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2

Your first option are thickeners. I won't be counting them all off my fingers, see http://blog.khymos.org/recipe-collection/ and choose the ones which fit your dietary restrictions. For example, gelatine will work, and so will starch. You'd need to cook your smoothie and let it cool for the starch, but you could alternatively prepare a thickish starch ...


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My favorite smoothie thickener is chia seed. A tablespoon will thicken a blender of smoothie into pudding. According to the internet it is also a low FODMAP food. It is a small, black seed which will change the texture a bit. With raspberry or strawberry or vanilla they are lost among the other seeds. It has the added benefit of being neutrally flavored ...


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I have a feeling Glucomanan (konjac root) would work well for you. It's fairly easy to source online and in some stores, and is super simple to use in smoothies. You add 1/4-1/2 tsp of the powder per cup or so of liquid and blend in high until it starts to make a glug-glug sound and leave to rest for a minute. At this point you can drink it, or blend again ...


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What happens if you simply adjust the solid: liquid ratio? I.E use a bit less milk? I would also perhaps suggest using more banana.


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Yes, if you consider some kosher sausage to be a sausage, and therefore a substitute for a non-kosher sausage. No, if you want a sausage which is "like" blood sausage. It's pretty much like itself, and not much else, other than "it's a sausage", in which case, see above.


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The difficulty in answering this question is that the texture and taste of "normal" cured bacon can vary so much depending on processing. At least for the U.S., my guess is that many people who have bought stuff labeled "uncured bacon" are actually experiencing the differences of processing techniques, rather than any major difference related to "cured" vs. ...


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I find the texture of uncured bacon to be much firmer than cured when it is cooked the same way. The meaty portion seems to be a bit tougher in uncured bacon. Even though it may be not quite so healthy to eat cured bacon, the texture and taste are more to my liking. Since I only eat bacon once in a while, I am opting for the cured version. This is ...


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I had no coconut milk, so instead I used 1% low fat milk and honey, and I have to say the result was a surprisingly great tasting curry. Here's the rest of the ingredients I used: 1 can of garbanzo beans Veggie oil and coconut oil 1 onion 1 garlic clove Approx. 1 tsp of coriander About 2 tsp of curry powder A dash of garlic salt. 2 fresh green spicy ...


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There are quite a few vegan Worcestershire sauces on the market already. I've used both Annie's and The Wizard's lately, and both are adequate (I think I prefer the latter; it has a more traditional flavor).


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One of the best substitutes I've found is Mushroom Catsup. Don't be fooled by the name, it is a thin, brown sauce with plenty of savory flavor, not really similar to the thick tomato stuff we are familiar with. Given the relative historical timing, it may be that Worcestershire sauce was a substitute for mushroom catsup in traditional cooking. I've tried ...


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I usually use cashews and nutritional yeast to make a vegan cheese sauce. You could also add some miso paste for extra "cheese" flavor. Just blend it with some unsweetened almond milk in a food processor until it's creamy. It's so easy to make! :-) Or you could also buy vegan cheese at the store. My favorite is Daiya I made a vegetarian breakfast casserole ...



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