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3

Just to provide an official source, the USDA's National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF) says this: Question 4: What minimum time/temperature parameters for hot holding would ensure food safety? . . . For non-continuous temperature and time monitoring, a minimum hot holding temperature of 130 degrees Fahrenheit ...


5

Recipes for fruitcake vary tremendously, without more information there isn't any way to say how long and at what temperature. I looked at several recipes, and none called for a bain marie, but some do recommend a pan of water below the cake to provide moist heat. You might find this Food Network Recipe helpful, because it gives directions for various cake ...


2

As a rule, frozen foods that are fully cooked do not have that requirement. If the label says "fully cooked", you can eat it still frozen if you want. Where have you seen "fully cooked" and "must be cooked before serving" on the same label? Here is a typical example. The directions say "until warm" for esthetic reasons only. There is no need to reach 165F, ...


1

You can count on foods identified as "fully cooked" to be fully cooked. The heating requirements protect against foodborne illness and also insure that the flavor and consistency of the foods is restored to levels appropriate for most expectations. Depending on the recommended heating method, much of the food might appear to be piping hot while the center ...


3

I am trying to think of anything that would refute this notion, but I cannot -- there is no reason you should not be able to hold a liquid at those temperatures for an indefinite period of time. So long as you are reconstituting the mixture with water that is not contaminated, and doing so slowly enough to drop the temperature of the system below 130F, you ...


0

Or go for 5-7 hours on low Though, yes, a longer cook time on low is not likely to harm what you're cooking (and, yes, it may be helpful to know what it is that you're cooking), if you're determined to use this machine and determined to stick to the time constraints you defined, all you can really do is think of your 6 hours on low as 5-7 hours on low --in ...


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I still haven't made any cracker but I was in a similar situation with my sourdough, the cooking phase wasn't right and the result was rock hard on the surface . Again, since I haven't tried your recipe or made similar baked goods, this can even possibly be something counterproductive, but try to cook things in the oven with a container ( made of metal or ...


0

Perhaps lower heat and cook longer...or even use a dehydrator? If you have no dehydrator, try your lowest oven setting until dry and set...might take a few hours. You could also try increasing banana (to help it stick together) and reducing or eliminating the butter, which might inhibit drying.


0

Tip from Science: There isn't any doubt that vacuum is the best way to go. What could pass less heat from one side to the other than 'nothing' material. Air is good but not nearly as good as a vacuum. However, a true vacuum creates a lot of pressure on the mug walls because of 15lbs/sq inch of air pressing on the walls of the mug with no resistance from the ...


4

Go for 8 hours on Low. 2 more hours on low shouldn't hurt anything too much, for many slow-cooking extra cook-time can actually be beneficial. More cook-time usually means a more tender finished product. Whatcha cookin? That would help us answer this question better.


2

Tough cuts become tender because collagen breaks down over time in the presence of heat and moisture, which usually takes several hours. When cooking that long the meat heats up to be the same as the oven temperature, so in this case internal meat temperature = oven temperature.



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