New answers tagged

0

I'm not sure about a glue flavor (I kicked the habit in kindergarten ), but I made a stock with king mackerel bits, including the head and tail fin and it made an amazing base for gumbo. Be prepared for the smell to linger a bit though.


0

Nothing compares to well made home cooked stock. Almost all commercial stock flavors, cubes, boxed stock, better than pastes, College, Kitchen, Rachael, etc., come from one manufacturing plant. The basic difference is the salt content.


1

There's actually very little difference in cooking times between 15 and 12 psi. So if you get that mode working again, you would only need to make small adjustments. Here is a pressure cooking time table by PSI (use the cooking times in the "Electric Pressure Cooker 10-12 PSI" column even if your pressure cooker is stovetop) in the chart here - as you can ...


2

The gelatin has come out of the bones; I find a good chicken stock is often a bit gelatinous when cooled. As a general rule, when you cook stock for a really long time/on a higher heat, then it's likely to have a higher gelatin content (as it will reduce more and there is also more time for the gelatin to transfer from the bones to the stock liquid). ...


0

You know, I experimented with this a long time ago and these are my conclusions: Stews where you want to eat the meat, should NOT boil, because you ruin the cells before the tough stuff can gelatinise people translated this to stock, but you wont eat that meat (if any), so this is nonsense volatiles escaping when boiling in stead of simmering? difference ...


0

For regular stocks, the main difference is aesthetic: a boiled stock will be cloudy because broken down protein and fat are emulsified into the stock. Once emulsified, you won't be able to easily degrease the stock. The length of the boil and the temperature (in a pressure cooker for instance) will affect how much fat is emulsified and this can impact the ...


1

The problem is: Bought stocks tend to have a long ingredients list, and create a "shadow recipe" effect easily - important or problematic ingredients get carried into the dish via some bought product that they were arbitrarily mixed into, confusing recipe writers, learners, recipe followers alike. For example, a lot of vegetable stocks carry turmeric and ...


8

All excellent information, but can I answer bluntly: none of them come even CLOSE to the real thing. Once you use fresh stock, you will never, ever go back. Really. Making stock is easy, cheap, and as said above, unattended time. Stock forms the base of the kitchen, once you have it, you will notice the taste of everything you make improve so much. Get some ...


19

There's a great deal of variation in the quality of the pre-made stocks you get from different sources, so there's no clear-cut answer. Here's the types you might find: Stock cubes: these are dehydrated stock, or sometimes just chemicals meant to taste like it. It's the lowest quality option. There's a lot of variation here, I've found some brands (knorr ...


4

Quality varies. I have yet to find a store bought equivalent to homemade, but there are adequate products. It would be worth it to purchase a few samples and find one you like. I would look for something with little to no salt, as it is better to control for that yourself, in your final product. Having said that, making stock yourself, particularly using ...


0

If you just want a shrimp broth to serve as a soup with noodles etc the there is no need to reduce it a lot, just simmer it until you have the depth of flavour you want and then strain and serve. If you want to use it as the base for a sauce or bisque then it may be useful to reduce it to concentrate the flavour, however you will want to strain out the ...


2

After reducing the liquid to 50% at a low temp, I noticed no off flavours.


2

Remove anything you suspect might affect flavour negatively (or, more simply, strain the whole caboodle), then reduce to concentrate flavour. For fish broth, you shouldn't simmer the fish bones / heads for more than half an hour and I assume a similar rule applies for shrimp.


0

I think it was the salt content of the reduction? I guess salt interferes with gelatinisation of starch. I googled it and this is the best I can do: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11754347


0

Verjus (the non-fermented juice of unripened grapes) is going to be more acidic than wine, but I have been unable to find a number/concentration. Probably because a lot depends on the grapes at the time of harvest. The acidity of various vinegars also ranges, so comparing verjus to vinegar would require much more specificity of the types of products you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included