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16

Another thickener that is readily available is gelatin. This has the added advantage that its free of carbohydrate (if you are avoiding that).


15

Have you tried straining the salsa? Put it in a coffee filter or in some cheesecloth in a sieve sitting over a bowl. Let drain until the salsa's the texture you want.


14

Consider the use of gums, which are essentially thickening agents. Xanthan gum, a bacterial byproduct, can be used to thicken sauces. Here is an example of using xanthan + [pectin] (a plant sugar gelling agent) to thicken a vegan demi-glace. A traditional demi-glace has gelatin from the breakdown of collagen (from animal bones), which is how it achieves a ...


13

As they cool, many proteins go from long, flexible and un-entangled to short, rigid, and entangled. For all of those, the basic thickening is due to protein structure. The proteins in question are puddings - albumin (egg) (Note: egg is complicated, and can be made to entangle at many temperatures, e.g. souffles, meringues) white sauces, gravy - gluten ...


13

Tapioca Starch - Add at the very end of cooking, it works quickly and has a pretty neutral flavour. You don't it to spend much/any time over heat. If you can't find it in your typical grocery store, you should be able to find in a typical Asian grocery store/aisle. I use this often when I have Celiac friends over. Arrrowroot powder - More stable than other ...


12

I don't see any starch on the list. Starch is generally how you thicken stocks and sauces. Corn starch is probably the most common and the easiest to find, and you should see results with no more than a tablespoon. Just be sure to add it while the soup isn't too hot and stir very thoroughly, otherwise you'll end up with lumps. A more reliable approach is ...


12

Compared to corn starch, arrowroot: Results in a clearer, shinier texture; Survives the freezing process much better; and Works better in acidic liquids (certain sauces, soups, etc.) Where it doesn't work so well is in many fruit pies and some other baked goods (because it tends to break down under high heat), and in dairy dishes (you'll end up with a ...


12

One thing you can do is dry off much of the water by slow-roasting the tomatoes in the oven first, similar to what I do in this risotto. I think you will get a more complex flavor than if you boil the heck out of them in a pot to reduce. I was also going to suggest pureeing them and then hanging them in a cheesecloth bag to drain the water, but you'll lose ...


11

First, start your Thai coconut curry sauce in a separate pot (i.e. the coconut milk and later the seasonings; no meat , no vegetables, etc.). Make sure to shake the can of coconut milk before opening to ensure it is not separated. Add 1/2 the can to the pot. Bring to boil, reduce temperature and allow the mixture to reduce to almost a paste like texture. ...


11

When you open a can of coconut milk, it usually has separated, with the thick stuff at the top, and more watery business at the bottom. Don't shake or stir it! Start your curry with just the thick stuff, and then thin it as needed with the remainder. I would definitely not add a starch-based thickener. That isn't traditional in Thai curries and will ...


11

File would be style-appropriate. Fresh okra is only just now coming into season in the American south. I'm in Tennessee and most supermarkets carry fresh okra for most of the year (though it often looks quite sickly), and frozen year-round. If it's something you enjoy, you might look into growing your own, as it tastes excellent when it's fresh picked ...


10

There's a few types of salsa -- salsa fresca (aka pico de gallo, aka salsa cruda), which is "fresh salsa" and uncooked, and if made fresh, it shouldn't be too watery (unless you add to much liquid, eg, lime juice), but letting the vegetables sit after salting will start to draw out extra liquid and could become watery. For truly thick salsa, you have to ...


10

You could try using arrowroot. This is a widely available alternative to cornstarch - it is used in cookery because it doesn't turn liquids cloudy like cornstarch does. In your case, it might work better as it also has a more neutral flavour. Substitute 2 tbsps of arrowroot for 1 tbsp cornstarch, and make a slurry with cool water as you would cornstarch. ...


9

While sugar makes a liquid thicker, it is not considered a thickening agent. Sugar is a crystal. When you add it to water, what you get is a simple solution. A solution of a solid in water is always thicker than water. This happens with all kinds of everyday substances. Whenever you add a thick liquid or a solid to a thin liquid, the result is a semi-thick ...


8

If you're making a sauce that isn't supposed to curdle, and it does, you throw it out and start over.


8

None of the answers so far mention collagen -- specifically, using a stock made from roasted and cracked poultry bones. You don't have to roast the bones, but you do need to crack them -- use a large, heavy knife or cleaver (not a chinese vegetable cleaver, you'll screw up the edge) to chop the bones up into about 2" to 3" pieces (5 to 7cm). Put them in ...


8

In the accepted answer to this question, it says that you can try wringing the pumpkin purée out in cheese cloth; or in a comment, that you can let it drain in a colander.


8

You'd have to use a whole lot of gelatin to ruin the taste. My guess is that when you experienced that in the past, you were using (perhaps unknowingly) flavoured gelatin or "dessert gelatin" instead of ordinary, pure, unflavoured gelatin crystals or sheets. Erik is correct in that gelatin does not do well with tropical fruits (including mangoes), nor ...


8

Spanish hot chocolate and Italian cioccolata fiorentina both use cornstarch as a thickening agent. Both are used more for dipping or sipping (churros in the former case), however you could easily just use less cornstarch to make it more 'drinkable'. Try a teaspoon of cornstarch, mixed with a little cold water, added to the milk when you boil it. As Kate ...


8

You could use any number of methods, including: Starch Thickeners (added as a slurry) One of the simplest and most straight forward: dissolve some starch (cornstarch is common in the US; alternates include potato starch, arrowroot, or tapioca) in some water, into a smooth slurry. Add the slurry to your simmering sauce base, stirring, and let it cook ...


7

There are a number of different ways in which gelling agents are classified. Off the top of my head: Viscosity (firmness/thickness) of solution and gel forms Thermoreversible/irreversible (does it "melt"?) Hysteresis (water loss) Hydration, melting, and setting points Appearance (in particular transparency) Sensitivity to heat, cold, alcohol, and pH ...


7

SAJ14SAJ has mentioned starch, but I wouldn't add any additional -- I'd just finish the pasta in the sauce. Pull your pasta a minute or two early, let drain but do not rinse it, and add it to your sauce. The pasta will finish cooking in the sauce, absorbing some of the liquid. It will also release some of its starch into the liquid, helping to bind it. ...


7

If the restaurant or bar is using a margarita mix, they frequently contain additional syrups and stabilizing gums or starches which add body to the drinks. It could also be that the high powered blenders frequently used in bars will be better at creating a smoother and thicker texture, or a more 'emulsified' slush. If you want to try making it thicker at ...


7

The closest thing you are likely to find is a product called Wondra flour. Like idealmjöl, it is a pre-gelated wheat flour, but unlike idealmjöl it also includes some malted barley flour. One post on this forum implies they may be interchangeable.


7

You can use cooked dry beans. I use baby Lima's, canned or freshly cooked. Do not rinse away the starch after you cook them. Cream them in a blender or food processor, place them in a skillet and add some of the drippings until it reaches the consistency you like then season, simmer and strain.


6

Looking at the recipe, I would suggest you change it in the following manner: Take ground beef and add to it 1/2 cup bread crumbs and the yolk of one egg and all spices. Break beef into balls equal to the number of cups and brown in a skillet until about half cooked. Place biscuit dough in cups and add a layer of bbq sauce. Place beef inside cups, top with ...


6

You can add cornstarch to any cold liquid, like orange juice or milk. When it's properly mixed, you can add it to the warm (hot) liquid you want to thicken.


6

To me, the definitive guide to all these gelling agents is "Texture", the free e-book at khymos.org (which I know about because of this site, by the way). It says that mango is an inhibitor to the working of gelatin, so gelatin won't help as much as you might hope. Having said that, some of the example recipes do use gelatin, so it might still help enough. ...


6

The usual way is to use a thickener. Some of them require warming, but others do not. Guar or xanthan gum will work if used in the cold sauce. It is the easiest way. If you don't have them, yuo can use gelatine, but you'll have to dissolve it in warm liquid first and then add to the cold sauce, then wait to thicken. None of these will change the taste. If ...



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