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14

I render off the necessary fat over low heat, then remove the bacon strips, increase the heat, and fry using the rendered fat. When nearly done, I return the bacon to the pan to crisp it before serving. Of course, you could also just save the grease from one batch to use with the next, thereby ensuring you always have both fresh-cooked bacon and ...


9

Most beans can be soaked and cooked together with two exceptions. The beans should obviously have similar cooking times. For example I wouldn't cook chickpeas with other, harder beans because the chickpeas would be mush. Most brand do have similar cooking times so this isn't often a problem. Second, black beans shouldn't be soaked with any other beans ...


9

Salt should be put before putting the spaghetti (or any other type of pasta for that matters) in the water. For 200g spaghetti (2 people) count ~2-3 liters of water and 20-30g rock salt. You can reduce the amount of salt if the sauce you are using is already quite salty. As a note to your point 2, the salt INCREASES the boiling point of water (a process ...


7

Salt doesn't lower the boiling point of water, it elevates it. Even so, the amount of salt you add to pasta water (10g/litre is a good guide) will barely make a difference. You need to add nearly 6 times that amount of salt to a litre of water to raise its boiling point by 0.5°C. As throwing things into boiling water can result in splashing, I suggest ...


6

It depends a lot on the vegetable. For frozen peas, I add them just when the cycle finishes; fold them in and close the pot, and 3 minutes later they are steamed to perfection. For a harder vegetable, like a raw carrot, or one where you want more breakdown, like onion, add it at the beginning. You don't really want to open the rice cooker a bunch of times ...


4

You can cook diced vegetable separately and add them in the rice just before serving.


4

Stewing tough or thoroughly connective-tissued meats is, by design, something you do for a long time at pretty decent temperatures. Since your meat has already been cooked once, if anything you are going to be cooking it slightly less than what is described in whatever stew you decide on. Your food safety concern is admirable, but as long as you observe good ...


3

I'd suggest a chilli. Most people make it with ground/minced beef, but it's fantastic with chunks of 'stewing' beef. I usually use beef brisket, cut into large chunks (say 5cm) and simmer it for 3 hours before using 2 forks to pull the meat into shreds. Then bring back to the simmer for another half hour so the sauce reduces a little. I've never made it ...


2

Make shredded beef enchiladas. The cut of meat was probably better targeted for this use in the first place. Slow-cook it for 3 hours or so in a covered pot with your favorite salsa for moisture and flavor. Be sure it cooks long enough that it practically shreds itself. Also, consider throwing in an diced onion, diced green chiles, and some hot sauce or hot ...


2

I'll often do what my mom referred to as 'planned overs', and make too large of a roast for us to eat, then turn the rest into a stew or something else in the following nights. The only comment I really have is that if you like the 'fall apart tender', I find it more difficult to get the second time around. I recall that Alton Brown specifically cooked the ...


2

I guess that to all intents and purposes your meat after roasting would be in a similar condition to pieces of meat after frying off to get a good surface colour and start flavour reactions before stewing. So I can't see any reason why it should behave any differently. What you now need to do is to trim off any thick sinew, put the meat in a stewing liquid ...


1

I'm going to argue for adding the salt after a boil, but before adding the pasta ... because I have stainless steel pots. If you add salt to cold water, it won't disolve and disperse quickly. This results in the salt falling to the bottom of the pot, then slowly disolving there but not mixing. This increased concentration of salt can end up causing ...


1

A short report from the battlefield ^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H kitchen. I marinated the meat, then cooked the pieces for 2.5 hours in a dutch oven. Added potatoes, parsnip and carrots, together with some dried herbs and then cooked for another half an hour. It went really well, resulting in a very tasty stew. A side result: I took the slightly-too-runny ...


1

Rice typically takes about 20 minutes. Carrots take about 10, Peas about 3 or 4, Beans about 5. So add them at 20-t minutes, If you're a bit late, just leave the lid on and let them steam.



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