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9

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


4

Basic electric tea kettles primarily work by turning off when a bimetallic switch in the handle (probably at the bottom, where it will require some steam pressure to have steam travel down to) of the kettle is sufficiently heated to deform one of the metals, turning off the kettle. This switch is heated by steam, and the element itself is typically turned ...


3

Pure water boils when its vapour pressure equals atmospheric pressure. Pure water will only boil at 100 degrees at sea level if the atmosperic pressure happens to be 1 atmosphere (760mm of Hg) The boiling point of water therefore depends on two things. 1. How pure it is. 2. What the atmospheric pressure is where the water is being boiled. In general terms ...


1

Electric kettles regulate their set temperature with either a thermocouple or a resettable thermal fuse. Both devices are likely good to within 10% of their nominal value, and are affected by the amount of lime scale on the bottom of the pot. That means that the only way to be sure is with a thermometer; used not just once, but every week or two.


12

Seconds, not minutes. Just the act of pouring the water will cool it slightly. At sea-level pure water will be 100C at a full boil, the temperature will drop immediately when it's no longer being heated. This is unscientific at best, but just for giggles I put an accurate digital thermometer into a room temperature mug, and brought a couple of cups of cups ...


4

Assuming your kettle causes the water to boil (rapid escape of gas/bubbling) and that the water you are using is from a tap (not distilled) then it is very difficult to say exactly the temperature of your water at boiling, but it will be a small amount over 100 Celcius degrees (as impure water has a higher boiling point). To know when your water has reached ...


0

Sorry, just wanted to say that. Anyways, is I get: Lemon juice 100% lemon Boiled water My mug, of course Tea bag Milk Sugar So you want the water to come to a hot boil. When I say hot, I mean hot! You get at least a quarter cup of lemon juice and pour it in and add the hot water. Then you put the tea bag in, then add the sugar, milk, and sugar in the ...


2

I highly doubt that this practice would damage your macchinetta. It's a relatively simple device, and with simplicity comes durability. If finely-ground coffee won't plug the baskets and filters inside, then it's doubtful that much larger tea leaves will. As with normal (i.e. coffee) use, just ensure that the pressure release valves are unobstructed (you ...


1

By leaves, I would imagine you mean something like this: Will it damage the macchinetta? Quite possible. Depending on how much tea you put in the holding chamber, you might create a blockage in the moka pot which will lead to excess pressure build up in the water chamber and possible damage to the moka pot as well as shrapnel flying about. Is it going ...


2

Technically, your idea seems sound. But I wouldn't do it. What you are proposing to do in your electric kettle is very close to the standards for flash pasteurization. According to wikipedia, the standard procedure for flash pasteurization is to heat and circulate the liquid at 71.5 °C (160 °F) to 74 °C (165 °F), for about 15 to 30 seconds, which results in ...


2

You cannot boil water at 70 Celsius. Maybe this is a language problem; "boiling" means taking water to the state where there are lively bubbles popping on the surface all the time, and it is steaming profusely. It boils at 100 Celsius at sea level and a little bit below it when you get higher, but the difference isn't that much. Even in the highest towns in ...



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