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I'd recommend just cooking them sooner rather than later. If you had to do anything, I'd consider cracking & brushing off the surface ice without thawing them, then vacuum sealing them ... but still try to use them quickly. If the texture is a little off, or the flavor a little lacking, you can always use the rest in either soup or a casserole, where ...


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I have another solution: you could use grapeseed oil instead. It doesn't solidify when refridgerated. It's what I use for all my dressing needs :)


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I was a food service specialist. The danger zone is 40°F to 140°F (4°C to 60°C). Food can be kept in the danger zone no more then 4 hours. That being said it would be fine to leave in the oven until your guest arrive with the oven turned off after backing. Reheat at 350 for 1/2 hour before serving. Your lasagna wouldn't be in the danger zone 4 hours.


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Everything that doesn't take damage from being at fridge temperature will last longer in the fridge, because both biological (spoilage or fermentation) and chemical (well described in the so called arrhenius equation) processes are slowed. Now could a bar like that take damage (assuming you don't put it in a part of a fridge where it might freeze and suffer ...


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The expiration date on dry goods is an indication of quality, rather than safety. Closet or fridge...in this case probably doesn't matter.



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