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1

I cook with tea all the time. Adding loose leaves works fine if you're comfortable with the flavor and the technique, but if you're not, just brew some and use the tea in place of water...This has the added benefit that you can be sure of the final flavor before you add it to the dish.


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Without a list of ingredients there's no way to know what else is in your sage tea, or what flavors it will impart to a dish. If the tea you get from the bag is pleasant then the flavor it imparts to the food should also be good, although sage is a very powerful herb and a whole tea bag of it would likely be far too much. My view on this is that while ...


3

"The addition of “phantom aromas,” such as vanilla, berry, citrus, bacon or even cheese, can distract the brain from acknowledging a bitter to taste." "Other additives can mask or “mitigate a bitter taste.” Lactisole, for example, made from carboxylic acid salt derived from Columbian coffee, can negate sweet taste. An allosteric modulator can change a food ...


2

Tea also contains tannins, which is the main cause of the bitterness - not the caffeine. You're adding something bitter to something that's already bitter, obviously increasing the bitterness, so I'm not sure what the point of the question is. The question should have been, "how do I mask the bitter taste of added caffeine in my tea". Milk, sugar, acid ...


4

Caffeine is bitter, tea isn't too bitter because as you mentioned it's only got 40mg of caffeine. If you then triple the amount in there it's going to taste that way. Try adding 3 tea bags to your cup and I'm certain it'll taste just as bitter. Energy drinks have copious amounts of sweeteners added hence why they don't taste like caffeine. If you are hell ...


1

If you're boiling them it isn't necessary to break them down at all unless time is a factor for you. Nutmeg also works well boiled whole as you can see in many traditional hot beverage recipes. However, if you want to be able to add all of the spices at once, grinding some of them is advisable. Otherwise you'll have to add the spices to your mixture at ...


0

Thermal shock is what is breaking your carafes. Simply stated, you're heating them up too rapidly and unevenly. While it's true a nice heat-resistant carafe is probably your best solution, you can also try heating up your glass carafe with hot tap water before pouring in your boiling water to temper the rapid increase in temperature. Pour in hot water to ...


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Another option (though probably more expensive than Erica's suggestion) is Corningware Pyroceram. It's a glass-ceramic, so it shouldn't absorb any odors. Originally all Corningware cookware was made of this material, but now its only some of their stuff. You can easily get these in 1.5 quart and larger sizes. Pyroceram can actually be used on a burner or ...


3

Heat-resistant glass is called for, which will be much better suited to withstand the thermal shock of boiling water than regular glass. I'd use a Pyrex measuring cup -- which are available in one quart (4 cup) sizes, my mother owns one. (I generally just stick with two 2 cups if I need that much liquid, but that won't work for your tea steeping process.) ...


1

Not sure if this is the situation in your case, but here's a possible stab. I hope it's informative (and correct!) anyway. :) Depending on the look of the leaves (can't tell from your link), you might have just the tips and buds, rather than fully formed and unfurled leaves. If this is the case, this can indicate higher quality (or at least more desirable, ...


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for chinese teas its important that your water is boiling hot as you pour it in otherwise the leaves wont unfurl. Just make sure it is super hot when it goes in the pot an cover it to keep the heat in.



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