Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

White, green, oolong, and black tea are all products of Camellia sinensis leaves and buds, the only difference is how they are processed. You can turn the plant matter into any of the varieties. Different sources will give different accounts of the processing steps, but in rough order of least-to-most processed: White tea is minimally processed and not ...


22

Tea bags will be fine for at least a year in the pantry, but even long after that, they're still safe to consume. They just might change colour or flavour. If your tea has an expiration date then it's just for best quality, not safety. I've personally found tea bags sitting at the back of the pantry that were more than 3 years old, the packaging had even ...


16

It's hard to know exactly what you're referring to without any context of the event, location, or what you remember it tasting like, so I'll give you my best educated guesses. If your pink tea sweet and fruity or floral, it was an herbal tea - tisane, and not true tea. ("Tea" actually refers to the plant whose leaves are used the beverage. Anything that is ...


15

The most likely culprits are: Steeping too long: 1-3 minutes, depending on the type and grade of tea. Using water that is too hot or too cold: Again, this depends on the type and grade of tea. Here is an excellent resource for getting these factors right: On Steeping Time: Green tea does not require much time. Too long a steeping time will result in ...


14

There is apparently evidence that some of the flavour compounds in honey deteriorate during heating: http://www.ibra.org.uk/articles/Effect-of-heat-on-honey The text suggests that honey should not be heated to more than 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit). So it might be wise to let the tea cool down a bit before adding the honey. Having said that, ...


14

In the interests of science I gave this a try. Used a can of carbonated water, boiled in my kettle. There was no boiling water explosion, although I more than half expected one. It seemed to maybe boil a little faster, but that's more likely due to the fact that it's less liquid than I usually heat. Being a tea fanatic I have a lot of flavored teas but I ...


13

The main reason you put boiling water in the teapot before making tea is to heat up the teapot. You dump out the now cooler water and then add your teabags and more boiling water, and the teapot will now be warm and not leech out the temperature from within it. This results in tastier tea, but is totally not necessary if you didn't make enough hot water, or ...


13

Hotter water leads to more caffeine release and a more bitter flavor as it cooks the leaves. If you're serious about the taste of tea, set up four cups and pour water into them: The first boiling, the next after 30 seconds, and on down. Use a cracker between each sip; the later teas should taste slightly lighter and sweeter, and the middle two especially ...


12

The equivalent of coffee beans would be loose leaf teas. This is the traditional way to enjoy tea, and is generally preferred by tea connoisseurs. Just like whole-bean coffee, loose leaf tea keep fresh longer than bagged tea, and generally has a richer flavor. Tea bags are generally prepared by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process, which breaks up the leaves ...


12

Storing Tea You tea should never become bitter due to your storage methods. The only thing that should happen to tea as a result of how you store it is general loss of flavor or loss of the complexity of flavor (in a green tea, you might lose any honey or fruit notes of a tea that has been improperly stored, but it'll still taste like green tea). There ...


11

The differences in quality between teas is usually down to the manufacturer and the product line. As far as I can tell, there is no discernible difference between Twining's English Breakfast tea (for instance) in bags or loose leaf. They are the same leaves, presented differently. However, and this is the important part, there is a difference in how they ...


11

Either buy a cheap electric kettle, or if you are really fussed about not re-boiling water then shell out a bit more for one of the single cup hot water dispensers like the Tefal Quick Cup or the Breville Hot Cup. We have both a cheap kettle and a Breville Hot Cup in our office. The kettle is good for making cups for multiple people at the same time, the ...


11

Rate Tea tells us this is a myth: Many tea companies, and even some reputable entities such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have made misleading generalizations about the caffeine content of broad classes of tea. It is a widespread myth that black tea contains more caffeine than green tea, and another myth that white tea contains the least ...


10

TL;DR = The sweet tea takes longer to cool down because there is a lot more stuff in it to get cold. When cooling unsweetened tea, you are cooling almost pure water (the tea solids are negligible). A 12 ounce glass of unsweetened tea has about, you guessed it, 12 oz (by weight) of liquid to cool, or 340 grams (mass). Southern-style sweet tea (if this is ...


10

When you boil water in a cup in a microwave, it will often boil without forming bubbles, because unlike a kettle with a rough heating element or inner surface, a clean ceramic cup has few nucleation points. Nucleation points allow pockets of gas to form, which become bubbles as the water boils. When you add the teabag to the hot water, you are essentially ...


10

Hojicha is a green tea which is made from bancha, a low grade green tea, and cooked slightly; this very inexpensive green tea often comes out brown because it is discolored by oxidation. Other than this variety, and some very stale bancha, I can't think of a Japanese green tea that comes out brown. Some stale kukicha might come out brown, and low quality ...


9

Interesting question. My first thought would be to try just poaching the fish in the tea. That should transfer more of the flavour than, say, steaming it. Google finds this recipe where they use an unnamed green tea.


9

This seems like a case where a very simple A/B comparison will give you the answer for your own personal preference. Just use two identical mugs and do everything else the same except cover one and not the other. If you really want to make it official, put a mark on the bottom of one mug and then have someone else randomize them while you look away. (p.s. ...


9

It boils down to temperature (pun intended). According to Wikipedia the ideal temperature to brew coffee is 200°F, which is about 93°C. That is, the temperature is a little below the boiling point of water (which is 100°C). That is just boiling the water and pouring it over the beans will result in too hot a temperature. With a standard coffee machine like ...


9

I believe that 'English Breakfast Tea' is a very broad definition and doesn't refer to an exact blend; each manufacturer has their own version of it. I would say that English Breakfast Tea often includes Assam, but as your Wiki source suggests it also contains other teas. Therefore Assam is a separate tea.


9

I've been drinking loose-leaf tea at work for many years now, and have gone through most of these. cup with a ceramic or glass strainer. I've tried both the ceramic type with holes and the glass type with slots. The mesh is never fine enough for me. In addition the holes or slots invariably get packed with leaves and are a pain to clean. steel ...


9

Much of the flavor and aroma of tea comes from volatile oils/compounds. The heat applied to tea leaves while steeping them is key to releasing those volatile compounds but when you reboil the tea, a large portion the flavor compounds in the water are likely just going to be vaporized. The end result is the reheated tea will have very little 'tea' flavor ...


9

The problem is that "herbal tea" is a very broad category. Some herbs, like woody stems or roots, require a bit more "decocting," which the higher temperature helps with. Ginger or ginseng root, pine needles, rose hips, sarsaparilla, and similar plant bits all fit this bill, and some of those I'd honestly go ahead and boil for some time, not just steep. But ...


8

You can also get a water filter that is meant to help with this sort of thing. Here in the UK one of the most common brands is Brita, you simply put a couple of litres in a jug which has a filter in it, after filtration use it to make your tea. I've not used it myself however so can't comment on its effectiveness. You can also get these filters built into ...


8

If purity is top priority I can only recommend an 18 Mega Ohm laboratory purifier, complete with biofilters and UV. I assure you, you've never tasted anything like it. In fact you can't taste anything at all, it's quite a bizarre experience to drink. If they are so awkward as to not let you install one in the office then you might have to bring the water ...


8

You could try using arrowroot. This is a widely available alternative to cornstarch - it is used in cookery because it doesn't turn liquids cloudy like cornstarch does. In your case, it might work better as it also has a more neutral flavour. Substitute 2 tbsps of arrowroot for 1 tbsp cornstarch, and make a slurry with cool water as you would cornstarch. ...


8

I've never known the science behind it, but water heated in a microwave oven makes horrible tea and coffee. You need a kettle. The standard British teabag-and-mug technique (as opposed to the loose-tea-and-teapot technique) is: put cold tap water in kettle turn kettle on put teabag in mug allow kettle to come to full boil fill mug with freshly boiled ...


7

Growing up, we'd always make 'sun tea' -- you leave it in a warm place for ~8 hrs (we'd use a glass container in a south-facing window). If you forgot about it, and left it overnight, it was foul -- you start extracting some of the more difficult-to-extract substances in the tea that are very bitter. In the summer time, this could happen in under 16hrs. ...


7

Covering the mug may help insulate the tea/water, keeping it hotter. If you believe that a more consistent temperature produces a better cuppa, then covering would help (though how much is debatable). I'll leave it to someone else to provide arguments about the ideal steeping time and temperature. Someone might also make a case that covering the mug keeps ...


7

What brand of "green tea" are you drinking? What grade of "green tea" are you drinking? Do they come in a paper tea bag? Loose leaf? Green tea has such a large range. At the bottom end, you have generic tea bags that are simply labeled "green tea", these I find to be extremely harsh and taste like well, tea bags and maybe even "grass". Not to mention, if ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible