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The body can derive energy from three main "families" of molecules: Fat. This is the highest density, at about 9 KCalories a gram. There are varying recommendations regarding the amount of fat intake to be healthy, and most major medical establishments have been seriously wrong over the past decades. In my opinion, which works for my body alone, 20% of ...


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Cocoa butter is a cocoa solid. 70% chocolate means that 30% is sugar. The 70 % is made up of cocoa and cocoa butter (and usually a bit of vanilla).


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The only use of sugar in a curry is for its color. It gives a brown tint to the dish and is always used in least amount. If you put it for balancing spices then put a balanced amount of spices in the first place rather than balancing it later with sugar.


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Adding sugar does not make large changes in taste of recipes, A small quantity of sugar can be added to make it tasteful.


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In sum: YES, sugar DOES really help to extract fruit flavors. The answer quoted in the edit does NOT imply that "absorption is slowed down" in general. It merely states that in a sugar solution, sugar will generally not move out of fruit; it doesn't say anything about what else happens. Osmosis is simply a process by which the stuff on both sides of a ...


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Michael's answer is somewhat correct, but incomplete. Here's a relevant passage from a major food science book: Sugar addition: Sugar may be utilized in cooking. It offers flavor and some preservation. When large amounts of sugar (amounts greater than that found naturally in fruits) are added to the cooking water at the beginning of cooking, the ...


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Dupe, but a good question. See Satanicpuppies answer here: Brown sugar instead of white sugar I know you asked re: cranberry sauce specifically, but this is a great article regarding the differences in sugars, generically, which might help in the future: "Sugar can be a single molecule made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen—like glucose and fructose. ...


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I think you may well be over thinking this just a little. Water boils at 100c at sea level, sugar raises this temperature to around 110c depending on sugar content. Specifically, adding 1 gram molecular weight of nonionizing solute (like sugar) to 1 liter of water increases the boiling point by 0.52 degree Celsius (C). 1 gram molecular weight ...



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