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There are two factors here, both of which will limit you. The first is the solubility of caffeine in water. Paparazzi found it for room temperature, it is going to be higher for a hot beverage, but whatever it is, it is a hard upper limit. So, if you were to drop a tablet of 1 g pure caffeine into 100 ml water, and a tablet of 6 g into another glass of 100 ...


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3x tea would not mean 3x extract But it is going to be close to 3x for small amount Water is a good solvent for those chemicals but there is a limit The solubility of caffeine is 2 g/100 mL at room temperature (by weight about 1 : 50). 66 gram / 100 mL at boiling. A coke is 20 mg (milli 1/1000) 12 oz. The caffeine we drink is not even close to ...


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Yes, I think that they strainer does make a difference. I would say that they are best for nearly any tea leaf is the fine wire mesh strainer. Plastic mesh is probably second best and the glass or plastic with a few holes as the least desirable. When brewing whole leaf tea, you want to make sure that the leaves have enough room to bloom and open. If the ...


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It is safe to drink the tea made from tea leaves and it's safe if you eat the tea leaves themselves at the bottom of the cup. People avoid eating the leaves because they aren't pleasant tasting, the consistency isn't very nice, and they aren't that easy to digest.


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After further searching, I eventually found some answers, which was the following Google search string matcha with white tea https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=matcha&oq=matcha&aqs=chrome..69i57.489j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=matcha+with+white+tea Since this comes back with valid results I feel this is safe enough to assume it's ...


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Stephie's answer covers a couple convenient options: there are large ceramic pots, and any stainless steel vessel can work. (Traditionally, metal has been frowned upon for tea brewing because it loses heat too quickly, and many people are particular about maintaining a consistent temperature during brewing. I think that concern is overblown, particularly ...


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You can brew ice tea with cold water. In fact the results are usually a sweeter more refreshing tea ( I am not talking about sugar). Fill your glass container with cold water, use as much tea as you like for the quantity and let it steep for between an hour and hour + half. The cold water doesn't draw out the woodiness of the tannins like hot water does.


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A reasonably large teapot would probably the classic choice, 1-2 liter or up to 1/2 gallon should be available either online or from your local kitchen store. For those cases where a teapot is not available, any stainless steel (= non-reactive) cooking pot should do, up to your largest stock pot for big batches. They generally come with a lid, but you'd ...


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I happen to have a box of Twinnings English Breakfast Tea (as sold in the US), and the box states: Master Blender's notes: smooth, flavourful, robust. Colour: Brigh, Coppery-Red Strength: 3 / 4 Steep time: 4 minutes (recommended) English Breakfast is our most popular tea. To create this well-balanced blend, we carefully select the ...


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There are two main traits of tea which deliver the punch you talk about: Caffeine: this is a stimulant, and there is wide variation on the amount of caffeine in black teas depending on a number of factors. Here is a good article which goes into some detail on caffeine in tea. A simple way to put it is that variety doesn't mean much, one assam may have much ...



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