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25

A regular electric oven uses a large coiled resistor as a heating element. A large electric current is passed through this element which generates heat, similar to the tungsten filament of an incandescent light bulb. An induction stove doesn't actually generate heat itself, but rather induces it the pot or pan. It does this using a rapidly oscillating ...


16

The burners on essentially all electric stoves are binary in that they are either fully on, or fully off. It would be more expensive and less energy efficient to use electronics that continuously vary the current flow through an electric element, and this would make no significant difference in temperature behavior at the cooking surface. Instead, electric ...


14

Where do you live? European Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the same as in laboratory's equipment; American Pyrex is made from common soda-lime glass. If you are in America, don't bother trying it at all; soda-lime glass is sensitive to thermal shock. Even though it's tempered for kitchenware, it is nowhere near good enough for the burner. In ...


13

As far as I can tell what you don't do is pour the batter onto the pan. What you do do is dip the warmed pan into batter (I'd think you stick just the cooking surface into the batter, not the whole thing) and put it back on your burner to cook a crepe quickly. See the product description on this convex pan on amazon and this vintage pan on ebay for where I ...


13

Flick water on the pan. If it just sits there, it's not hot enough. If it combines into balls and skates around on the pan, it's either too hot or just right for a wok or blackening something. If it sizzles and evaporates within a couple of seconds, it should be good for a normal sautee or sweat.


12

We have recently remodelled our kitchen and moved from a gas hob to an induction hob. In general it cooks much the same as gas and you get similar levels of control over the temperature. One style of cooking that is not recommended is 'slide' cooking as this will likely scratch your hob surface - this can be mitigated by putting a piece of parchment paper ...


11

Use a large heavy-bottomed pot (idealy 3-4 quart size) and place it over medium to medium-high heat until you can hold your hand about 6 inches above the bottom surface and feel the heat radiating off it. At that point add about 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to the pan, tilting to coat the bottom evenly. Drop in a kernel or two and cover. When the ...


10

Use a carbon-steel wok! The shape works very well to keep the unpopped kernels in the hot oil, while the popped kernels end up on the cooler sides. I usually use about 2 T of oil and 1/3 c of popcorn to make enough for two people. If you want to keep with the Chinese theme, Szechuan peppercorn-salt goes extremely well on popcorn! To make it, grind Szechuan ...


9

From the PyrexLove FAQ: Is it all right to use my vintage Pyrex directly on the stove? We’d like to just nip this one in the bud and say - NO. Some pieces actually say “Not for stovetop”, but we never put vintage pyrex bowls, casseroles or whatever directly on the stove, ever. You can try it, but we’d rather not risk it. But we do get a ...


8

Can I convince you that electric is better? No, I can't, because I don't think it is. The issue I have is related to how long it takes to warm up (and cool down). Electric cook tops just don't respond quickly. Little too hot? Too bad, nothing you can do about it (in time to save a dish that's starting to burn anyway). Not hot enough? Check back in 2 or 3 ...


8

Short answer: no, there's no standard scale. First of all, I'm pretty sure it's common enough for stoves of varying power to use the same range of numbers. I see an awful lot of stoves that go up to 10 in the US, and I'm quite confident they're not all the same. Second, the real property of a stove is its power output, not its temperature. You can clearly ...


8

In the oven, that heat is coming from all directions more or less equally. On the stovetop, the heat is coming only from the bottom. This can potentially cause convection, and almost certainly requires occasional stirring (especially for larger batches), meaning that the ingredients are being moved around. The combination of the ingredients being heated more ...


7

Yes. It's much more fun to cook with gas, and the way I see it, any incentive I can provide for myself to cook good food at home is a major net positive in quality of life. The setup I have is three gas burners and one electric stove top element, and an electric oven. The electric stove top really comes in handy when reducing stocks or making long-cooking ...


7

My name is Tom Wirt, with Clay Coyote Pottery. I'll try to shed some light on the intricacies of clay cooking pots, especially tagines. You can use any flameware tagine directly on the glass stovetop. This includes, Emile Henry, Le Crueset, and Clay Coyote flameware. These are pots with either a metal base (Le Crueset) , or a type of ceramic called ...


6

All these answers are basically correct. Something to add. I have found that covering the bottom of whatever pan you are using (except the wok or other round bottoms) with kernels (so that the kernels are evenly distributed and there are no kernels on top of one another) just so it is covered, but no more, the volume of corn, once popped, is close to the ...


6

Well, with an electric you get Modestly less fire hazard No gas leak hazard but I'd generally take gas.


6

I found it is much easier to keep the heat quite low with an electric stove. As for a quick response when the pot is too hot, just slide it off the burner. This is particularly easy with the flat tops.


6

Stove tops: Cook by conduction; Send most of the heat to the surface of the food (good for searing, bad for thorough cooking); Can be adjusted very quickly, unless they're glass-top; Can cook food very quickly, because conduction is a very efficient method of heat transfer. Conventional ovens: Cook primarily by radiation, unless steaming or simmering ...


6

You are relying on very different forms of heat. Conduction vs Convection vs Radiation Heat transfer, and the first law of thermodynamics Principles of Cooking Basic Cooking Methods What happens when you heat something? A number of things. Proteins Coagulate Starches Gelatinize Sugars Caramelize Water Evaporates Fats Melt Depending on how you cook ...


6

The main difference is speed that it changes temperature. So when you turn the hob on it is at the heat you turned it to almost immediately, if you turn it down it is cooler that second. This won't take long to get used to but if you have recipes which say something along the lines of "Bring to the boil before reducing to a simmer" you can now do exactly ...


6

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


6

I strongly advise against doing it. I tried stovetop seasoning at home and got terrible results. A stove gives you hot spots - on gas, this will be the ring where the flame touches the metal. The temperature of the metal in this hot spot is way too high, and the oil burns instead of polymerizing. You get some oil-charcoal in this place, which doesn't have ...


5

What the others say is true, but ABSOLUTELY NOT TRUE for an electric induction cooker!! I used to think gas was better until I also moved into a flat with no gas. I was soon sick of it but I discovered induction and changed the basic electric cooker for an induction one. Now I know that an induction cooker is even better than gas because: It responds ...


5

I find it amusing that your range warns you the cooking ring will work as intended. It's supposed to be heat trap, and focus heat on the bottom of the wok. That said, they are also correct that it may discolor the burner grate. I can't really say what your grates are made from, and many cooking materials discolor at high temperatures. I think the main ...


5

* edit * Oh, I see now that you're asking how hot should the pan be before even adding oil. Two things to keep in mind... You want the pan just hot enough to be certain that all moisture is gone from the surface of the pan. Otherwise, the oil could splatter suddenly as it gets hotter and the moisture on the pan vaporizes. If the pan is already hot, the ...


5

It looks like your standard advice is to use a diffuser. The need for a diffuser when used in conjunction with any electric cook top seems pretty universal across all tangine material types while browsing other manufacturers sites. Diffusers come in various materials ranging from tin, to steel, to aluminized steel, and cast iron. The Nordic steel ...


5

They don't correspond to a temperature, they correspond to a rate of heat input. The elements in your oven are connected to a thermostat with regulates their temperature, they are really constant heat/fixed temperature devices, like the heat in your home. The oven turns the elements on and off to regulate temperature, but the elements are only ever ON or ...


4

Good electric stoves often put out the same or more power (BTUs/hr) than gas stoves, and they are more efficient at transmitting the heat, as it is via conduction not radiation. This means that on a good electric stove, water will boil faster, heavy pans will heat up faster, etc. By a "good electric stove" I mean one that does not have a glass pane over ...



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