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7

The vast majority of wasabi in the US is mostly horseradish. Some brands like this one, contain no wasabi at all. That one is the #1 seller on Amazon. Other brands, including this one contain a small amount of wasabi, presumably just so they can put wasabi on the list of ingredients. Incidentally, that brand is made in Japan. Real wasabi can be found ...


7

Yeah, how about biscuit dough? That's a common way to do a quick and easy chicken pot pie. It might be a little tricky to actually enclose the curry in the biscuit dough, but it should be doable. For reference, here are a couple of "pot pie" recipes that use biscuit dough on top of the filling: Add a Pinch (from scratch) Bisquick (Using Bisquick brand) ...


6

Sort of. Nut flours are the base of many "flourless" cakes and torts. This one from Joy of Baking is typical, and uses almond flour, which is more common than walnut. Here's one that specifically uses walnut. Note that these are not examples of using nut flours as a substitution for flour, they are recipes developed for nut flours. Both of those recipes ...


6

Many filled doughs don't require long resting times (maybe 30min to an hour), but they generally do require a little bit if kneading to make sure they're sturdy enough to hold a filling. If you have a stand mixer or a food processor, you likely won't need to do any hand-kneading. I'd recommend looking at recipes for either empenadas or samosas. (Look for ...


6

Hello Cheryl and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Ground veal would be an excellent choice to substitute for ground pork. I think you will find that the flavor will be closer than turkey or chicken.


5

If you want something storebought, just get pumpkin puree - it is squash puree, not really even a substitute. Pumpkins are squash, and "pumpkin" is a pretty broad term, covering a lot of winter squash. In fact canned pumpkin is often made with things more similar to butternut squash than what you'd think of as pumpkin (jack-o'-lanterns and all). Just make ...


5

Apparently marigold is quite common in Georgian cooking. I found the following excerpt on this page : Marigold is the "saffron" of Georgia, and although only a little is used, it does make a difference to the colour and flavour. Now, you might think it might be hard to get the spice marigold in Japan, but you would be wrong! I know of at least 3 sources ...


5

Based on you mentioning curry and bread, have you thought about either chapatti or roti? Asides from them being Indian bread and so complementing your curry completely, they are quick and easy to make a little kneading but will take less time than making pastry or biscuit dough. Just make the dough, roll out into a few rounds, fill one half, then fold the ...


4

A direct substitution would not work. The cake needs gluten to rise properly. You could replace up to 1/4 the weight of the wheat flour with proper nut flour, though without much fuss. You can't make nut flour by grinding nuts in a blender/food processor. Nut flour is made from the solid material left over after the oil has been pressed from the nuts. ...


3

Ground lamb may also be a good substitute. It has a bit more fat than veal does, which would come closer to pork (though it may change the flavor a bit, adjust seasoning as needed). Alternatively, a fattier type of ground beef should work good (like ground beef chuck which is around 80% lean habitually). This will have less impact on the flavor than ground ...


2

This recipe! found here , calls for buttermilk or sour cream. Perhaps you can find sour cream. Crème fraîche 1 cup heavy or whipping cream, room temperature 1 tablespoon buttermilk or 1/2 cup sour cream, room temperature In a jar with a lid, place whipping cream and buttermilk (or sour cream); cover securely and shake 15 seconds. Set aside at room ...


2

This seems like a great use of frozen pie crust, the ones that come in a sheet not pre-formed in a tin. This would certainly reduce the time and effort on your side.


2

If you don't want any yolk in your ice cream or Gelato, then you can use agar-agar powder, which is sold in Asian markets. It is made from seaweed, and 100% vegan (It's usual to add gelatin in ice cream for a better texture, but this makes it unsuitable for vegetarians).


2

Lime juice, tamarind paste, vinegars, mango powder, sour yogarts are what I use with a little as possible of table salt.


2

Galangal root is a possibility (more info). It's sort of like ginger that's been kicked up a notch on the hot/spicy axis. Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai stores will have it. There's also a powdered form available online. I've never tried that, but maybe it doesn't suffer the same terrible fate as powdered ginger. Prickly ash (Sichuan pepper) and Japanese ...


2

First off, try digestive biscuits. They're really very similar cookies/crackers/biscuits, and it's a common enough substitution that it's even mentioned on Wikipedia. Cook's Thesaurus implies that they're called wheatmeal biscuits in Australia. sourd'oh's suggestion of particularly crunchy gingersnaps might work too, but you'll also want to make sure ...


1

We were quite relieved that the wasabi we could buy in the U.K. (but Made In Japan) looks and tastes just like the tube we had previously bought in Japan. It is just labelled "wasabi" and, as already stated, only contains a little "real" wasabi. I think what may be going on is that in Japanese you have 本わさび (hon-wasabi, which is the Japanese wasabi plant) ...


1

I quite often use a bottom heated gas oven at work for my slow cooked pork joints as we can't afford to have our main ovens on such a low heat all day. Never once have we had an issue getting crispy skin. Using a blow torch you will probably find the skin blackens on top and the underside still being chewy-er than out of date beef jerky... If you're meat ...


1

I agree with Athanasius, it's best to follow a reputable recipe and not mess with substitutions when curing meats. You're playing with fire. The very fact that you would ask in that way tells me you don't have the background to even be thinking about it, since there is more than one type of curing salt. From Wiki Curing salts are used in food ...


1

I have had luck befriending employees at local pizza joints, and asking if they will order a bucket for me with their next supply shipment (it pays to tip well). Many of the companies that pizza shops order from carry ricotta impastata. It's usually no more than $10 - $20 for a 5lb bucket, and it's perfect for cannoli.


1

No, ghee cannot be used in place of butter, because ghee is clarified. This removes the water from the butter, which is a key component of butter when used in baking. The water evaporating and creating steam pockets gives a lot of foods their fluffy texture. The removal of the water would create a lot of issues in getting your desserts to come out right, ...


1

I use extra virgin olive oil in cakes all the time because thats usually all I have on hand it it works just fine. Never tasted a difference and never had anyone else taste a difference.



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