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33

I like my chocolate chip cookies chewy too and I do it all the time. Here is what I do: Flour: I use a higher gluten flour instead of AP, such as Bread flour. Eggs: An additional egg yolk will help Sugar: A bigger Brown Sugar to Sugar ratio helps but not vital if you do not have brown sugar at hand. Butter: Butter should be melted. I think this is the key ...


21

There are a variety of factors at work here: Freezing foods "improperly" (i.e. not flash-frozen, not vacuum-sealed) causes ice crystals to form within the food, damaging the molecular structures. This is what causes many frozen leftovers to become "mushy" or change in texture. Again due to the formation of ice and the movement of water when the food is ...


17

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


14

Rice is mostly made of starch. Starch is, in itself, a molecule made up of glucose components attached to each other. There are two types of starch: Amylose - it is a long straight chain of glucose - and amylopectin, which has a branchy and fuzzy structure. When you cook a rice which is rich in amylose, the grains stay separate. When you cook rice which is ...


13

This is the recipe for chocolate chip cookies For more details check out the Jan/Feb 96 edition of Cooks Illustrated. 2 c. all-purpose flour plus two tablespoons more ½ t baking soda ½ t salt 1½ sticks Butter (melted and this is key! also this is a bit less than typical) ½ c granulated sugar 1 c ...


11

There are several factors that make bread be "holey". First of all we must understand that those big holes are created by "balloons" of gluten filled with CO2 and alcohol made by yeasts. Those balloons can grow in 2 ways Yeast cells close to the balloon make CO2 or alcohol, and it's "poured" into the balloon, and it grows. The wall between 2 balloons gets ...


10

Try heating a couple table spoons of butter with some flour in a pot for a couple of minutes stirring with a wooden spoon then add enough hot milk to make the mixture smooth. Melting the grated cheese in flour prevents the oils from separating and the proteins from curdling. (edit) If you want to search for a recipe, a Béchamel sauce with grated cheese ...


10

Most likely, they are using a softer tofu than you. For whatever reason, the US is infatuated with unusually firm tofu, and supermarkets emphasize the "extra firm" varieties. In Asia, especially Japan and Korea, but even in China, most applications call for a softer, more custard-like tofu. If it's soft inside, when you deep fry the tofu, it should stay ...


9

You are correct that the milk is heated to denature the albumin so that it becomes part of the structure of the yogurt instead of washing out in the whey. When distributed through the yogurt properly this protein will not cause the clumping problems you are seeing. You shouldn't expect to make ricotta from yogurt whey- even if the milk wasn't boiled it just ...


9

There are many factors in play such as the type of sugars, amount of eggs or other sources of hydration, amount and type of leavening and so forth, but as an overall generalization: Melting the butter will lead to chewier cookies Creaming colder/room temperature butter with sugar will lead to cookies with a higher, more cake like texture. Refrigerating the ...


8

The key to this is really high heat and pan-fry in a single layer, very quickly. The goal is to get that nice brown caramelized surface and barely cook the interior and then get it out of the pan before it starts to seep water. Also, wait to season with salt until it comes out of the pan so it doesn't draw out the water prematurely.


7

More fat generally makes softer cookies. For a great desciption of how the fat / sugar / flour ratio affects the texture of cookies etc. check out Michael Ruhlman's "Ratio" cookbook.


7

In addition to what everyone else has said (increase fat...), make sure you let the dough rest (in the fridge or freezer) for at least 20 minutes before baking.


7

For Potato Jenga you are going to want to use a French Fry slicer like this one from Amazon. The larger slicing grate will produce potato of about the right square size. You will want to exclude the edges and end pieces. Some additional tips: several hours to a day before you are going to serve them slice and blanch the potatoes in sweet water (boil ...


7

I was unable to find information that might tell what happened to your dish, but found some extremely interesting and detailed sources of information on collagen and gelatin which I think are worth sharing. I did find that the pH is unlikely to be the major contributing factor, as there are both acid and alkaline processes for gelatin formation--see the ...


7

Browning ingredients (both meat and vegetables including the aromatics) before doing a braise or stew (which is what slow cookers do) helps develop depth of flavor, through the Maillard reaction where proteins and carbohydrates react together to create a myriad of flavorful compounds. Vegetables that are high in sugar, such as onions or leeks, and even ...


6

Professional charcutier here. We usually only make beef sausage from grass fed beef, which means our ground beef is very lean. Depending on the recipe, we have various tricks for improving the texture: We add beef fat if available to add richness, or even pork fat if we don't have enough beef fat. For a 5lb batch of ground beef for hamburgers, we'll add ...


6

First, it is the ingredients. For example, shortbread cookies don't have liquid, while other types do have liquid. This makes them quite different. Also, there might be ingredients you didn't pay much attention to (mono- and diglycerides, for example, which might have been present at the end as an E number only), but they still can change the mouthfeel a ...


6

Expanded from the comments... Use properly salted water when cooking the pasta. Slightly undercook the pasta a little bit; the pasta will continue to cook as you prepare the salad. Do not rinse the pasta. Mix the ingredients while the pasta are hot; they will absorb more flavour; I would try to season the pasta before adding oil; since oil will tend to ...


5

There is the good way and the cheap way. The good way is fondue. Acid and / or alcohol are used to cut up the cheese proteins so it isn't stringy and the cheese is heated gently to not break the emulsion. You can look up a recipe. <napoleonDynamite>There are, like, an infinity of them.</napoleonDynamite> The cheap way is processed cheese product. ...


5

Do you ever deep fry it, or are you always doing a pan-fry/shallow fry? Most of the tofu I see at Thai restaurants is deep fried, which yields the texture I think you are talking about. You may or may not be willing to deep fry at home, but I think if you do you'll get the result you are looking for.


5

Edit: If cooking longer softens the potatoes, then this isn't what's happening. In that case, well, you just need to cook longer. The main variable is probably temperature (maybe the pot isn't actually all hot for all 30-45 minutes), followed by variations in cut size and in the firmness of the original potatoes. But the rest could apply to some readers too! ...


5

Okay, I undeleted my OP to this question (to be honest, not sure how similar the two are...., never checked that closely). The most important thing to watch for in terms of the 'silkiness' would be the mixing and ingredient temp. When all ingredients are at room temp, they homogonize much quicker, and require far less mixing, therefore less air is ...


5

The main factor in the openness of the crumb is hydration. A higher hydration dough will generally have a more open crumb with larger, more uneven holes. A lower hydration dough results in a denser loaf, with smaller holes. As well as hydration, fermentation time also plays a role. Usually these go together; a low hydration dough like a normal white ...


5

This, I confess, is just a guess—I'd suggest adding some pectin. Pectin is a thickener that occurs naturally in fruit, but its likely absent entirely in the fruit juice you've been using. However, it's probably present in the fruit purée used in the commercial products. Pectin is, for example, the primary (if not only) jelling agent in jam, jelly, and ...


5

If you're simmering it in a decent amount of liquid for a while, like curry, the slimy stuff (mucilage) will all go out into the curry and end up just thickening it. The okra itself won't be slimy. This is one of the traditional ways to thicken gumbo! Even just stewed okra, with a decent amount of tomatoey goop, usually isn't very slimy.


5

There seem to be two general expectations for the marinade here: (1) it would tenderize the steak, and (2) it would result in more flavor. The first of these is basically a culinary myth, and the second was probably undermined by what you did to the second (unmarinated) steak. It's important to be clear about what marinades do and don't do. Marinades ...


5

Yup, tomatoes can most definitely be a bit grainy. It's not a hard graininess like sand, but a softer graininess. The best comparisons that come to mind are hydrated but uncooked cornmeal or slightly wet breadcrumbs. Instead of being juicy and smooth (whether firm or soft), you'll notice a bit of small texture. It'll probably also be less juicy, and the ...


4

There are a number of things that effect the resulting product when cooking rice. It comes down to two factors. The length of the grain and the way it is prepared. The shorter the grain, the more starch is released. A short grain rice, will tend to clump together as their will be a lot of starch released to the surface and all around it. Longer grains will ...



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