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18

A syrup is by definition a thick sweet liquid made using sugar. If you are looking to make a thick savory liquid, perhaps you want to look into thickening agents. Starches and plant-based gums are the most common thickening agents. Some examples include: Starches: arrowroot, cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca Plant-base gums: guar gum, xanthum gum, alginin ...


11

I do exactly that. I use a clear plastic squeeze bottles. I fill a mug 2/3 full with sugar, and top up with boiling water, stir, cool, funnel into the squeeze bottle, and keep in the fridge door. The squeeze bottle makes it easier to get the right amount of sugar into your beverage. I don't even worry about keeping it sealed. There's nothing much to ...


11

Golden Syrup improves with age according to Heston Blumenthal's "In Search of Perfection". Here he analyses a 70 year old glass jar of Tate and Lyle Gold in the lab finding that the "older treacle contained the same flavour compounds as the normal stuff, but each was intensified". In his recipe he fakes the ageing process by baking the tin at 70ºC (158ºF) ...


11

You aren't actually trying to cook anything. When you heat a solution, it makes dissolving a solid in to that solution much easier. So you can dissolve more sugar in to hot water than cold water. With a 1:1 ratio, you wouldn't be able to get all the sugar in to solution with cold water. So, you heat the water to allow more sugar to become part of the ...


9

Another option is to get one of the plunger type measuring cups. Once you push out the ingredient, you can use a spatula or spoon to scrape the end of the spatula. This works great for honey, molasses, syrup etc. http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/kitchen/b78b/?cpg=froogle


8

Put the bowl on a scale and put the difficult ingredients directly from their packaging into the bowl. That way, you don't have to clean up any measuring utilities and waste no ingredients.


8

Simple Syrup is sugar that is has been dissolved in water. Heating speeds the process, and also allows the water to "absorb" more sugar. I don't remember the chemistry of why the sugar doesn't crystallize at room temp, but it doesn't. It is typically made in a 1:1 mixture .. heat a cup of water to boiling, add a cup of sugar, stir until the sugar is ...


8

There are a couple of things you can do to prevent sugar crystallising. You can add some glucose syrup, or you can 'invert' the sugar by adding some acid, namely cream of tartar. Both should be readily available, online if not at your supermarket. Cream of tartar is also useful when making meringue.


8

When heating sugar up in boiled icing or in making candy, the problem is sugar crystallization. This happens because the solution becomes supersaturated and any movement can cause it to shift back into a crystal state. The corn syrup is there to prevent this from happening by providing glucose to 'get in the way'. You can get just 'glucose' at the ...


8

Golden syrup is indeed gluten free, as neither sugar cane or beet contains gluten. In fact, beet fibre is used in many gluten-free products. See the Tate & Lyle site for more information: http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/healthandnutrition.php


7

I did a little research and found this page which has a modified sugar syrup recipe for a substitute. In case the link breaks: Ingredients: 2 cups sugar 3/4 cup water 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar (spelling corrected by me) dash of salt Directions: Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer and put a ...


7

The key factor in syrup's shelf life is the water activity in the syrup, rather than the ingredients used to make it. Generally, the water is all 'bound up' with dissolved sugar so microorganisms can't use it to grow, but the lighter the syrup, the more available water it will have. In my experience, simple syrup is usually kept refrigerated except for ...


6

All right, I'll say it as an answer: fructose is one sugar, glucose is another. High fructose corn syrup contains plenty of fructose (but not just that) - it's made by taking corn syrup and converting some glucose to fructose to make it taste sweeter. The exact sugar makeup of glucose syrup varies (see also this previous question), but it certainly hasn't ...


6

This is likely due to capillary action drawing the syrup up the tube from the bottle - viscous syrup + a narrow tube = strong capillary action. Since it's one of those pesky laws of nature, there's not a lot you can do about it. You might try transferring the syrup to a container with a wider pump tube (since capillary action is stronger in a narrow tube). ...


6

Honeycomb can be made with honey or molasses but the flavor will not be the same. There isn't a US equivalent - we have molasses, but it's darker. You can substitute corn syrup in recipes where it isn't the principal ingredient, but here that would not work. That being said, my local grocery store has a British food section which carries golden syrup. You ...


6

Well, you can't really make "elderberry syrup" (as the term is usually understood) from only elderberry extract. Fruit syrups are generally produced from a mixture of fresh berries, sugar, and water, which is cooked and then often strained. You could perhaps make "elderberry-flavored" simple syrup by combining sugar and water, cooking it down to your ...


5

Spray whatever you are going to measure it into with pan release (Pam) first. Or if you don't have that, rub it with a tiny amount of vegetable oil. You can do this whether it is the bowl for the scale as eckes rightly mentioned, or a measuring cup. Same trick works with molasses and honey.


5

As far as I understand the basic chemistry, golden syrup should do well for you. A different option is to dissolve a lot of sugar in some hot water and then to slowly reduce it to the right consistency, which should be more or less identical to corn syrup.


5

I can't address "better," but it may be different. When you make simple syrup, you boil the sugar water for some amount of time. The effect of boiling the sugar water is to break down some of the sucrose into its component sugars, glucose and fructose. The result is somewhat sweeter than the same amount of merely-dissolved sucrose.


5

My experiment with table sugar, pouring 1/2 cup of table sugar into a glass container then pouring in 1/2 cup of water on top without stirring resulted in the water line reaching the 3/4 cup mark after a few seconds of absorption. So the ratio of the volume of separated sugar and water to the mixture is 3:4.


5

6 TBS (3 ounces by volume) of granulated sugar, mixed with 4 liquid ounces of water (1/2 cup US), brought to a hard boil in the microwave yielded just over 6 liquid ounces of syrup. (A drop of color added for readability) I would suspect that it didn't reach 7 ounces because of the air included in the volumetric measurement of granulated sugar. So 4 cups ...


4

My favorite saying is When in doubt throw it out. Having said that you should throw that away. The black can either be from the oxidization of the tin or it could be mold growth. In either case golden syrup only has a shelf life of about two years; or one year after being opened, and it should be refrigerated after opening. The granulation could be fixed by ...


4

If you can find it, glucose syrup is an excellent substitute. It's arguably healthier, preferred in confectionery work, about half as sweet as corn syrup, and a 1:1 substitute in most cases (except for the sweetness). Here in the US, I have to order mine from Amazon, but it's worth a look in your local stores.


4

If treacle would make a good substitute, what about molasses? I think your idea of maple syrup would probably be delicious, so if you have that, it's what I'd try!


4

Well, it's basically a Pecan Pie, and there are tons of Pecan Pie recipes that don't include corn syrup. The most common substitution is brown sugar: you can go roughly 1-to-1, but you'll need to increase the amount of butter, and you might as well just replace the white sugar with brown as well. (so, in this case, 2 cups DARK brown sugar (packed), and 1/2 ...


4

Concerning "difficult" ingredients and measuring volumetric amounts with a scale: You only have to measure volumetricly ONCE! Once I know that my honey weighs 20 grams per tablespoon (I tared the scale with the wax paper, the measuring spoon and the lid that I used to balance the spoon) I can take that weight and run with it. 1 cup of my honey will ...


4

Dextrose in powder form is very easy to get a hold of! As mentioned before, it is a very common ingredient in brewing, and is readily available from homebrew stores. While not as cheap as traditional table sugar, it isn't expensive either. Search online to see if there are any homebrew stores local to you. Here's one place to get it. And another place ...


4

I always throw in some corn syrup when make a simple syrup. The extra glucose adds some "chaos" to the mix and keeps the crystals from forming their structure. I also like to add some cream of tartar to help break up the sucrose in the table sugar into its component parts of fructose and glucose.


4

I don't have a recipe for a sorbet without any fruit contributing sugar, but I do have something very close: the lemon sorbet from The Perfect Scoop. It uses a cup of lemon juice, which contains only 6 g of sugar, along with 2.5 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar. So 3.5 cups (828 mL) of water with 1 cup (200 g) of sugar should be good, or a ratio of 4:1 by ...


4

Sugar syrup of such high concentration has practically the same shelf life as candy. You don't have to refrigerate it. Bacteria practically can't live in it. You can keep it for months, and it expires because its taste goes off at some point, not because it becomes unsafe. If something goes wrong and the sugar concentration isn't high enough after all, the ...



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