Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Peanut (groundnut) oil is a great option. In the US vegetable oil generally means soybean oil or a soybean oil blend. The main things are that it be neutral (little or no taste of its own), with a high smoke point. On those scores, you can't do much better than peanut oil. I have not used rice bran oil. Yellow squash generally means this: (the long ...


7

In Canada "Vegetable Oil" is generally taken as 100% unblended canola/rapeseed oil Refined canola oil has a smoke point of 400F, according to: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/collectedinfo/oilsmokepoints.htm You can choose from that chart any of the oils that fit your temperature range, and provide the degree of flavouring you desire.


6

From a purist perspective, cabbage is fairly important to the recognizability of the dish by that name (as well as the pickled matchstick-cut ginger). Additional ingredients beyond those two are far more substitutable (at least from common Japanese perspective); the cabbage actually contributes a fair amount of flavor to an otherwise unremarkable dish. In ...


6

I looked to the wiki I've been maintaining on translating between English dialects, but I realized that the 'yellow squash' distinction was a bit muddled in there: Summer Squash (US) are members of the squash family with a short storage life typically harvested before full maturity; typically available starting in the spring and summer; includes zucchini, ...


5

In Britain the two most common vegetable oils are Sunflower oil and Rapeseed Oil. Sunflower oil has a smoke point of over 400F, and Rapeseed oil similar, assuming both are refined which is almost always the case as sold in supermarkets. Rapeseed is reported to have higher omega-3s than Sunflower oil so is increasingly popular, but Sunflower oil is very ...


4

No, there is no such substitute, sorry. The flavor of parmesan is dominated by both the tyrosine and the MSG it contains. If these two are triggering migraine, then there is no alternative which will be even close to the original in taste. Everything one can suggest as a substitute (marmite, certain fungi) is high in MSG. You can of course use ...


3

I've never seen ground rabbit, but I've eaten rabbit many times in Spain grilled in the BBQ or in a Paella. Rabbit can compare to chicken. The meat is a bit tougher than chicken but not gamey at all. At least the farm rabbits I ate. So I would say that yes, you should be able to use this ground meat as a substitute of chicken in a sauce and I don't even ...


3

Cindy is right, you can just make a bigger batch (particularly if you're planning to use this recipe multiple times) and measure directly out of your pre-mixed batch. But, if you don't want to do that, you'll want to do some math. First off, 1 tbsp = 3 tsp, so to simplify your 2 tbsp and 3/4 tsp, you've actually got 6-3/4 tsp of pepper. Now, you're ...


2

Lemons and Limes will freeze (i would advise bagged with little air - seems the zest can get freezer burned...), and can be zested frozen (eg with a nutmeg grater, or said microplane). .... If no such tool is available: A vegetable peeler can get the zest off in strips, it depends on the exact peeler whether there will be too much pith attached (can be ...


2

I am an Aussie. We use Marie biscuits.


2

It is true that you can use the cottage cheese, you could even use ricotta cheese which Italians have a Ricotta Cheese Pie and Sambucca Liqueur is used as a flavoring. It is delicious. Using cottage cheese, which I have, really does not taste good, not only in my opinion but others who have tried to cut calories. Either use less cream cheese with less ...


2

No soy and no ginger is a challenge, it can be done though if you pick the right recipes. Galangal has a similar flavor as ginger and may work, it's in the same family as ginger but is a different sub-family, so it may be different enough not to cause a reaction. Cardamom and turmeric are in the same family as well, if you don't have a reaction to them ...


2

The "key property" of the papaya and the reason why it is used is its texture: crunchyness. I think you can use anything else that is crunchy and has a quite neutral taste, like cucumber peel, cabbage, kohlrabi, carrots, young lotus stalks (like the ones in this receipe, not these), or unripe mango. I had them in salads similar to the green papaya salad and ...


1

It seems there are a few options for you. This recipe recommends: But, if you don't [have] a green papaya, try substituting shredded cucumber, carrot and daikon radish. Another recipe notes the possibility of using: You will probably have to go to Chinatown to find green (unripe) papaya. Alternatively, substitute a crisp vegetable such as jicama ...


1

I am not familiar with your specific recipe, but I usually use yeast in bread or pizza dough. You can use dried and fresh yeast, either works for me. You need to let it rise for an hour or so when you prepared the dough. You could put it all mixed together in a bowl and put that in warm water. That will speed up the rising process.


1

I see no reason not to flip between those choices willy-nilly. They are all fairly neutral, largely unsaturated, relatively high-smoke-point oils. That makes them pretty much interchangeable, and good for shallow frying, deep frying, baking (when unsaturated is desired), and uncooked applications. I generally keep one bottle of oil that fits that ...


1

Ratios of saturated/monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats, and ratios of which kind of polyunsaturated (omega-3/6/7/9) are different for each oil. While the ratio of polyunsaturated fats to each other will mostly be a health matter and out of scope here, the saturated/mono/poly ratio has an influence on consistency at a given temperature (eg the coconut oil ...


1

You could use Brussels sprouts- basically mini cabbages. Or just buy the cabbage and start a freezer bag of veggie waste to make your own vegetable stock for soups. Lots of information can be found online about doing this if vegetable waste is a concern for you. Homemade stocks are much tastier and you know exactly what's going into them. Another ...


1

Here's what I've been able to find (looking at crushed red pepper flake substitutions): This site says to 2/3s as much ground as crushed: Substitute 1⁄2 tsp (2 mL) ground cayenne pepper with: • 3⁄4 tsp (4 mL) crushed red pepper flakes I'm not sure why the mL are doubled but the tsp are 2/3s This site says 2/3s as well: 1/2 tsp Cayenne ...


1

To get an exacting amount as per your substitution of 4 parts paprika to 1 part cayenne you need to mix the proper amounts of each together first. E.g., mix 4 Tbs of paprika and 1 Tbs of cayenne together. Then you would use the amount of the mixture you need, in your case, 2 Tbs + 3/4 tsp. You can still add more of the mixture if you want, as per your ...


1

Perhaps try coconut milk? Makes for a fairly stable dairy-free ganache that holds at room temperature!! Just make sure you don't break your chocolate with too much heat :) I usually go with a double boiler.


1

Chicken Ramen packets work great, just add a little bit of cumin and garlic in some form.


1

I'll attempt to clarify a few issues that have come up in previous answers and comments: I can think of three primary functions for buttermilk in most recipes: flavor a texture agent (to get a certain thickness or viscosity) leavening (when combined with other chemical agents) The best substitute will depend on which of these factors is/are necessary ...


1

I make a pretty good creamy sauce which is just cooking butter beans with garlic, onion, salt and pepper in vegetable stock - blend that until you get a good sauce consistency - add some turmeric and adjust the seasoning to taste. This is good for people who cant have soy/nut milks. Doesn't necessarily have the exact same taste as cheese sauce, but has a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible