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3

The only reason to sweeten a dish like this is personal taste, you could add less or leave it out, it's not essential for a beef casserole. It could be a substitute for molasses, although why you'd add 1/2 cup of molasses to a beef casserole it beyond me. As for why it's in there who knows? It may be when the recipe was first made that some of the ...


1

I do not see the general advice about substituting a quarter of the sugar in baking recipes with powdered milk. For example, if a recipe calls for 1 cup / 200 g of sugar, use ¾ cup / 150 g of sugar and ¼ cup / 50 g powdered milk instead. This reduces the overall amount of sugar (even though milk contains lactose) but should not affect the consistency. ...


9

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


2

Just like when making fudge, Mother used to fold this by hand in a metal bowl on her lap. Honestly I think it's the slight impartation of body temperature which induces the sugar granules (microgranules) to break down a bit, you know, just this side of syrup. The smallest taste every once in awhile marks your progress. (It was really nice to be reminded of ...


1

Follow all of Layna's answer, and also sift the sugar, and keep everything at room temperature. If you use milk, only a half teaspoon. Remember you can't rush perfection. The trick with all cooking baking and even life is patience.


3

This can have different reasons. How long did you mix it? The transition between grainy and creamy can come late and suddenly, but it should happen eventually. Was the butter cold? I have been getting the best results with room-temperature butter. Did you sieve the powdered sugar? If not, that may be the problem. Or did it perhaps get wet at some point ...


2

I usually grate my jaggery block on a microplane grater although your standard cheese grater will work too. I haven't tried a food processor yet, although that would probably work. Next time I'm going to get granulated palm sugar as I've found working with a jaggery block too much hassle.


2

There may well be more than one issue here. The type of butter. If you're using what is sometimes sold as "cooking butter" then this has a much lower moisture content than normal butter, and so it is very difficult to get the sugar to dissolve enough to cream. Sugar choice. Granulated sugar is much more difficult to cream than than caster (superfine) sugar ...


1

just like you I am in the uk and I bought all the ingredient from Amazon uk hope this helps, my gran use to make this ginger wine when I was a child so I am going to attempt to make it for Christmas as I am not allowed alcohol, good luck,



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