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7

The closest thing you are likely to find is a product called Wondra flour. Like idealmjöl, it is a pre-gelated wheat flour, but unlike idealmjöl it also includes some malted barley flour. One post on this forum implies they may be interchangeable.


7

AFAIK, (which isn't much) there is no one good substitute for eggs in baking. This is because the egg can be there for one or more of several reasons. This includes as a flavorant, emulsifier, moisturizer and leavener. So, I'll address each of these separately. Flavor - I have yet to find an ingredient or ester I can easily produce to replicate the very ...


6

In general, shallots, leeks, or chives would be milder than regular onions and probably a closer approximation to green onions, though all are usually harder to find than green onions. Leeks and chives have the advantage that they also have a similar color to green onions. The sharpness of all of these substitutes (onions included) can be tamed by cooking, ...


4

Dextrose is one of the two stereoisomers of glucose, also known as D-glucose. The other is L-glucose. The two isomers are exactly the same except for being mirror images of one another. In cooking, all glucose you encounter is going to be dextrose as that's the form that terrestrial life is able to produce and metabolize. (A few unusual bacteria can ...


4

The whiskey is there to add flavor. If it were in the praline centers it might have some texture effect too, but in the batter, especially in this small an amount, it's really only going to matter for flavor. You should be able to substitute water, plus an appropriate amount of some kind of flavored extract you do want - vanilla, rum, or anything that ...


4

Absolutely no difference. The small volume that the nuts take up is not enough to change the consistency of the product. Around here they sell extra-crunchy.


3

Nope. For peanut butter cookies it's just a matter of taste, and it's 1:1.


3

Onion would work, but it has a much sharper flavour, so you should use maybe just a quarter as much of it, depending on how much you like the taste of onion. The flavour will be slightly different than if you used green onions, but it should still be delicious.


3

My step daughter also has celiacs/coeliacs disease. We often use all-purpose gluten free flour for soups, cheese sauce and roux etc. I can honestly say there is no noticeable difference. The only thing I would recommend is if the recipe asks you to make a roux don't try and cook out the flour as it will turn lumpy. Instead just melt the butter, add the flour ...


3

I have a severe Allium allergy (imagine eating poison ivy) and am an avid cook. I have found that the function of the allium in the recipe is crucial in determining the substitution. Alliums can add heat, sweetness, tang, and often also give depth to the flavor of a complex sauce. Celery is always the base from which I start, adding some combination of ...


3

Two years later, the chestnut idea worked swimmingly :D I followed the recipe I linked in the question, with the following changes: Obviously, I replaced one pound of mushrooms with one pound of chestnuts. In hindsight, that was probably a bit too much, as a pound of mushrooms would have cooked down significantly more, but we didn't mind. In step 3, I ...


2

As stated by Logophobe below, you can of course substitute ingredients as you like. I personally find subbing beef for lamb or vice versa a bit risky though. Lamb in general has a much milder taste of itself and thus requires a sauce and other accompanyments that do not overpower the taste of the meat. In your case this could mean that the sauce will be too ...


2

I have a family member who is lactose intolerant, and we often substitute margarine (or various oils) for butter in cooking. We've found that this is mostly interchangeable, but can be unpredictable in baking due to different melting properties. Also, as Marti noted in a comment below, it's a challenge to find unsalted margarine (important if directly ...


2

Yes. There would be a difference in texture. Some jaggery tend to be a bit sticky when heated. Groundnut chikkis is a good example. Also, sugar tastes different than jaggery when cooked. Jaggery has an earthy tang to it. In my honest opinion, if you can get good quality jaggery, prefer it over sugar. Simply because its more natural product than sugar.


2

You could try red onions. They might have a little more flavor, but should be mild enough to taste good.


2

You can use pure starch for that, you don't need a flour. If you are careful with the sprinkling, it will work too. But the easiest way is to dissolve a bit of starch with a bit of water in a teacup, and pour into the sauce. No clumping, and it thickens beautifully. The sauce needs to come to a boil for the starch to work, I don't know if this is needed ...


1

canola oil and vegetable oil are the usually the same thing. Veg oil is simply a less specific oil that could be made from different or combined vegetable sources, but not those which contain nut oils. sunflower (not safflower) oil is likely your best bet for the least flavor contribution to your granola.


1

It is made from canola plants, but works just the same. I regularly substitute Canola oil for vegetable oil in recipes and do not notice the difference. It is healthier, has a similar burn point, and has no odor so it is a good choice.


1

A wild suggestion here --- go on Facebook and ask Marcus Samuelsson. Of anyone in the US that would have the definitive answer, I'd bet on Marcus.


1

Not really, unless you go for a different carbohydrate with physical properties similar to refined sucrose. And if you are removing the sugar for dietary reasons, you're probably not winning anything by doing the substitution. Artificial sweeteners and stevia are just that - a sweetener, not a sugar. They can only be successfully used as a substitute where ...


1

I'm not much of a pastry guy, and I haven't worked with pure glucose before, but it looks like this probably isn't an ideal substitution. Regular table sugar (sucrose) is composed of glucose and fructose, and of the two, fructose is more than twice as sweet. So a simple substitution will leave your end product much less sweet than it should be, and ...


1

Yes, yes you can. If you're adjusting cooking times, seasonings, and other factors, you can make whatever substitution you want to a recipe. Culinary purists might sneer at you but there will be no legal, regulatory, emotional, or philosophical consequences. Just don't mislabel the end product (i.e. call it a "lamb sauce" even though it's made with beef ...


1

You can easily make your own craime fraiche with heavy cream and a couple of tablespoons of live culture buttermilk. Just let it sit in a warm place overnight and it will be ready the next morning.


1

Alex and Aki at "Ideas in Food" have developed a gluten free flour that works as a substitute for wheat flour in almost any situation. I have used it successfully in a roux. http://blog.ideasinfood.com/ideas_in_food/2012/02/what-iif-flour.html


1

Have used sherry instead of madeira in a mushroom risotto which tasted horrible. A better substitute was dry white wine but this does not have the same flavour as when I have used Madeira. The Madeira adds a beautiful depth which the white wine lacked. Hope this helps.


1

A generic bulk product labeled and called only "red pepper" is sold very cheaply in most International Markets, Asian and Chinese grocery stores in US. It is always a very finely ground red powder sold in 500g (and much larger) clear plastic pillow shaped bags that I can never use up. (Normal label just says Brand, "Red Pepper", weight.) I think it can ...


1

I make Biscotti and have had great success in following my own recipe, however when visiting my daughter who uses only raw sugar, when I added it to the beaten eggs and melted butter it changed the whole structure of the cookie. It puffed up like a huge marshmallow, however I continued to add the rest of the ingredients. Upon baking the loaf, it did not ...


1

I'm in the same position (no alcohol at home), but I'm kind of a foodie. I've never found any luck with any of the ingredients listed above (I still need to try the Balsamic Vinegar trick). Not only is the flavor just not the same, most of the time it's just wrong. After searching for many years, I stumbled across Meier's Sparkling Grape Juice. They seem ...



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