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0

Yes, you can use them the same way you would use the leaves- note that flowers are often used in herbal tea blends (I see hibiscus used particularly often). Depending on the cultivar, however, the flavor may be noticeably different than what you would get with the leaves, probably a bit more bitter- that's what I noticed when using mint flowers for tea, and ...


2

No soy and no ginger is a challenge, it can be done though if you pick the right recipes. Galangal has a similar flavor as ginger and may work, it's in the same family as ginger but is a different sub-family, so it may be different enough not to cause a reaction. Cardamom and turmeric are in the same family as well, if you don't have a reaction to them ...


0

I have occasionally used mace as a substitute for ginger. I'm not sure how it would work in Asian food though.


1

I am not familiar with your specific recipe, but I usually use yeast in bread or pizza dough. You can use dried and fresh yeast, either works for me. You need to let it rise for an hour or so when you prepared the dough. You could put it all mixed together in a bowl and put that in warm water. That will speed up the rising process.


0

Of course you can BUT, your final product will suffer greatly. I'm a professional Pastry Chef and wouldn't consider doing it for any reason.


2

It is true that you can use the cottage cheese, you could even use ricotta cheese which Italians have a Ricotta Cheese Pie and Sambucca Liqueur is used as a flavoring. It is delicious. Using cottage cheese, which I have, really does not taste good, not only in my opinion but others who have tried to cut calories. Either use less cream cheese with less ...


0

You can, yes and you use the same amount as you would cream cheese. Refs: http://ni.lovefoodhatewaste.com/node/1414 http://dish.allrecipes.com/common-ingredient-substitutions/


-2

I do, it works marvellously for me.


0

The water content in butter/margarine can be enough to make things rise from steam action that you do not want risen (shortbread type doughs which you want to keep shape), or make things wet which you want to stay dry (molten chocolate)... and some textures might rely on the fat not melting below a certain temperature, or quickly going from solid to thin ...


1

I see no reason not to flip between those choices willy-nilly. They are all fairly neutral, largely unsaturated, relatively high-smoke-point oils. That makes them pretty much interchangeable, and good for shallow frying, deep frying, baking (when unsaturated is desired), and uncooked applications. I generally keep one bottle of oil that fits that ...


1

Ratios of saturated/monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats, and ratios of which kind of polyunsaturated (omega-3/6/7/9) are different for each oil. While the ratio of polyunsaturated fats to each other will mostly be a health matter and out of scope here, the saturated/mono/poly ratio has an influence on consistency at a given temperature (eg the coconut oil ...


-1

How about putting them in a freezer bag full of water ,then put them in the freezer.Works well for freezing fish.


4

No, there is no such substitute, sorry. The flavor of parmesan is dominated by both the tyrosine and the MSG it contains. If these two are triggering migraine, then there is no alternative which will be even close to the original in taste. Everything one can suggest as a substitute (marmite, certain fungi) is high in MSG. You can of course use ...


5

In Britain the two most common vegetable oils are Sunflower oil and Rapeseed Oil. Sunflower oil has a smoke point of over 400F, and Rapeseed oil similar, assuming both are refined which is almost always the case as sold in supermarkets. Rapeseed is reported to have higher omega-3s than Sunflower oil so is increasingly popular, but Sunflower oil is very ...


7

In Canada "Vegetable Oil" is generally taken as 100% unblended canola/rapeseed oil Refined canola oil has a smoke point of 400F, according to: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/collectedinfo/oilsmokepoints.htm You can choose from that chart any of the oils that fit your temperature range, and provide the degree of flavouring you desire.


0

"Vegetable oil", in the US, generally means canola oil (aka rapeseed oil). (In many cases, of course, you could substitute another neutral oil with a similar smoke point, if canola isn't available.)


6

I looked to the wiki I've been maintaining on translating between English dialects, but I realized that the 'yellow squash' distinction was a bit muddled in there: Summer Squash (US) are members of the squash family with a short storage life typically harvested before full maturity; typically available starting in the spring and summer; includes zucchini, ...


12

Peanut (groundnut) oil is a great option. In the US vegetable oil generally means soybean oil or a soybean oil blend. The main things are that it be neutral (little or no taste of its own), with a high smoke point. On those scores, you can't do much better than peanut oil. I have not used rice bran oil. Yellow squash generally means this: (the long ...


0

The only thing that even closely resembles mustard that I can think of would be Horseradish and real wasabi.


0

It's the gelatin. If it were the cream, the top layer would be fatty. As in the first answer, you need to 'bloom' the gelatin properly


3

I've never seen ground rabbit, but I've eaten rabbit many times in Spain grilled in the BBQ or in a Paella. Rabbit can compare to chicken. The meat is a bit tougher than chicken but not gamey at all. At least the farm rabbits I ate. So I would say that yes, you should be able to use this ground meat as a substitute of chicken in a sauce and I don't even ...


0

I'm at a bit of a loss providing advice on this issue because I've never heard of it (short of burning the ingredients in the dish). There's a very, very slight bitterness in proper ramen-style noodles because of the alkali content of kansui (potassium carbonate and sodium carbonate or bicarbonate in water solution), but in typical noodles of reasonable ...


2

I am an Aussie. We use Marie biscuits.


0

I've just made great pancakes using ground flax seed instead of eggs. I just put 1 spoonful in the batter, let it rest a couple of minutes, and it was ready to fry. Great substitute


2

Lemons and Limes will freeze (i would advise bagged with little air - seems the zest can get freezer burned...), and can be zested frozen (eg with a nutmeg grater, or said microplane). .... If no such tool is available: A vegetable peeler can get the zest off in strips, it depends on the exact peeler whether there will be too much pith attached (can be ...


0

Tahini is known to be useful for a sharp/tangy element... incorporating smoky flavors into the sauce (smoked salt/liquid smoke/smoked paprika...) also seems to kind of help the illusion...


0

For 'chicken' strips I often use tofu that has been pressed for a really long time so it has less of a squishy texture, then roll it in flour paprika and salt and flash fry it until it's golden brown and crispy on the outside.


1

I make a pretty good creamy sauce which is just cooking butter beans with garlic, onion, salt and pepper in vegetable stock - blend that until you get a good sauce consistency - add some turmeric and adjust the seasoning to taste. This is good for people who cant have soy/nut milks. Doesn't necessarily have the exact same taste as cheese sauce, but has a ...


1

Perhaps try coconut milk? Makes for a fairly stable dairy-free ganache that holds at room temperature!! Just make sure you don't break your chocolate with too much heat :) I usually go with a double boiler.


-1

I came here because I don't actually like the white cake. The texture is a bit different. After reading these great suggestions I found instructions on the box in small print. Betty Crocker mix says: add the whole egg and don't change anything else. I think I will do that. Thanks for all the suggestions..


-1

The difference is in the size, powder=fine, crushed or coarse ground=medium, whole=large, period, the rest can be dictated by taste and personal preference. Unless you're baking recipes are less formula and more subjective. A fine power will be denser (you can pack more small particles into a space than med or lg) and the flavor generally more intense. The ...


1

You could use Brussels sprouts- basically mini cabbages. Or just buy the cabbage and start a freezer bag of veggie waste to make your own vegetable stock for soups. Lots of information can be found online about doing this if vegetable waste is a concern for you. Homemade stocks are much tastier and you know exactly what's going into them. Another ...


6

From a purist perspective, cabbage is fairly important to the recognizability of the dish by that name (as well as the pickled matchstick-cut ginger). Additional ingredients beyond those two are far more substitutable (at least from common Japanese perspective); the cabbage actually contributes a fair amount of flavor to an otherwise unremarkable dish. In ...


1

I'll attempt to clarify a few issues that have come up in previous answers and comments: I can think of three primary functions for buttermilk in most recipes: flavor a texture agent (to get a certain thickness or viscosity) leavening (when combined with other chemical agents) The best substitute will depend on which of these factors is/are necessary ...


1

Here's what I've been able to find (looking at crushed red pepper flake substitutions): This site says to 2/3s as much ground as crushed: Substitute 1⁄2 tsp (2 mL) ground cayenne pepper with: • 3⁄4 tsp (4 mL) crushed red pepper flakes I'm not sure why the mL are doubled but the tsp are 2/3s This site says 2/3s as well: 1/2 tsp Cayenne ...


3

Cindy is right, you can just make a bigger batch (particularly if you're planning to use this recipe multiple times) and measure directly out of your pre-mixed batch. But, if you don't want to do that, you'll want to do some math. First off, 1 tbsp = 3 tsp, so to simplify your 2 tbsp and 3/4 tsp, you've actually got 6-3/4 tsp of pepper. Now, you're ...


1

To get an exacting amount as per your substitution of 4 parts paprika to 1 part cayenne you need to mix the proper amounts of each together first. E.g., mix 4 Tbs of paprika and 1 Tbs of cayenne together. Then you would use the amount of the mixture you need, in your case, 2 Tbs + 3/4 tsp. You can still add more of the mixture if you want, as per your ...


0

There are so many recipes for making a dal and the type of onions do not matter. You can use any kind of onions and in fact you can prepare dal without onions too.



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