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11

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


9

My general advice is just to taste your food as you cook it. Start with a little hot pepper and figure out the "heat level" you like, with whatever peppers you use, and then you can add more to calibrate the recipe. Keep in mind you can always add more spice with more peppers, but it's difficult to lower the "heat level." If you can stand to taste the ...


9

Yes, you can usually make that substitution without a problem. The key thing in substituting peppers is that you like the substitution. So, experimentation is necessary to find what is ideal for you. Personally, I like the flavor (separate from the heat) of habanero peppers more than I like the flavor of jalapenos, but I usually have jalapenos on hand. So I ...


4

Peanut oil is fine to use for vegetable oil. Since both are neutral with a high smoke point, they can be used interchangeably.


4

If you can find a local Asian or Mexican specialty food store, you'll be more likely to find them, though they may be in the frozen section. Part of the uniqueness of these leaves is that they impart a slight flavor to the food cooked in them. People in the tropics use these huge leaves to line cooking pits and to wrap everything from pigs to rice. The ...


3

If you have not already looked, check the vegetarian section of where-ever you get groceries. At least here in the USA there are several varieties of Italian "sausage" that are entirely meat free and kosher. YMMV, but I find them to be an entirely satisfactory substitute.


3

As mentioned in a previous response, Cooks Illustrated did a test some years ago (2003, I think), where they concluded that the preferred vanilla in a taste test was some cheap artificial vanilla from a local drugstore's generic section or something. They have since done further tests (such as this one in 2009), and real vanilla sometimes edges out the ...


2

You could roll it between sheets of plastic wrap or parchment paper, if you have those.


2

Probably won't make too much difference for carnitas. FWIW, when I make them, I cut up an orange or two and cook it with the pork for a while. Then remove before cooking down completely


2

My experience is that adzuki have a very different taste and texture than red beans and I wouldn't substitute one for the other. If you've really gotten into mochi, it will be worth the effort to find adzuki - I've bought them in natural food stores, Whole Foods and on line And I buy in bulk so I never run out. Beans seem to last forever.


1

TL;DR: you will never get the same heat from any quantity of jalepenos as you will from 1 habenaro. Read on for why. So, those two peppers have different flavor profiles. Additionally, habaneros are magnitudes hotter than jalapeƱos. I can handle, but not enjoy eating a habanero because it's really too hot, but I can easily eat whole jalepenos one right ...


1

Bar Akiva, you are very lucky as this is a really easy problem to solve: just don't use sausage in your ragu! Traditional ragus don't have sausage at all. The usual recipes call for minced beef or minced calf meat as a primary ingredient; to it you can add a quantity of minced pork to add more flavour (by adding fat), balancing on your taste between 50% ...


1

Asia invented noodles and everyone has been playing with the recipe for thousands of years. Here in louisiana every region and even every household has a different gumbo recipe... Noodles are kinda the same, all across Asia there are a thousand different recipes with hundreds of different noodle recipes. In short, try it out and see if you like it. Happy ...


1

There seems to be no clear definition for what "gluten free all purpose flour" is. If you look at two popular brand you will find that one of them is using rice flour, the other a legume flour as their main ingredient. These two ingredients behave very very differently - rice flour is a starchy affair that is good at making things crisp, legume flours are ...


1

A version without marshmallows would be those that bind rice krispies (or cornflakes) with chocolate. See for example bbcgoodfoods (using cornflakes) or a site for kids. The base procedure is to melt chocolate, optionally thin it a bit with butter and/or syrup and fold in your cereals. If you want light rice krispie treats, use white chocolate instead of ...


1

There are plenty of recipes for rice krispie cakes without marshmallows in them. Rather than trying to substitute in your recipe, you'd be better off making something slightly different but that's been tested. Here's an example from tesco. The recipe we use is based on golden syrup, but isn't online. A search for "rice Krispie cake -marshmallow", possibly ...


1

Sugar water will just make your Krispies soggy. Anything but gelatin and marshmallows will make them taste funny, but sufficient peanut (or other nut) butter, to make the stuff stick together, plus an egg might give you something tasty and edible after baking.


1

As an Australian we seem to use Arnott's Milk Arrowroot or Arnott's Milk Coffee biscuits in a lot of recipes. Milk Arrowroot


1

There's not really any difference between the two apart from the colour. Sometimes ghee contains a few extra flavourings to make the taste more distinctive. However, I don't think there's much of a difference.


1

As you're making a dessert, you could use confectioner's sugar, but you might want to reduce the sugar in the filling slightly. Superfine sugar can also work, but you'll end up adding more sugar to the crust in the process. Another alternative is to grate the crust using the largest set of holes on your box grater (you may need to re-freeze it for this), ...


1

Cornstarch or fine cornmeal would work fine. You could use bisquick or something similar in a pinch, though that may have consequences. All you're really doing is trying to keep it from sticking as you roll it out.


1

Also try sieving or blending the cottage cheese first, if you don't like the texture but don't mind its subtle flavour. It changes the texture totally, and my husband will happily eat it in pasta dishes, even though he doesn't like the texture usually.


1

Just boil some eggs take out the yokes and drop them in the gumbo just before it's finished. Instant heart healthy shrimp.



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