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The brand name and type of your "raw sugar" can make some difference here. Using "Sugar in the Raw" (Turbinado sugar) would be similiar to using a light brown sugar, while using something that's legitimately less processed like Sucanat would yield a result more akin to a dark brown sugar due to the much higher molasses content. This is perfect if you're ...


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Granulated sugar is 100% sucrose with the molasses removed. Raw sugar on the other hand is refined sucrose with its natural molasses. The answer is yes, you can use them but you might need a bit of tweaking within the recipe. If your raw sugar looks a bit more like brown sugar then your chocolate chip cookies would come out more chewy (not that its a bad ...


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Make sure you add the Hot sugar syrup while still whisking and whisk the whites till they are cool the sugar syrup cooks the egg and kills any salmonella in the eggs


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The temperature of the caramel when you stop cooking will make a significant difference in the texture/solidity of the caramel product. This is what candy thermometers are for. For example, if you want: caramel sauce that remains soft when frozen : thread stage chewy caramel at room temperature : firm-ball stage caramel for popcorn : hard-crack stage It'...


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There is no "extra step". The recipe proportions determine which type you get. Standard caramel is just chewy. If you add fat or milk proteins (insider tip: try milk powder), it becomes soft. The more fat, the softer. Also, if you add liquid, it becomes liquid, and can be used as a sauce. The more liquid, the lower the viscosity. Also, it is a continuum, ...


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There is an obligatory steps when making italian meringue: Eggs with 1 week shelf life and less is better to make a great foam from it; Add some lemon juice to the egg white before whipping (not too much, just a little squeeze). Or you can add a half a teaspoon of tartar cream; Your sugar syrup should be from a range of 118 C to 121 C, and the egg white ...


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Scaling out a recipe is often more difficult than just "multiplying" the ingredients. In the Book Ratio they have a chapter on Custard: The standard ratio is bedrock, 2 to 1; 16 ounces milk blended with 8 ounces (4 large) eggs will result in 24 ounces of an excellent custard. Large eggs are about 2 ounces each, which makes custards easy to manage ...



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