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To make smoothie thicker, you need to lower the content of liquid in it. Liquids obtained in a smoothie come either from the fruit and vegetables and also from the milk or other liquids that you pour in it. From my experience if you put a handful of sunflower seeds into your recipes, it will make the texture thicker. But not everybody will like the taste (...


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My favorite smoothie thickener is chia seed. A tablespoon will thicken a blender of smoothie into pudding. According to the internet it is also a low FODMAP food. It is a small, black seed which will change the texture a bit. With raspberry or strawberry or vanilla they are lost among the other seeds. It has the added benefit of being neutrally flavored ...


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I have a feeling Glucomanan (konjac root) would work well for you. It's fairly easy to source online and in some stores, and is super simple to use in smoothies. You add 1/4-1/2 tsp of the powder per cup or so of liquid and blend in high until it starts to make a glug-glug sound and leave to rest for a minute. At this point you can drink it, or blend again ...


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What happens if you simply adjust the solid: liquid ratio? I.E use a bit less milk? I would also perhaps suggest using more banana.


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There are several factors, but the texture of meatloaf primarily depends on the ratio of binder, filler and meat. In this case, your binder is the egg. Specifically, the protein in the egg white helps hold the meat proteins together. The filler is the mixture of milk and oats. I've heard that toasted panko is more effective at absorbing milk, and also ...


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Your first option are thickeners. I won't be counting them all off my fingers, see http://blog.khymos.org/recipe-collection/ and choose the ones which fit your dietary restrictions. For example, gelatine will work, and so will starch. You'd need to cook your smoothie and let it cool for the starch, but you could alternatively prepare a thickish starch ...


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Honestly, all three of those will crisp up very quickly, and just about any ratio will produce a crispy end product. The blend may be for textural reasons; potato starch is typically very fine and produces a tempura-like shell, while rice flour can have little bits of individual rice grains which produces a "chunkier" texture. I probably wouldn't try to use ...



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