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1

No, it's not safe, even withe a closed pressure cooker air must enter in order to equalize pressure. This goes for everything you cook: The temperature danger zone goes from 41f to 149f and you need to reach the bottom bound within these margins: 149f to 70f in 2 hours max 70f to 41f in 4 hours max After that you have to put the food in the fridge or the ...


-1

I've read a number of opinions since posting this and I have to say that I think the top answer is conservative to the point of absurdity. According to a strict reading of the FDA food safety rules, yes this stock should be considered a lethal poison. However there are a number of mitigating factors here, which I believe render this food completely safe. ...


1

A lot of the flavor comes from the marrow of the bone. Rib bones will need companion soup bones to help them. Alone, the flavor will seem weak or watered down. Now, if you are willing to put in the time.... Bake them first at 325f for an hour, let them cool and hit them with a hammer to crack them. you might want to cover them with a towel as not to send ...


3

No, it is not safe. As soon as a pressure cooker loses pressure it is not hermetically sealed. Stock, in particular, is often used as a culture medium in petri dishes to GROW bacteria. They love the stuff. Pressure cooking or pressure cookers do not confer magical powers to food - once the pressure is gone all the regular food handling rules apply: ...


-3

I often make a pressure cooked stock, turn off the gas, leave the pot alone (allowing the pressure to dissipate naturally), leave the lid undisturbed, and return to it the next day to strain, package and use or freeze. Depending on your altitude, the temperature inside your pressure cooker can reach 250 degrees F. This is well beyond the temperature to ...



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