce or is expected to be absorbed (including rice, couscous, and yes, pasta too), you can use stock instead to increase the deliciousness. If you have an opportunity to add flavour, why waste it? Of course, there are some caveats to consider when making the substitution: Stock is going to contain a certain amount ...



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