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I use 1 rounded teaspoon for 12 to 16 ounces (depends on the mug I'm using), so about 8 teaspoons (or about 2 1/2 tbsp) for a gallon of water. Hot water, just under boiling, is best. Ideally, the water is heated and poured onto the tea at just under boiling. Because I don't think you want to boil a gallon of water, I'd use the amount of hibiscus for a ...


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I use 6 family size luzianne tea bags per 12 cups water. I brew in a 12 cup coffee maker minus a filter. The tea concentration is served 50% water / 50% tea and some ice. It never tastes diluted.


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Not mentioned here, but tea steepers are excellent for making cold brew coffee. Simply fill the tea container with medium to coarse grind beans, immerse with water, and leave overnight; in the morning you have a nice smooth cup of coffee. Typically the mixture is rather rich (almost espresso-like), so you can actually dilute it like americano and store the ...


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Sassafras tea will naturally taste a little bitter. When I was younger, a friend of mine used to bring us some sassafras root in order for us to make this tea. He always recommended never to make it too strong because of the affects of the bitterness on the stomach. Try using smaller doses of sassafras in your tea. It should be more on the pale shade of ...


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To back up what I say, I can site lots of articles that said said all sorts of things. Some that made sense, others not. Although I put it all together as such. Some black teas are premium ones (labelled Assam, Ceylon, Darjeeling, Nilgiri, Keemun, Souchong, and Yunnan). Also estate Africa blacks and good grade South/Central American ones which they also have ...


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If the tea was distilled water, a 5% solution would have been sufficient. That is, you'd need 50 grams of acid to 950 grams of water. The problem is, the impurities of the water and the tea itself buffer it somewhat, so it's impossible to predict the exact amount you need. You'll have to use a pH meter, and an accurate one, not strips, to make a pH solution ...


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My mom, who would have been 100 years old by now, always told us that reboiling the water leaves the water a bit "stale" tasting. She talked of "Free Oxygen", which I believe was her way of saying Dissolved Oxygen. I think DO is what fish actually get through their gills, which is why fish in a bowl need to get fresh water (with DO at high enough levels) ...


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The problem with cheap breakfast teas, supermarket pekoes and low end earl greys/chais is that many of them use the dust of tea processing and not the real leaves. Black teas can vary highly in quality from Ceylon (high grown), premium Assam and Darjeeling and Keemuns to Nilgiri and also other China blends (Yunnan, Souchongs) and Nepal blends. They can also ...


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You have to rinse pu-erh tea at least once. http://www.teavivre.com/info/brew-an-enjoyable-pu-erh-tea/


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Speaking very generally, there are three bands of quality when it comes to black tea in the UK Market. Brown (Economy) is your lowest grade, it is the cheapest in the shops and usually very dusty and fibrous. The flavor is weak and the color with milk is a dull brown.Teas can come from central Africa, south India, Argentina and the middle east. Red is the ...



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