New answers tagged

-1

In reply to your question - "So what's the thought process behind the development and release of this product?" Answer - to trick you into buying their fake product by implying that it is vegan and doesn't contain dairy. I have noticed more and more fake vegan products coming into the supermarkets that all have some kind of animal by-product in it. Even ...


4

It's cheaper to produce than actual cheese. In fact, some years ago, technology in Eastern Europe caught up with the world but legislation didn't - and suddenly there was a scandal when people realized that what they are being sold as "cheese" is in fact something else. Even after the change in legislation (which required labelling of non-cheese alternatives ...


0

Some people are intolerent to the fermentation process used to make the cheese (intolerent to some sort of bacteries I gess) Some other people just don't like the taste of cheese, but like the other dairy products (e.g. yoghurts, cream) In both case, these cheese alternative are fine for them, and they can use it to cook meals that normally use cheese they ...


26

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


1

Every substitution is probably going to require other alterations. Baking soda's effects extend beyond leavening: it generally reacts with acidic ingredients (making the batter less sour) and also provides sodium ions which can affect flavor. If the substitute doesn't react with acid as strongly, you may need to decrease acid ingredients or substitute ...


-1

To replace baking soda, you can use four times the soda's measurement of baking powder. There are other alternatives, such as Natron if you live in Europe or have access to a European marketplace, but they tend to get complicated as acidic ingredients become involved. New Health Guide has a specific page here dedicated to this question. with not only ...


3

I think it's worth the money, but buy in bulk like from Costco or Wholesale. You can get a big block for about 20 bucks and it lasts a long time in the fridge. Parmesan is rich in glutamates, the stuff that gives us the umami or meaty savoury taste. That's why we like it so much. If you want to replace it, try replacing it with another cheese that was ...


1

oh goodness, never considered parmesan that way - but maybe another sharp Italian cheddar would be more to your liking? Try pecorino romano, or a sharp matured asiago or maybe an aged provolone if you can find a sharp one? I tend to think if you got a better quality parmesan like Reggiano or Padano you may like it? it can be expensive though.


1

Citrus juice is probably the most widely available substitute. However, if you can get your hands on some Verjus (or Verjuice) you will be pleasantly surprised. Verjus is the juice of pressed green grapes. It is similar to wine but the grapes haven't had a chance to ripen and there isn't any alcohol. It has a much more neutral flavor than lemon juice. ...


0

Unfortunately there really isn't anything that tastes like vinegar except for vinegar, and the lemon juice you're trying is about as close as you're going to get. It just comes down to chemistry. Most categories of edible compounds, like starch, protein, hydrocarbon lipids, etc. have a ton of different compounds in them, so if you have to avoid one you can ...


1

Anaheims would be OK, but their flavor isn't just milder with respect to heat, but just generally weaker. Pasilla would be closest in flavor. Ancho is usually pretty easy to find and is fairly similar, just not as hot. Chile de Arbol would be a good substitute, as would plain old cayenne if you can find dried cayenne peppers. Heck, red pepper flakes ...


1

Tequila substitute – In a Southwestern type of a marinade, Cactus juice or nectar. If I’m making a recipe that calls for a small bit of tequila, I sometimes use a squirt or two of lime, instead. If the recipe already has lime, I’ll just leave the tequila out. In a marinade I might add a dash of white vinegar.


1

We keep both in the house, and i always seen to find myself in the middle of prep and not being able to find the one I'm looking for. As a consequence, I have subbed katakuriko for corn starch and vice-versa in equal amounts on several occasions, and never had trouble with the results having the wrong texture or tasting strange. That being said, I have ...


1

You can try grinding some cashews with a tiny pinch of brown sugar and even smaller pinch of vanilla bean seeds, then roasting them a few minutes in a hot oven, but you'd probably have to make 10 attempts at that to come close to the subtle sweet / nutty taste of almonds. And, cashews are oily. But if you don't like almonds, making other stuff taste more ...


6

I suggest looking for a recipe without almonds rather than substituting a major ingredient. If you can't find one without almonds, you may have to track down a similar cake recipe under a different name. I'm sure it would be possible to find another ground nut that would work, but it would take some experimenting because the texture and water/fat content ...


1

You can use applesause it works better if you ask me I can't have oil so I use applesauce use the same as the recipe calls for


-1

Homogenized means homogenized. All milk has been homogenized for 50 years. It's so common you don't hear the term anymore. It's a process of breaking down the fat particles so they stay in suspension. In other words you don't want the product to separate. Shortening would separate if not homogenized. All shortenings, as we know them, are homogenized. I ...


3

Any fat can always replace any other fat, so if you have any of the following around, they can be used as a substitute: Butter Duck fat Olive oil (yes, it's a vegetable oil, which you say you don't have, but you might not have thought of this one) ... Note however, that using different fats will change the texture and taste of the final product. (if ...


1

I was making a vegetable curry and my coconut milk had gone bad, so I came to this sight for a substitute. I didn't have any of the items suggested in the other responses. Then the answer came to me: Silken Tofu. Blend in a food processor with veggie broth, red curry paste, some Masala seasoning, and salt. I poured it over a combo of cauliflower, butternut ...


0

Go to the Filipino groceries. They stock Graham biscuits. I've just bought some at Manila Mart in Ryde (Sydney) and have also seen them at Ashfield Mall in Sydney where the fruit and veg shop is run by Filipinos.


5

When something calls for cardamom pods, you get a lot more flavor if you put the entire pod in, and split open to expose the seeds. You also get a lot more flavor if you happen to pick the pod up in a bite, and it's .. quite strong. Some people like it, I certainly don't mind it, but my kids would rather not have them as a surprise. I tend to remove them. I ...


5

Lemon is used as a flavoring, not as a cooking liquid, it's not going to keep the fish moist. The secret of having moist fish is the same as having moist beef, chicken or any meat or poultry: don't overcook it. Cooking releases moisture from the flesh, so cooking it well is all about timing - getting it cooked enough to have the internal temperature and ...


0

There's certainly no requirement to use lemons if you don't care for them or simply don't have any. Here's a batch of cod that I just baked tonight: Placed on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, drizzled with some olive oil and seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic powder and Old Bay seasoning — but use what ever appeals to you. Bake in a moderate ...


0

You could bake it in an orange sauce with orange juice, thyme and orange zest 1⁄2 cup fresh orange juice 1⁄2 tablespoon dried thyme or 1 teaspoon fresh thyme chopped 1⁄2 tablespoon orange zest


3

Do you want rye bread, or do you want "the taste you may associate with rye bread?" (caraway seeds) If you want bread that tastes like seeded rye, caraway seeds will get you 99.5% of the way there - they are rather overpowering and appear to be what most people "mean" when they say "rye bread" in my experience. They can be put in wheat bread without most ...


0

No. Sodium bicarbonate isn't alkaline enough. You won't have traditional ramen unless you were to use sodium carbonate. You will end up with a noodle with less bite if you were to use baking soda. Just bake the sodium bicarbonate at 400-425F (not in a low oven like another poster is claiming) for 30 mins to an hour till its all become grainy rather than ...


0

The closest I've found to an oil that imparts no taste to foods is grapeseed oil. It's my go-to even for making fries.


2

sometimes i'll replace 1/2 the butter in my cookies with peanutbutter and will cut the sugar a little. they still turn out pretty well. replacing all the butter would be bad, but some of it won't make much of a difference.


1

Canola oil is a neutral oil (meaning it has little/no flavor of itself) so you need another neutral oil to work. If you want to avoid vegetable oil (which in USA usually means soybean oil), you can try peanut oil, sunflower oil, or safflower oil. These are all neutral oils and should not change the flavor of the recipe.


3

Typically when things are "canned in syrup" it's cane sugar and water. I'd guess soak dried coconut in water (or coconut water) to rehydrate it; drain & save excess water, add twice as much sugar (volume or weight as you like, close enough to the same) as water, heat to dissolve, add coconut back to it, stir - should be close-ish.



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