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2

Commercial eggnog virtually ALWAYS has nutmeg in it, so you are just adding to that. While it's easy to grab the stuff, it's worth making your own eggnog if you'd like to raise your 'nog experience several notches. I can't imagine grinding nutmeg at home - that would take a heck of a grinder, and it would be hard to do less than a whole nutmeg at a time, ...


3

Add it if you like! As mentioned in the comments, eggnog usually already has nutmeg in it, so when you say you say you can't taste anything other than nog, in reality you're probably tasting eggnog including nutmeg! If what you add is pre-ground, the flavor probably isn't terribly strong. And even with freshly grated nutmeg, you're probably only adding a ...


0

Joe and Stephie's recommendations of simple syrup and superfine sugar are the best way to go in my opinion, but if you're lazy, in a hurry, or don't have superfine sugar, you can make a "poor man's" simple syrup by kickstarting it with hot water. For instance, if following a mojito recipe that calls for 1 oz of simple syrup -- which is normally made with ...


4

Lemonade is of course all about balancing the sweet and the sour. It stands to reason that if you're trying to amp up the sweetness, you can either add more sugar (the opposite of the goal here) or reduce its opposite, the sour. Reducing both sugar and the acid is equivalent to diluting your lemonade, so one of the first things you could try is simply ...


20

Most cocktails use sugar syrup (e.g. simple syrup with a water to sugar ratio of 1:1 or 1:2) instead of granulated sugar. This eliminates the need to dissolve the grains in - typically cold - liquids. When you consider powdered (confectioner's) sugar because of the smaller grain size, remember that they will most likely contain anti-caking agents like ...


13

You should use 'superfine' sugar, which is broken down much smaller so that it'll dissolve better in cold liquids. You can make your own by putting some sugar into a food processor and whizzing it around for a bit. You can also make a simple or heavy syrup, so you don't have to worry about sugar dissolving. Heavy syrup will keep longer in the fridge, as ...


3

Yes, the sugar will temporarily draw some moisture from the meat. However, that sugar/water solution will also gradually diffuse into the meat, and the sugar will end up pulling in more water in the long-term. In any case, the effect is usually small, and any (probably temporary) moisture loss will only be from the outermost 1/8" or so of meat, which will ...


2

If the seal is intact it's probably okay. Make sure you hear the "pop" when you open it. If there is no strange smell and it looks alright, then I think it will be fine.


0

Just put in a couple of apple slices and the brown sugar softens like magic. Remember to taie the apple out otherwise it will mold


0

Given that Masala based curries always get some sweetness from tomatoes (which could be anything from sour to rather sweet), and it is generally a good idea to balance tomato based sauces of all kinds with sweet (sugar, jaggery)/sour (yoghurt, vinegar) ingredients at the end, how could one find fault with this?


1

If you heated the eggs above 160°F/70°C (and boiling is definitely above that), they're cooked, and any harmful bacteria has been killed. Can't say for sure that you did this without knowing the steps you performed. Given, if it doesn't taste good, and it was cheap ingredients... sounds like an argument to discard it anyway. Even if its perfectly safe. ...


2

Cider vinegar is generally a little bit sweeter and not quite as sharp as white wine vinegar. With the other flavors you're adding, the difference isn't likely to be major. A good approach might be to hold back about a quarter of the sugar in the recipe, taste, and adjust to preference. One thing in the cider vinegar's favor is that most of the acid present ...



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