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1

If all you have is a 1/3 cup then you can get 1/2 cup by adding 1/3 + a half of 1/3. So you measure 1/3 and put it into another container, then fill the 1/3 cup half-way and then add that to the container.


4

The math answer: 1/2 = 3/6 1/3 = 2/6 So (3/6) - (2/6) = 1/6 cups As 1 cup is 237 ml, 1/6 is about 40 ml. 40 ml is two tablespoons (15ml each) plus 2 teaspoons (5 ml each). To fill 1/3 to make 1/2 cup add 2 tblsp + 2 tsp. The lifehack answer: Dump the 1/3 of a cup into a 1/2 cup and fill it up.


0

In some regions, processing methods for commonly marketed sugar types are known to use or not use refining techniques using animal-derived ingredients. Some vegetarians will prefer the types not using such technique, or even avoid those that do.


1

Some formulations of dextrins can extend shelf life, though that's only kind-of-sort-of a sugar solution. One example is MoisturLok, which is primarily aimed at preventing staling, but its ability to reduce available water also lowers microbial counts on baked goods over a few days.


1

I have been baking with honey and molasses for some time now and I see no much differences except that dough and bread gets much dark brown colour.


0

From my experience, sugar syrups don't last too long (a month tops in the refrigerator). You may be able to prolong their shelf life by adding something acidic, or anti-microbial (I think some spices may work) but not by much. As for jams, I don't think it's the sugar that preserves them so much as the acidity or heat from canning/preserving. Sucrose is ...



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