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I would try to keep the vegetable whole as long as possible. Cut them up in manageable size chunks instead of blending them (except for the tomatoes and leaf vegetables). When wanting to make a smoothy, just pick some pre-cut vegetables and throw them in the blender. You could also par-boil most of the veggies and freeze them up. If wanting to blend them ...


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Eggs keep fine for two weeks just fine raw in the shell and about abit over a week cooked into a fritta shape, 25 sec in a microwave works wonders


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There is no reason why this thing will extend shelf life with regard to food safety. It is by no means comparable to canning, where you first sterilize the food and then ensure that there is some vacuum in the jar, as a sign that the jar is not exchanging atmosphere with the outside environment (which would bring in contamination with new microbes). ...


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It's true that keeping air away from most foods will increase their shelf-life, but so-called "vacuum" food containers can't possibly create a powerful enough vacuum to remove all the air. I would be suspicious of glowing reviews with wild claims of their effectiveness. For the purpose you described, I think you would be much better off using a good quality ...


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To a certain extent, it depends on the condiment. For things like oil or vinegar, where germs generally can't really survive anyway, there is no need for refrigeration. On the other hand, things like ketchup, mayonnaise, or any other emulsions (tahini for instance) should be kept in the fridge. It also depends on whether the pack is sealed or has come into ...


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Run a search for something called "Snap-Ware." Tough, durable, airtight, and very stable plastic. It's even recommended by David Suzuki as a storage medium. Granted, a lot of people consider him alarmist, but he knows his stuff when it comes to bisphenol-A and neoestrogens. I've been using the same Snap-Ware containers for 13 years, and not one has broken, ...


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Maybe after we have inspected the raisins, and they still look good, (have no mold whatsoever, using a magnifying glass), we can use them in baking of cookies, cakes, etc. In fact, just to make sure, we can probably boil them first (to soften them), and then add the drained raisins to our cookie, cake, etc. batter. Just a thought. I have a package of boxed ...


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Fine, you're crazy. There's no time savings in shelling a lot of eggs at once .vs. shelling them as you need them, and there is a HUGE loss of storage life. Once removed from the shell, 2-4 days is the official word, so a week - no. http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/eggstorage.html http://www.incredibleegg.org/cooking-school/tips-tricks/egg-storage/ ...



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