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In my experience, you're going to get a lot of degradation with pre-ground coffee regardless of the steps you take to protect it. As mentioned in other posts (ex: What is the best way to store ground coffee?) you're looking to do the following: Prevent the coffee as much as possible from contact with air. Avoid moisture absorption (from air). Avoid ...


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I appreciate these answers and comments, but I found some help at a different website. As it seems to answer the part of my question about cooked ginger, I'm posting it as an answer, but I've never done this before, so please correct me if I've posted it incorrectly or if it should have been a comment. The Frugal Chef ...


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The scientific reason? Not without seeing your specimen. (wink, wink) Seriously, unlike cut flowers and other herbs like sage or rosemary, parsley is simply not happy in water for more than a couple of days, especially towards the end of the growing season and/or if it had been harvested some time ago. Nothing to do with the water, although that should be ...


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It is NOT necessary to store coffee in the freezer. It can be helpful if you want to store it for long periods - i.e. months. Ground coffee should NOT be thawed and re-frozen, nor opened frequently and put-back in the freezer. Think of your freezer as long-term storage, and take out a week's worth of coffee at a time. Also, it's not going to make a ...


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We had the same problem and it turned our to be due to the temperature changes in the fridge. The expansion/contraction cycle of the syrup made it drip. Does your sauce require refrigeration? If not, try leaving it at room temperature (which doesn't change as much as most fridges). We used a "min/max" memory thermometer for a few days and found that the ...


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I totally agree with Caleb that I don't believe they ever really go bad. Of course, once they get moldy, you can maybe draw the line, but for my banana bread and cakes, I prefer to let them get completely and utterly black. I even deliberately wait for them to develop the banana liquor that gives such a depth and richness to my baked goods. After they get ...


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If I understand this article correctly, it's because of how the two different types of olives are made, and packaged safely. Most olives are green at first and then turn black/purple when they are ripe. Most black olives that are sold at the grocery store have been ripened artificially with certain substances/chemicals. These chemicals apparently are a good ...


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I have been eating the same container of black olives for about 3 months. They keep for a LONG time, in fact I've never had any go bad. I keep them in an air dealer container in the fridge. I eat a few here and there and use for cooking. My 15 month old LOVES to eat them like grapes as well. They will keep for months, just smell them before ingesting, you'll ...



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