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6

It's fine. Vinaigrettes last pretty much indefinitely in the fridge. If the oil was exposed to too much light or air it might have become a little rancid. Smelling and tasting it before using it on the salad is a good idea. I wouldn't expect anything like that after just a couple months. Catija alluded to garlic above. Garlic in oil is dangerous because it ...


2

I was searching for something else, and saw an article on this in the Korean Journal of Food Science and Technology. Sadly it's in a journal I don't have access to, and it's in Korean, except for the abstract, which is: This study was designed to evaluate the changes in the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of Dutch coffee (cold ...


2

Simple: you can freeze it. Nut milks, especially homemade versions, can be frozen successfully. It doesn't seem to be a recommended practice according to commercial producers, but I would guess that's more to do with the emulsifiers and thickeners (typically lecithin or xanthan gum) used to improve the texture of commercially produced nut milks. Assuming ...


8

If the tea was distilled water, a 5% solution would have been sufficient. That is, you'd need 50 grams of acid to 950 grams of water. The problem is, the impurities of the water and the tea itself buffer it somewhat, so it's impossible to predict the exact amount you need. You'll have to use a pH meter, and an accurate one, not strips, to make a pH solution ...


1

Do you use any fats in your mix? On this page there is the suggestion that adding some fat -- say, 50g of butter or oil -- can extend shelf life. Fats (butter, oils, milk, eggs). Fats enrich and flavor the bread. They also soften the dough and preserve it: whereas a fat-free loaf of bread like a French bread goes stale after only a few hours, a loaf of ...


1

Lettuce can be prepped and stored for a few days, but you have to do one of three things: Store it completely submerged in water in the refrigerator. Drain it thoroughly before using/serving it. (ie, put it through a salad spinner the morning of ... of course, this might defeat the whole intent of the effort). Keep the heads whole, and don't cut them up ...


1

You can make salads that will keep in the refrigerator for a few days by avoiding vegetables that wilt and get soggy, such as lettuce. Instead, choose ingredients that will withstand or benefit from prolonged marination. For example: Cabbage Beets Celery Bell Peppers Carrots Tomatoes Cucumbers I often make a cole slaw salad consisting of cabbage, green ...


1

-Make slaws of hardier vegetables - bell peppers, carrots, unripe papaya, hard cabbages. Both kinds - the ones that are slightly cooked with a boiling vinaigrette, or the ones prepared raw (som tam for example) , can last a few days in the fridge. -Pickles tend to be a hardy ingredient. -Keep a cold but not freezing fridge (I recently started a discussion ...


1

Answering from personal experience: Mine are in the freezer now for 5+ months, and don't show any sign of degradation. Not in smell, not in texture, not in color, not in taste. I expect them to be like that for some time to come.


2

Leaving the bread out uncovered overnight is likely one of the larger issues with staling. All bread will start to stale immediately after it's come out of the oven -- commercial bread simply has other ingredients to help slow this effect. (and I know we've had a question on this topic) They also package the bread in plastic to hold moisture near the loaf ...


3

I assume you're trying to extend shelf life for a couple of days, not weeks. One possibility is dough enhancers, many of which improve shelf life. Most can be very easily incorporated into an existing bread machine recipe. There are a variety of possibilities, and you can also buy commercially available dough enhancers that combine various helpful additives ...


0

A few options: Add a bit (or a bit more) sugar to the dough. Use a sourdough starter instead of yeast. The ideas in Sourdough in Bread Maker? might be helpful. Add lupin flour, as mentioned in "Why add lupin flour to white bread?" Store in a paper bag. If you're not using a breadmaker, leaving the dough overnight to have the yeast really do their job ...


0

Freezing is a great way to preserve food for many months, but not for any longer than 1 year to prevent freezer burn or moisture and flavor loss. It is a good idea to prevent bacteria growth by only reheating food once, so avoid keeping any leftover reheated soup by refreezing or refrigerating. Freezing in small batches, and reheating for that meal can ...


1

Its less that the simple act of cooking it at home causes shorter life of the product and more that at-home cooks are cooking for the sake of avoiding the chemicals and preservatives that are what give the commercially made things their long shelf life. In some cases it is preservatives (sulfates in dried fruit (I think)), in some cases it is an extra ...



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