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10

You can put things in the cavity to help flavor the chicken as well. A bundle of fresh herbs, garlic, an onion, fresh fruit, etc. Stuffing from a cavity is divine though, don't knock it until you've tried it!


6

I am firmly in the "stuffing is evil" camp... but lets take that as read :-) If you absolutely must have in the bird stuffing, here is a link to a (I hope legal) excerpt of Alton Brown's Good Eats, showing his technique for doing turkey with stuffing: http://www.aol.com/video/alton-browns-turkey-with-stuffing/444711017/ He uses a food-safe cotton bag, ...


6

As roux said, and you alluded to, you want a piping bag of some kind. Where I find a piping bag doesn't always work the best, I've been able to steal the concept and slightly modify it by "making my own at home". Put all the filling into a large ziploc bag (I use gallon sized cause I make manicotti in bulk, but quart sized works just as well). Edit: as ...


6

I can think of a couple options I would consider. Pre-cook the stuffing in a casserole dish the night before, then heat it in the oven towards the end of the bird's cooking time. Covered, you could probably leave it in the entire time the bird is cooking, but I don't think it would be necessary to reheat for that long. Cook the stuffing most of the way in ...


5

Chris I think you're going to struggle to make two distinctive dishes whilst essentially using the same ingredients for both of them - therein lies your problem. Do you have to use cranberries and chestnuts in both? There's many different types of vegetarian stuffings you might use that would compliment your nut roast rather than almost copy it. How ...


3

I think you are over thinking this... One one hand, the size of the cavity in the chicken is approximately proportional to the width or height of the chicken, and the width is approximately proportional to the cube root of the weight. However, for small values, the because of the cube law, the volume of the cavity is not going to change by huge amounts--a ...


3

I use dehydrated onion soup mixture as a substitute to many preparations calling for onions. I have never stuffed chicken with it, but I would do it without any doubt. The trick is to get to the appropriate moisture and salt point. I use both water and some other sweet liquid (7up, sprite, coke...) to rehydrate and reduce the slight salty taste of the ...


3

You can use lasagna noodles too and just spread the filling and roll them up. I've done that and gave up trying to stuff manicotti noodles.


2

I cut a soft drink bottle in half, fill with the mixture, and use it to funnel the mixture into a sleeping cannelloni forcing the mixture with gloved hands.


2

There are shells available that can be stuffed before cooking, then are baked in the sauce. Your mileage may vary. Haven't tried it myself.


2

As both roux and stephenmcdonald mentioned, a piping bag is the way to go, as you assumed, but you often need to fill from each side, rather than just one side. (it depends on your filling ... also, it'll give you a prettier canneloni) ... but for manicotti, many places don't use tubes. They use crepes, so you don't have the trouble filling them. I've ...


2

IMO you should only use herbs some onion and fresh fruit as others have stated. Anything that is bread based must heat to 160 to be safe to eat after the fact which means by that time your chicken will be likely 170 and dry. If you insist on a proper stuffing then pull your chicken at 160 then remove the stuffing and put it back in the oven till it's 160


2

I can't find any resources on what to do when you have food with too much pectin in it, but you could combine the goose berries with something which has a low amount of pectin, check out group II or III in this pdf. Don't puree your other ingredient totally and you'll get a thicker filling, as well.


2

The stuffing doesn't add much flavor to the chicken, so no. If I even bother making stuffing, I like to cook the it in a separate pan. I usually have better luck getting the stuffing to a safe temperature without overcooking the meat, and it doesn't get as greasy. It also lets me get plenty of crispy brown bits on the top of the stuffing, which you really ...


1

The problem with your premise is that 165f must be reached for the stuffing to be pasteurized. However, pasteurization begins at the top end of the "danger zone." The USDA spec sets that bar at 140f (in reality, you are out of the danger zone at 127f, but we'll use the USDA spec for the purposes of this discussion). There is a time component to ...


1

I'd cook the stuffing separately; much easier to get both to the ideal temperature that way. You do not want to serve overcooked chicken, and you must not serve undercooked chicken or undercooked stuffing exposed to raw chicken. I'd suggest brining your chicken (in a brine containing herbs, garlic, onion). Keep in mind that most of the herb flavor will stay ...


1

This is an odd kind of answer to the question that you're not exactly asking; If you're interested in stuffing the bird, and consuming the stuffing, but not interested in the yuck of unstuffing the thing, you could fill an improvised food-grade net (i.e. cheesecloth, muslin wort/hop bag, grain sock, etc) that would be permeable AND allow for you to remove ...


1

Very good advice, must try. Regarding soggy/wet pasta, I use the same procedure for both mani's and lasagna-Cook the noodles just enough so that they are pliable, but not fully cooked (you can cut the lasagna noodles with a knife, but they are stiff enough to build). I don't bring my pasta water to a boil, I just heat it enough so that the pasta will cook ...



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