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As you probably know, the creaming step is important. Sugar crystals cut up the fat and make a lot of air pockets. If liquid is added early then the sugars dissolve and creaming doesn't happen. If there is too little sugar it is less effective. If there is too much sugar the fat is reduced to a crumbly mass and is not fluffy. Your recipe calls for a ...


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This article tells you all you need to know about brown and white sugar and cookies: Cookie Fact #9: White Sugar = Thin and Crisp, Brown Sugar = Tall and Moist A mixture of the two provides a good balance, and as I noticed in my egg tests, dissolving too much sugar can lead to a texture that's too uniform. With sugar left in distinct grains, the pockets of ...


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Brown sugar is just white granulated sugar with molasses added. Dark brown sugar just has more molasses than light brown sugar. Coffee shops often have turbinado sugar, a common brand is Sugar in the Raw. Turbinado sugar is brown because it is less refined than white sugar. The turbinado sugar is less "wet" than brown sugar, so it will dissolve ...


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Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


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If you are using pectin in your recipe, you want to minimize the the cooking time of the combined pectin and sugar (overcooking lowers the gelling power of the pectin). When using liquid pectin, you cook your fruit and sugar together and add the pectin at the end of cooking. If you are using powdered pectin, you cook the fruit and pectin together (so the ...


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If you add lots of sugar to the fruit early (whether you are already cooking it, or before cooking), you will create osmotic pressure and draw the juice out MUCH quicker. This might be a desirable (if you want to just get the juice out and thicken it) or very undesirable (if you are trying to caramelize instead of stew the fruit).


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You need the juices from the fruit to release so the sugar can melt into it. If you add it before then the sugar will burn. In making preserves, there are only two steps, cook fruit till juices release, then add sugar and stir till dissolved.


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I don't think a spoonful of sugar, honey, etc added to a loaf to encourage the yeast will make much of a difference. Sugar can act as a preservative but only at pretty high concentrations, and the amount you use in bread isn't going to be high enough. My experience is that home-made bread will get stale long before it gets moldy. I've seen supermarket bread ...


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I brew Kombucha and use Organic but refined sugar. This helps especially when cooler temps come and the brewing time slows down because of it. The harder you make food available for the scoby the slower the brew time. With a slower brew time comes a higher risk of contamination. Remember that the sugar isn't for you, it's to feed the scoby If you flavor ...



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