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33

Honey is entirely useable after crystallization. This is a natural and spontaneous process and doesn't affect the honey negatively in terms of flavor or quality. It's dependent upon the sugar content of the particular honey, and in particular the crystallization speed is determined by: the nectar source collected by bees (the sugar composition of honey), ...


11

Yes, it's bad for basically everything. Oils, of any variety, will go rancid much faster there. It'll be most obvious for the least stable ones, but they'll all go eventually. And if you've ever accidentally cooked something with rancid oil, you'll know, it's not a pleasant surprise. Anything aromatic will degrade a lot faster too. Even before your olive ...


11

Crystals breed crystals, so once a sugary substance starts to crystallize, it will seem to crystallize very rapidly. Gently warm it in a water bath or the microwave and the crystals will dissolve. This is very common with "raw" honey, but it happens with processed honey as well. It's normal.


10

Yes, oxygen (and sunlight) can affect the quality of oil. The oil turns rancid after some time. And storing the oil in a really airtight container (like a can from which air has been evacuated before sealing) should prevent or at least slow the process. However, the problem is that you can't practically store your oil in an airless container and still use ...


8

Summer sausage is cooked in the smoking process, and fermented, which kills bacteria and gives it a long fridge life. Some summer sausages don't even require refrigeration until opened! Wet, raw sausage, on the other hand, is asking for trouble. I'm sure your husband will forgive your fussiness when you bring him kielbasa and a nice chunk of aged cheddar, ...


8

I would suggest using a can punch. Punch a hole on both of the shorter sides on top, one to pour with and the other to allow air flow. If you are unsure what a can punch is.... here is a pic Hope this helps.


7

The baking soda and acid from the dried buttermilk should not react in any significant amount until you hydrate the mixture, so it should work. Remember, baking powder is acid and sodium bicarbonate in the same can, and there is little except acid and reactant; your mix will have a lot of buffer ingredients as well. I would not add the oil to the dry mix ...


6

This waxy coating is called epicuticular wax, as it forms the cuticle of the fruit. It is essentially paraffin. It acts to both seal in moisture and keep out fungi, dirt and microorganisms. As rumtscho suggests in her comment, even if you could prevent it from forming, it's not a good idea for obvious reasons: it does no harm and keeps the apples fresher ...


6

Anything will spoil more quickly if cut than if whole. It's all a matter of surface area. The bacteria/fungi/mold/whatever can only attack the surface that is open to the air. When you cut the mushrooms, you open more surface up to attack, and hence they will be affected more quickly. This is equally true for dehydration and loss of flavour (by ...


6

As you can see at the Chapter 7: Storage of horticultural crops of the book PDF: Small-Scale Postharvest Handling Practices: A Manual for Horticultural Crops (4th Edition): If you look p.166 (p.173 on the PDF), you can see that the onions need to be stored in this conditions: between 0-5°C with a relative humidity (R.H.) of 65-70% If you look p.168 ...


6

I don't think I've ever seen peanut butter grow mold, natural or commercial, refrigerated or not. What will happen with natural peanut butter is that the fat (of which there's plenty) will go rancid over time. The oxidation process that leads to rancidity requires heat, light, and usually oxygen; keeping it in the refrigerator will therefore slow the ...


6

Restaurants solve this problem one of two ways: Tough, professional-grade stainless or Lexan containers. I suggest 4" to 6" deep 1/6 size hotel pans AKA steam table inserts, or lidded 2-4 quart Cambro containers. Cheap, disposable quart delitainers. These are actually reusable and dishwasher/microwave safe, but at $0.25-0.50 apiece, it doesn't matter ...


6

Ideally, you'd store all meat tightly wrapped and/or in air-tight containers. Further, you'd store the meat on the bottom shelf of the fridge, and the ready-to-eat food above it—just in case the meat leaks juices out, it won't be able to drip onto the ready-to-eat foods. That's perfectly safe, and indeed is what's required in a commercial fridge. The idea ...


6

The wrap used in most grocery stores isn't the same as your household wrap. Most of the consumer brands of plastic "cling" wrap are now formulated from low-density polyethylene. It's rolled very thin to give you the best price per unit of length, and has reasonable stickyness. Most stores use a product called "meat film" which is most commonly made from ...


6

The general prescription for water bottles is to recycle them, not reuse them. According to a University of Virginia paper: Reuse of polycarbonate plastic bottles is generally not recommended by commercial bottled water manufacturers, as it may pose a health risk from two perspectives. First, everyday wear and tear from repeated washings and reuse ...


6

The main problem with storing pre-cut potatoes is oxidation, where they start to turn brown from contact with the air. To prevent this, store them submerged in water. You can get about 24 hours, refrigerated, in this manner. This is is how restaurants that do natural cut fries store the pre-cut fries.


5

No, it will not react. There is a bit of theory behind it. The reaction in batter is a reaction between a base and an acid. For this type of reaction, you need ions swimming freely in water. In dried substances, your ions are stuck to other ions to form molecules, or ion gitters, depending on the substance. They cannot react with anything, just like a pen ...


4

For storage, the biggest issue is whether you have a high-quality thick plastic bag that will prevent oxygen incursion. Have a few small bubbles inside isn't a big deal, whether you use the water method or a vacuum. But cheaper/thinner bags will allow oxygen in over time, and your bag will start to separate from the food, and you'll start to see ice ...


4

Theory 1: moisture Were the leaves wet at all? I worked in a restaurant before, tending to the fridge. I had to make sure the salads were washed and thoroughly spun. Wet greens wilted and rotted faster and we had to toss them. The roots can be wet and exposed to water, but make sure the leaves stay dry. Theory 2: freezer burn This link mentions that ...


4

After punching through a bunch of brittle plastic containers myself, I bought a set of 25 paperboard quart containers from Sweet Bliss, and like them very much. The lid design is especially nice, using a second piece of card inside the lid with holes cleverly placed to push air out of the containers. On their website they say: In 1996, my husband and ...


4

I usually buy green, hard avocados to use them in a couple of weeks. When I'm looking for an almost ready avocado for my guacamole at the supermarket, I look for a not-so-hard one and pop off the stem: this is a tip I found over the internet and it really works. Pulp under the stem should be greenish and not brown or dark, otherwise it's probably rotten. You ...


4

The best storage depends on the particular confection: Refrigerate (in a sealed container to not pick up orders or absorb water): Ganache Soft caramel Cool dry storage, again in an air-tight container to minimize changes in moisture level: Candied citrus peal Nuts - Dry storage Marzipan Raisins and other dry fruits Fondant Hard caramel or toffee ...


4

It's really difficult to answer, as there are way too many variables. Which vegetable? What is being done to it before storage? What will be done to it after storage? Is it closer to 3 days, or 5 days? For instance, let's look at carrots, one of the items that you mentioned. Cut carrots can be stored in water, in the fridge, and they'll do just fine ... ...


4

The official answer is generally only a few days for meat in the fridge ... Ham can be different, as it's salt cured, so depending on the salt content can last longer without freezing it. As for freezing it, it really depends on how you plan to use it: It's most convenient to cut it up in the same way that you're going to use it, so that you can just ...


4

According to Home Barista, freezing coffee is pretty controversial. He has, however, performed blind tasting experiments and concludes (emphasis added): Two months is safe: Freshly roasted coffee that is immediately frozen after roasting in a near airtight container in a very cold freezer, can be kept undisturbed in the freezer for at least 2 ...


4

They will technically last a long time in the freezer - up to many months - but this is not the best way to store them as they lose flavor quickly (as little as 5-6 uses). Even though the beans will last, storing them in the freezer is not ideal. It affects flavor for a number of reasons. (See below) If you haven't opened the bag, store the bag in the ...


4

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


4

It is almost certainly safe unless it was left out at warm temperatures to spoil, or has molded, or otherwise spoiled in a manner not directly related to being uncovered. It may, however, be unpalatable due to: Drying out Picking up flavors or odors from other items in the refrigerator Since you are eating it relatively quickly, if you are not ...


4

There is no reason that they should be harmed in any way by their sojourn under refrigeration. In fact, since the rate of chemical reactions is directly related to temperature, their shelf life may have been slightly extended. You can move it to dry stores. While there are some circumstances where very fresh mayonnaise should be kept at room temperature, ...


4

If the wheel is intact, 2 or 3 days at room temperature will be fine. Hard cheeses like that are aged at temperatures not far below normal room temperature. If the wheel were cut, if the temperature got above room temperature or if you were asking about a longer period of time, I might be slightly concerned. But in your situation, your cheese will be fine. ...



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