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1

I appreciate these answers and comments, but I found some help at a different website. As it seems to answer the part of my question about cooked ginger, I'm posting it as an answer, but I've never done this before, so please correct me if I've posted it incorrectly or if it should have been a comment. The Frugal Chef ...


0

You need all the information on the label to assess a wine. the vintage in only part of it. The fridge is not a good wine cellar. wines deteriorate quickly there. ultimately, it is all educated guess work anyway. It might not have been good in 2004. try it. if you like it, serve it. if not, flush it.


1

I have just enjoyed some of my 20+ year old cut comb honey from our own bees. Although dark in colour, it was excellent


2

I suggest freezing it in oil (so that ice crystals do not form), according to the following procedure: Acquire a sealable plastic container, such as Tupperware, just a bit larger than the total amount of space (volume) the stored cheese will occupy. Obviously you're not limited to the configuration you described. But this method will preserve the cheese ...


0

If you're talking about raw kombucha (rather than pasteurized) then the answer is yes, inevitably, in the sense that it loses its desired probiotic properties. The kombucha will start to grow its own culture (though small), more commonly referred to as a mother or a scoby, which forms at the top of the bottle (container) and in time will take on both the ...


-2

What about freezing the eggs in separate containers? Daily portions, thaw one the night before and cook it in the morning. Microwave if you have it. Would this work?


1

When they say "probiotic", what they mean is that there are microbe cultures present in the kombucha. It's really nothing more than a sweetened tea which has been fermented by a symbiotic mix of yeast and bacteria. The odor and distinctive flavor is the result of a low alcohol content and acetic acid (the same acid found in vinegar) produced by the ...


4

The "best before" date is usually way out. Cut it in slices that you will use within a week. Still Tasty recommends that you use opened, refrigerated cream cheese within a couple of weeks. Very well packed (well wrapped or preferably vacuum packed) cream cheese really should last longer than that. I'd try for keeping a month's worth, refrigerated, in well ...


2

I just found a pack of Sun-maid that were dated 05 04 00. Opened them up & tried a couple , not too bad . And not hard at all.


1

Well we just opened up a vacuum seeped container of honeycomb with honey. Always heard that honey doesn't go bad so we dug in. It was so bitter and the comb virtually disintigrated. So, we knew honey is good basically forever but honeycomb IS NOT! I am just really hoping we don't get sick.


2

When you buy the sliced meat, take out what you'll use in two days and freeze the rest. If you put wax paper in between portions that you would eat in one serving, or use separate baggies, you only need to pull out what you need. The package might recommend against freezing (for best quality, not safety), but a week or two in the freezer will cause no harm ...


1

It may be fine if you eat the ham after two days but there might be a slightly higher risk to get food poisoning. There is a question/answer here in Seasoned Advice which deals with shelf lives of food in general and luncheon meat in particular, too. It says that the meat is fine after a week.


0

I have been eating the same container of black olives for about 3 months. They keep for a LONG time, in fact I've never had any go bad. I keep them in an air dealer container in the fridge. I eat a few here and there and use for cooking. My 15 month old LOVES to eat them like grapes as well. They will keep for months, just smell them before ingesting, you'll ...



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