Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

That is wax, it's done to help keep the moisture in the root. Turnips are also. You know it's getting along when it gets soft and spongy or when the skin starts to wrinkle, same with turnips, beets, parsnips, carrots....You pretty much can tell whether they are good or not in exactly the same ways. Are the firm and crisp or soft, flabby and spongy?


3

I would suggest from the information you've provided so far, that the most likely cause is that you've overcooked it. There are a couple reasons that might have happened. Pan What pan you choose matters here. If you don't have a powerful stove (ideally gas for stir frying; or induction with the right sort of wok adapter), then a flat stainless skillet is ...


3

Perhaps it's because you used grass-fed instead of corn-fed beef. Grass-fed beef tends to be more chewy and flank steaks aren't exactly the most tender of cuts when stir-fried. It also seems that the slices may have been in the pan/wok a tad too long, especially when they aren't particularly thick. You could try using a fruit-based marinade that includes ...


1

I make a homemade enchilada sauce that calls for 4TB of chili powder for 2C of chicken stock. I make my own chili powder by grinding dried chilis in a coffee grinder that I use for spices. I make sure that the powder is finely ground. To make sure the final product is not grainy, I cook the sauce for at least 25-30 minutes at a bare simmer, whisking every ...


3

The secret to cooking beans is to not add the sauce ingredients, especially the molasses, until the beans are totally cooked. Once the molasses is added the beans seem to no longer cook.


0

There is no short or easy answer to this. In short, the main factors are: The right flour and balance between water and flour - depends greatly on flour quality. The right kneading. The right handling of the wet dough. The right baking. You can read a detailed description of my efforts here (including pictures and videos): ...



Top 50 recent answers are included