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I have a Hario Cold Brewer, which doubles as a pitcher and does not seal. I have a batch in my fridge for around 5-7 days. When I tried it, it was definitely rancid. Id say 2 days if the container isn't air tight.


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In the refridgerator they last for years. A lot longer than you might think.


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I'd recommend only keeping vinaigrette for 7 days or less (refrigerated, of course). It's not that difficult and you'll be avoiding a lot of quality and safety issues. Another thing you need to be aware of is that raw garlic can cause botulism, which can result in hospitalization and death. I think close relatives of garlic, such as shallots also contain ...


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Deep freezing meats crystallizes and damages the quality of meats. Sure it lets it sit in your freezer for a long long time but we live in the year 2016. We have meat readily available. Do this test: take a roast of any type home, pork butt, chuck roast, etc..., seal it up however you like then deep freeze and a week later pull it out and thaw it. Open ...


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For milk-alternatives, they're typically the same product (there may be exceptions), but they're often sold chilled for the following reasons: Marketing: Chilled products are typically perishable foods and therefore perceived to be fresher and of higher quality. Consumers will usually make the same assumption for any product sold chilled. Familiarity vs. ...


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Some formulations of dextrins can extend shelf life, though that's only kind-of-sort-of a sugar solution. One example is MoisturLok, which is primarily aimed at preventing staling, but its ability to reduce available water also lowers microbial counts on baked goods over a few days.


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In addition to Stephie's safety answer, there is another reason: Many foods undergo undesirable flavor or texture changes due to reacting with the oxygen in the air (oxidation), losing or gaining moisture to the air, etc. Before you open the package, that's prevented by the air-tight seal and possibly by the air in the jar not actually being air (e.g., it ...


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I'll use (cow) milk as an example, but the idea is the same for other products like juices and fake milks. In the case of milk, the milk you get in tetrapak cartons (shelf stable milk) is ultra-high temperature pasteurized (UHT). It is heated briefly (1 to 2 seconds) to over 135 C then cooled down very quickly to kill bacteria and spores and then filled ...


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The canning process makes food safe: existing bacteria and fungi are killed, the intrusion of new pathogens is prevented by sealing the container. (More e.g. here.) As soon as you open the can or jar, its contents are exposed to the surrounding air which will contain bacteria and fungal spores. Some of those will happily grow feeding on the food they land ...


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The product is sterilised during packaging. When you open it, bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere will contaminate it and begin to degrade it.


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It's easy for me to tell how it smells. Trust me it smells like pigeon. I had an craft made up of flour. Once that was rotten, it started to smell. When ever I entered the room, I felt like a pigeon had been there already, but then I discovered that craft stank so bad, I had to take it out since it was the source.


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My wife freezes bananas since we buy so many for our two year old and they always taste perfect even after weeks. The peel practically gets frozen and prevents any freezer burn flavor!



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