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I don't know about the other two, but both xanthan and guar gum are hydrocolloids (hydrocolloids are essentially substances that gel up in the presence of water). Guar gum comes from the guar bean while xanthan gum is essentially bacteria poop. Both gums are usually used in commercial ice creams; guar gum helps prevent the formation of ice crystals while ...


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In the US, you can sometimes find something called manufacturing cream, which is over 40% fat. Still not quite UK double cream, but much closer than standard whipping cream. You'll probably need to find it in a restaurant-supply type of place; it's not something they carry at regular grocery stores.


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Try whipping it more. The more it is whipped, the thicker it gets. Use guar gum. You can find it on Amazon. It is about 8x stronger than corn starch, so you can use less. I use it in my green tea matcha frappuccinos (frozen/iced lattes - like a smoothie). What you see in stores may be butter cream frosting. Mix about 1:4 butter:confectioner's sugar.


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Based on your description, it looks like you've made the common error of assuming that equal volume is equal weight. Butter is more dense than flour so the same volume does not equal the same weight... you must convert the 1/4 cup for each product using a trustworthy site. Here's one that looks OK and includes both butter and flour. As you can see, 1/4 ...


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No, you can do something to underthicken it (make a darker roux than the recipe intended by accidentally heating for too long), and you can get lumps in it, but there is no common mistake(1) which can cause too thick a sauce. From your description, it seems like you simply used way too much flour. 120 g to the cup is a pretty common conversion factor for ...


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yes dissolve cornstarch with water then mix it. if the curry/spices flavour start to decrease, add more curry paste/curryroux. but i wonder how the the curry restaurant keep their curry thick as hell for their customer ? :/



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