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7

This is a basic fact of food safety. It doesn't matter how long each of the ingredients take to go bad separately. Prepared food will go bad soon unless you do something special to preserve it. In your case, you had hazelnuts, which don't go bad because 1) they have too little water, and 2) bacteria cannot enter their tissue, which is made of intact cell ...


6

The answer, briefly, is no -- freezing will not make your water safe to drink. Freezing does damage living cells, mostly because water expands when freezing, and ice crystals can break the cell walls. Thus, some bacteria will be killed by freezing. And many larger organisms (e.g., parasites, pests) will often be killed by freezing. Long-term freezing can ...


5

Canning I've been looking up canning, as I suspected it had much to do with the process of noodles not absorbing all the water. I've found this tangentially related post and quoting: You CAN can pasta yourself. It is not difficult but, like the commercial caners [sic] you will need to make sure it is high acid (they add flavorless citric acid) but using ...


5

Anything airtight is fine. If the sheets will fit in a Ziploc, that would be perfect. Another option that would certainly be big enough is a bread bag, well sealed. If you still have the box the pasta came in, you can put the bag inside the box to give the pasta a small measure of protection against breakage. I checked with Still Tasty and they didn't have ...


4

Any standard pasta recipe (basically flour, salt, water or egg) should do. Unless stated otherwise, fresh pasta can be cooked right away or dried and stored for months. Cooking time will vary, of course, with fresh pasta done in a few minutes, dried in roughly the same range as store bought. When drying pasta, use the same aproach as for laundry: ...


3

As previously mentioned, any pasta recipe can be dried out. Semolina only pasta will dry harder and faster than one with eggs. If you use spinach or other colorful ingredients, they can fade with time or sunlight. Lets talk equipment. Even a single pound of pasta takes a surprising amount of room to dry. Cleaned, upturned barstools, oven racks, ...


3

There's no difference between the stem or blossom end, you should save the end which looks and feels in the best shape.


2

Freezing does not generally kill bacteria, or even yeasts. There are entire industries which rely on that fact.


2

This was going to be my first comment on Seasoned Advice, but after reading the preface about writing answers, I'm wondering if 55 years of every-day family cooking qualifies me. Forging ahead fearlessly and with nothing to back me up except personal habit, save the root ends of onions, the blossom ends of cukes and tomatoes.


1

It's very likely that any benefit gained by doing this will be completely destroyed by the act of cutting into the protective skin of the fruit. Once you do this, you're exposing the interior skin and the fruit itself to microbes in the air, which will be more than happy to colonize and eat away (i.e. rot) the banana you were trying to preserve. If you ...


1

How do you know it is grease? I have a tv remote and the whole back of the remote is sticky from being stored in a south TX RV.



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