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I microwave the honey in 30 second increments until it melts back to a usable state. It works fine and doesn't recrystallize for a couple of weeks. Then I microwave again.


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For ripe peaches the main thing is avoid handling them. They bruise very easily. I leave them in the box and just slide the box in a shelf in the fridge. You are only going to get a few days out of them. Never in a drawer as too much handling. Don't stack. Dry. I would never wrap or seal to keep mold down but that part is more opinion than hard ...


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Sorry no good answer to keeping calzones dry and crisp on a steam table, even if you wrapped it in foil. You may need to look at other equipment, such as heat lamp, food warmer or a food merchandiser/heated display (eg Pie, pizza display box )


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No, not much of a quality difference as you usually only want to eat fish within 1-2 days of it being caught. The main quality difference is the skill of the person filleting the fish. (IMO it's not that hard to get a grip in fish anatomy/filleting. There are two main types: Round and Flat fish) One consideration, if you eat the skin from the fillet and ...


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I'd say it depends on the type of fish, and how you plan cooking it. I prefer scaling and cleaning the fish before freezing. This way I'm only storing what I will be eating and have no need to worry about additional smells and bacteria in the freezer and whilst defrosting.


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It is best to seal cheese in a Ziploc bag with the air pushed out with a damp cloth over the cheese to prevent it from hardening, then seal. Hard cheeses can have the crusted dried out part cut away and the rest is still good to eat. Cheese is best served at room temperature so be sure to cut what you would eat in one sitting and put the rest in the fridge ...


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I watched a survival show once and the presenter showed that melting wax and encasing the already opened cheese in wax would keep it safe for eating.



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