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34

It removes excess starch, so your sushi rice doesn't turn into nasty glutinous slop. The texture of the rice is very important, so you'll need to rinse it several times before you steam it. Make sure the water is nice and clear after the last time you rinse it, and make sure you buy japonica or similar: if you use regular rice, you may not get good results. ...


33

"Sushi grade" means that it is safe to prepare and eat raw. In order to do that, it must be frozen to kill any parasites. That means it either has to be: Frozen at -20° C (-4° F) for 7 days; or Frozen at -35° C (-31° F - "flash frozen") for 15 hours. There aren't any official regulations about the fish itself or its quality, and most sushi/sashimi ...


24

This is perfectly normal, however, I find the common claim that "it is to prevent parasites" a bit dubious (I would think that it would have to be uniformly applied to the entire fish to have any measurable effect). The wasabi is really there to add flavor. In really high-end sushi restaurants in Japan, for example, it is relatively uncommon for the guest ...


20

"Plastic chocolate" is a form of chocolate used for modeling and shaping decorative elements such as chocolate roses, ribbons and other elements for cakes and desserts. Take about 1 lb. of bittersweet chocolate and melt over a double boiler. When chocolate is melted, stir in 2/3 cup of light corn syrup. Mix until evenly blended and then set aside to cool. ...


19

There are a few tools you should have that are out of the ordinary in a typical American kitchen: Sushi rolling mat - It's really the only way to make maki (rolls). Pro tip: when you use it, put it inside of a large zip-loc bag. This helps prevent the rice sticking to the mat. Wooden sushi bowl - This is essential in helping the rice turn out properly. The ...


18

All of the following are generally cooked items: Shrimp, ebi, available raw in sashimi, but almost always lightly poached. The poaching brings out sweet and subtle flavors otherwise masked by a metallic tang. It also prevents the highly perishable shrimp from losing texture to spoilage. Octopus, tako, available raw in sashimi when sliced very thinly, but ...


16

ok get a very sharp knife (straight blade) put the blade under water tap the blade on the counter to rid of excess water cut roll in half repeat the process on the two portions make sure that you're using a long knife, and when you're cutting, don't seesaw, rather it should be one fluid motion EDIT or do it as the comment below says :P


16

I discussed a similar subject in this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" fish? Raw fish isn't safe to eat if it's just been sitting around. However, the raw fish used in sushi/sashimi has been frozen (typically flash-frozen) in order to kill any parasites, making it as safe as any other food. Most distributors of sashimi also have their own methods ...


16

Omakase. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omakase


16

Even with the same fish, sashimi and ceviche are very different dishes: Sashimi is sliced, raw fish that is in its natural state. Note the glossy, translucent nature of the slices: Sashimi is also just the fish, although the plate may have additional garnishes. Ceviche is technically uncooked, but has been marinated in citrus juice which coagulates ...


14

I'm assuming these rolls contain raw fish. If that's the case I'd urge you not to eat them raw the following day. It might be safest to just throw it out, but you could try deep frying them in a light tempura batter. Just a few minutes should be enough to cook the fish.


14

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


13

There is no real definition of 'sushi grade' fish. It's purely a marketing term to imply a higher quality piece of fish. There are some actions that should be done for tuna (really for all fish, but especially for tuna) when they are caught, such as bleeding them immediately, destroying the neural canal, reducing the temperature of the fish immediately, ...


13

Like many crafts which originated in Japan, their sushi training more or less creates sushi artisans. If you just want to make a snack, you'll have plenty of ability given a basic review of techniques. You should focus your learning on understanding food-safety, getting the rice right, and making the roll not fall apart. The rest is just levels of mastery ...


13

Japanese spicy mayo is made with Kewpie mayo and Shichimi tōgarashi. You really just mix them to taste.


12

So I made this. It worked out really well. The recipe leaves some room for improvement, but overall, I was happy with the way it turned out. I rolled out the chocolate, pressed crumpled tin foil in, and then made the nori. The dish put together. Dessert for four. I used reverse spherification of peach puree for the caviar, sliced peaches as ...


12

It's been a while since I made sushi but 2 tablespoons does sound a little on the ridiculous side. Various other recipes use similar amounts (to each other): AllRecipes: 1 tsp salt (for 1/2 cup vinegar and 4 tbsp sugar) Alton Brown: 1 tbsp kosher salt (for 2 tbsp vinegar and 2 tbsp sugar) SushiRecipes: 1 tsp salt (for 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/2 cup sugar) ...


11

Keep your hands wet. I usually use a small bowl of water next to my prep area, and dip my fingers in whenever things get sticky.


10

Sushi does not require fish, sushi is the style of rice preparation (rice, salt, a little rice vinegar, occasionally some kombu). So long as you have the correct preparation of rice, you technically have some form of sushi (you could just throw it in a bowl with some additions on top and have a type of sushi called chirashizushi). Second, there is no such ...


10

That's not really true in any meaningful way, and has nothing to do with sushi. It sounds like the author was just trying to make it sound scandalous to attract attention. It's a really, really sensationalized version of something true about at least some species of shrimp. They're essentially all born male, so before they can reproduce, naturally, some of ...


9

Keep it airtight in a cool, dark place and it should remain good infefinitely. You'll certainly be fine 1-2 years.


9

Don't wait too long to eat it. I'm assuming you're talking about rolls, or makimono, rather than nigiri-zushi. Anyway, assuming the nori was reasonably freshly opened and crispy when you started, that's the main risk you have: within minutes of preparing makimono, the moisture of the rice will quickly transfer to the dry laver. The faster you eat it, the ...


9

Rinsing rice Simple - rinse off the extra starch so it's not too sticky. This isn't magic. You're just getting rid of some starch before you go on to the next step. Some people advocate soaking the rice here as well. It's perfectly possible to make sushi rice without doing that, though, just rinsing. The soaking just helps make it easier to get the layer of ...


8

Rice that says 'not to rinse' has already been cleaned and enriched with vitamins because of the nutrients removed in milling. Rinsing it will remove the vitamins. Rices that have not been cleaned and enriched need to be rinsed because they are dirty and sometimes have a powder added after milling. Sticky rice definitely needs to be rinsed several times, ...


8

Wash the shrimp and remove only the head. Insert a bamboo skewer along the shrimp from head to tail, running along the legs without touching flesh Drop into boiling, salted water for 3-5 minutes (do not put a lid on); after this period, they'll change color and rise to the top. If they feel firm, they are cooked. Quickly place them into ice water, which ...


8

Most seafood counters will sell you small vacuum sealed portions of frozen fish. The fish is often frozen on the ship where it is caught and so will be fresher than even if you bought it at the dock. The freezing will also kill any parasites and is the only prerequisite for the label "sushi grade". See this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" ...


8

The traditional knife for sushi and sashimi is the yanagi sashimi. It features a long blade (approx 10in or 270mm) that has a chisel ground blade which is often hollow ground on the back, called urasaki. The long blade allows you to cut thin slices in one continuous motion so that you don't you don't have slashes marks from changing direction. There are ...


8

I assume you're making normal maki (nori side out) and not California rolls. Are you leaving a 1/2 inch or so of blank nori (no rice) on the outside edge (the edge that you roll last)? If you slightly wet the bare edge of the nori with a little water on your finger it should help it stick together.


7

I have never made, but I have eaten Arborio sushi, with Italian flavors and here in DC I have had latin-flavored sushi. It was all great. The Arborio sushi seemed like plain Arborio rice to me. The rice vinegar is sweet and less acid (4% versus 6%), so if you try different vinegars you may want to dilute it a bit first and then compare for sweetness. ...


7

Circular bed of sticky sushi rice, topped with a drizzle of spicy mayo as the sauce and chunks of sashimi. cut into pizza slices.



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