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It is best to seal cheese in a Ziploc bag with the air pushed out with a damp cloth over the cheese to prevent it from hardening, then seal. Hard cheeses can have the crusted dried out part cut away and the rest is still good to eat. Cheese is best served at room temperature so be sure to cut what you would eat in one sitting and put the rest in the fridge ...


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I watched a survival show once and the presenter showed that melting wax and encasing the already opened cheese in wax would keep it safe for eating.


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Sealed hard cheeses will indeed keep forever at 15 Celsius and below, unsealed they can go mouldy or so dry you can't cut them. Soft cheeses can't be stored past their expiration date, they are a perishable product. (As always, the "freezer stops the clock" rule applies, but you already said you don't like the resulting texture). In short, unless you ...


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I've lived in tropical climates for many years. We stored things like rusks, cookies, biscuits, and the like in air-tight containers. I'd have a large air-tight container for keeping large quantities in which is only opened infrequently, then a smaller one that stores smaller quantities for more frequent access. It's not perfect, but it does mean these ...


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There is nothing you can do about the food and keep it the same. So you will have to change the environment. The easiest way would be to get a fridge capable of supporting temperatures in the 15 to 20 Celsius range and use it as a pantry. It will be cool, dark and dry, so the ideal pantry environment. If you have the space, you can choose to keep it in your ...


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We buy large cans at home just like you do. We prevent it from spoiling by freezing it. Stored in the freezer the paste stays good for months, it's just a matter of correct storage. What we do is the following: spoon a portion into a plastic bag -> twist the bag around several times -> tie off with a tierib (we use the thingies you get in the package with ...


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Tomato paste is very concentrated, you often don't need more than a spoon. 500g or 1kg cans are really for commercial purposes where you will go through it quickly. The only way to store it long term is to freeze it, so you could parcel it up in single use bags I suppose. I'd suggest getting smaller cans you will get through, or buy it in a tube. Tubed ...


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There is no way to stop it. The storage lifetime of opened tomato paste is 5-7 days (you can check storage lifetime at StillTasty). You have to buy smaller packages of the paste.


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-24°C will usually be chest freezers, not uprights. -18°C seems to be generally considered to be cold enough that even new-old-stock mammoth would still be safe, albeit a little dry. The only caveat is auto-defrosting systems in some freezers, they raise the temperature periodically (check the documentation for your model of freezer).


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There is not one magical temperature that is optimal for all frozen foods. Even after manufacturing and before the product ends up in your shopping cart, the products have all been stored at a minimum of 3 different temperatures of cold warehouse storage.


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The advice for storing raw potatoes is because they are still "alive" in a sense. By storing them in the cold, you are telling them it is winter and they should be converting their stored starch into sugar so they can grow in the spring. Once you've cooked them, that's no longer a problem - you've killed them, so the conversion isn't going to happen any ...


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Cook's Illustrated recommends storing lemons in the fridge in a tightly sealed ziptop bag with the excess air removed. I would imagine that the same applies to limes. As I understand it, the idea is to prevent air circulation in order to reduce the rate of dehydration. Ref at thekitchn.com


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Put almost all your herbs and leaves in the freezer if you want to keep them for more than 2-3 days. Either in a tight sealed container or ziplock bags. Keep them dry (eg. between layers of kitchen paper as suggested in the comments) so it's easy to separate them when you want to take out some and leave the rest. Some herbs like cilantro or softer basils ...



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