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1

If you can't adjust or diffuse the heat enough, consider a separate electric cooktop. Single place electric burners are very common, inexpensive, and you may be able to adjust the heat output better. Look into induction cooktops when you do, you might be surprised at the control you have over your cooking with one of these.


3

Since this is a new gas range, I'd suggest that you have the supplier confirm that the correct size orifices are installed. Generally speaking, most gas ranges come with two or more sets of orifices: Propane and Natural gas. Not only do those have different BTU ratings per unit of gas, they also normally run different pressures. In North America, natural ...


1

I'm surprised nobody has suggested turning up the heat until the burner is almost off. Just between being off and being at full is the smallest flame possible.


1

Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break ...


3

This is a common problem for single cooks who cook in small portions. A burner produces a constant energy output, which will bring different amounts of food to different end temperatures. You can consider cooking a larger batch of food at once. This will give you a simmer and lots of tasty leftovers. Many liquid foods such as soups also freeze well. Of ...


10

1. Simmer/Burner Plate You can use a simmer plate or something to diffuse the heat. For example: http://www.thekitchn.com/good-tool-burner-plate-for-low-107122 Google: Heat Diffuser From the first link, a suggestion is to use a cast iron skillet as a heat diffuser. That should work in a pinch. 2. Adjust the Flame Alternatively, some stoves allow you ...


3

I have always used room temperature water, & have never had any problem. Generally I take the water from the Brtia filter sitting on my countertop.


3

The time and temperature can vary widely based on a lot of different factors. What's important is the final temperature. Chicken breast is safe and largely considered palatable at 165F (74C). Use an instant read thermometer in the thickest part of the breast. Just to give you an idea where to start, here are several recipes for Stuffed Chicken Breasts from ...


0

The soup I ate tonight was too hot until it cooled down to 140 degrees. At 145 degrees I had to blow on it first.


0

I assume you mean what temperature would your food be after microwaving it? It depends on the food. A microwave isn't getting hot like an oven does. It shoots microwaves at your food which causes the food to heat up a certain amount. The amount it heats up depends a lot on its water content, mass, etc. A microwave is going to transmit a fixed amount ...


8

It is impossible to convert Microwaves into Celsius or Fahrenheit. Temperature(Celsius): Temperature is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy of the molecules of a system. Heat is commonly expressed in either of two units: the calorie, an older metric unit, and the British thermal unit (Btu), an English unit commonly used in the United ...


1

Without question low and slow is best for pork shoulder roasts. Roasting the meat to at least an internal temp of 180 degrees is critical. Once this temp is reached, remove the roast from the oven, cover loosely with foil and rest until the in the internal temp reaches at least 190 degrees. Anyone that suggests a temp of lower than 190 degrees is not a ...


4

There is a HeterMeter project on github that will do exactly what you want. It contains a webserver that allows you to access it from computers and mobile devices via a web browser anywhere on your local wifi (or even the Internet if you configure your home router to allow it). It can be built to use either a thermocouple or thermistor as the pit probe. ...


1

I had an oven guy here not too long ago to test this exact thing with my oven. Perhaps this being Silicon Valley, he was was an extremely knowledgeable and highly technical fellow. I don't know the exact meter he was using, but I believe he used a thermocouple probe that had a special attachment to wrap around the rack at the dead center of the oven. He ...


6

Not sure about the acceptable fluctuations but probably the most common sort of sensor for those high termperatures is a thermocouple. There are three easy ways to get the data to a PC that come to mind: Logging the data using a temperature datalogger with a thermocouple interface so it can later be downloaded to a PC. That might be good if getting your ...


7

There's nothing wrong with your conversions, they were fine. What you may not have considered is: Convection versus non-convection ovens. When you see a recipe in F it's most likely from the US, and in the US convection ovens are rare. Convection ovens cook with more intensity than non-convection ovens as the fan blows hot air, so when using a recipe for a ...


10

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


1

For me the secret to resting is all about core temperature. Let's take a beef fillet steak for an example. There is no way the meat can dry out under 55 C due to the structure of the fibers and you can also not overcook a steak when the core temperature does not rise above 50/55 C according to personal tastes. For this reason I let steaks rest in an oven ...


7

When I make Bolognese I take the mince carefully from the packet in its cuboid shape and place it straight onto a smoking cast iron and then flip it after a few short minutes, like a rare steak. The ratio of caramelised to pink meat it the same as in a good steak. When it comes to the liquid cooking stage, the cuboid can be broken up to give a good mix ...


2

Classically speaking the meat should be browned in batches so it doesn't stew. You don't want all those juices to run out of the meat. That is how you end up with dry meat in the end product.


1

I always brown the minced meat first, with chopped onions, olive oil, oregano, basil, chopped parsley and grounded pepper.. I let that simmer until there the entire meat is brown (as kids we used to eat some of that right away).. Then I add carrot stripes and cinnamon sticks.. Adding sieved tomatoes, I let the bolognese simmer for about 1 and a half to 2 ...


1

The simplest way is to use higher heat. Put the meat alone on high heat, and stir it now and then until ready. If you want to cook the vegetables for a very long time, it might make sense to wait until the last 15 minutes or so before adding the meat. If you are not cooking the sauce in the same pan as the one in which you browned the meat, it makes ...


10

Kenji at Serous Eats pondered exactly this question at length. (emphasis mine) And now we get to the most crucial phase of the process: the long cook. If you take a quick look back at that passage from Cook's Illustrated, they do make one good point: browning meat toughens it far more than simply simmering it. But we also know that browning adds flavor, ...


3

When I brown mince I start with the mince alone, get it nice and brown till all the fat is released. Then I pour off the majority of the fat, I can only afford the cheap stuff so there is a lot possibly a cup full. Then I throw my onions and garlic in till tender, then add the rest. By the sounds of it, what you are doing is essentially boiling your mince ...



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