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7

For whatever reason, the brand of tinned tomatoes I used to buy regularly had somewhat bitter-tasting seeds; the flavour was definitely present in pureed soups / sauces. I used to squeeze them all out by hand, but some still made it into my precious San Marzano tomato sauces. Then I found the perfect tool for skinning and seeding larger quantities of ...


6

Octern, It's a realative thing. What you're trying to determine is: where these gas bubbles generated out of something inside liquid portion of the can? The reason that can be hard to determine is that many cans have a little air trapped in them. If the can has been agitated at all (doesn't need to be extensively), then you can get what look like bubbles ...


5

These are the factors to consider when using tomatoes in Indian cooking:- 1) Does the recipe need pureed or chunky tomatoes to contribute bulk to the gravy? >> if puree then canned is fine or even tetrapak puree. But stick to fresh tomatoes if you need to increase the gravy's volume. E.g.: Paneer Butter Masala where tomato puree is better vs. Matar Paneer ...


5

When tomatoes are used as a vegetable in a dish that does need extra water, I will often de-seed my tomatoes. For example, when I put them in an omelet. The process is simple. Just cut the tomato in half and sweep and the seeds and pulp. Use the remaining flesh as a vegetable. This technique will work with any tomato but obviously some are better suited ...


4

In the future buy real Italian tomato paste in the tube. You'll use it all up, it lasts and lasts.


4

In addition to what's already been mentioned, try salting or brining them (any kind of tomato), before draining them. That will cause them to release more water and become more concentrated in flavor. See also Keeping scrambled eggs with tomatoes from being too watery.


4

There's nothing wrong with storing unopened metal cans in the refrigerator. But it's pointless - the whole point of canning is to make the food safe to store at room temperature. Don't waste the fridge space unless you're actually trying to chill the contents of the cans. Now, if the cans are open, sure, that's a problem. You should transfer the food to a ...


3

I would imagine that cooking with tomatoes in Indian cuisine is no different than in any other cuisine: use the best product you can get. For much of the year where I live, canned tomatoes are of a consistently higher quality than those at the grocery store. Since I don't grow my own tomatoes, I always use canned in almost any dish except salads. You ...


3

I make curries quite a lot at home and am keen on a recipe book by Anjum Anand. She recommends using cheap, fresh tomatoes that are either finely chopped or blitzed in a blender. The reasoning behind this is that you are often looking for the tomatoes to form the basis of the gravy, and this shouldn't be over tomatoey. Personally, I look for the meat and the ...


3

I don't think many of us have actually seen bad canned tomatoes. It is exceedingly rare. The risk versus reward ratio to save a bit of tomato which is not very expensive just isn't worth it. Discard.


3

USDA requirements for measurements used by the Fresh Market tomato industry **Size** **Size** No Pass Pass inches inches see note #1 see note #2 Small 2 1⁄8 inches 2 9⁄32 inches Medium 2¼ inches 2 17⁄32 inches Large ...


2

As SAJ14SAJ said, there's not really a true answer here. But insofar as there's anything at all official, it's probably the sizes the USDA uses for nutrition. They're still a bit arbitrary, but hey, everything will be. large whole (3" dia): 182g medium whole (2-3/5" dia): 123g small whole (2-2/5" dia): 91g plum tomato: 62g cherry: 17g ...


2

I think all curries can be prepared with tomato puree except aloo gobi. Its color is always bright yellow but tomato puree will change its color to brown which will not look pleasant.


2

If your main concern is tomato skins floating in your curry you can fix that. Get some water up to a boil, take the tomatoes and cut out the stem flip the tomato over and make shallow cuts into the bottom, usually an X type of cut. Drop them into the boiling water for just a minute and drop them into cold water with some ice. After a minute or two they ...


2

The tomato variety used (for centuries) in most parts of Mexico for making salsa is the one called "Jitomate" the Jitomate is a (red) tomato that has an oval form and a belly button, normally smaller than round tomato. Its flavor is more intense than the round tomato, it is ideal for pico de gallo, boiled and grilled sauces. In the us you can find it in most ...


2

I've found here: http://www.biggirlssmallkitchen.com/2012/06/streamlining-tomato-halves.html great advice to take two take-out plastic containers (shape of plastic plates) fill with tomatoes - put tomatoes between them like sandwich, so they will not go out thanks to containers/plates boarders cut through


2

I am not sure why most of the comments are negative about tomato paste. It is just condensed tomato sauce. I got my recipe from my mother, who is Italian. She used tomato paste, tomato sauce and water. The sauce was delicious. She did saute the tomato paste in olive oil and added a little sugar to cut the acidity and bitterness. Tomato paste, if used ...


2

I feel for your dilemma. I never use tomato paste alone to make a sauce. Pastene canned tomatoes works much better. But I have been stuck with just one small can of tomato paste and left with the DAUNTING talk of trying to turn into an edible sauce, on it's own. I've never been able to do it. I'm also Italian and I know that we don't use tomato paste ...


2

First off, tomato paste is sometimes helpful but definitely not essential for making a tomato sauce; see this answer in another thread. In my experience, grape tomatoes tend to have a pretty high ratio of internal goo around the seeds, within what is technically called the locular cavity (who knew?) This stuff has very little in the way of structure and ...


2

By your description I would say it's taro or 芋头 (yu tao) in chinese https://www.google.ca/search?q=mu+shu&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=J862VLp1ivxSvZODoAM&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1394&bih=827#tbm=isch&q=%E8%8A%8B%E5%A4%B4&imgdii=_ It can be bought in most chinese supermarkets For more info ...


1

木薯 (pronounced mù shǔ, literally translated as wood tuber) seems to be nothing other than cassava / maniok / tapioca. Did it look like this? by Amada44, source Often only the products made by cassava starch or the starch itself is called tapioca. In Germany you can find cassava in asian grocery stores but in large "normal" grocery stores, too. I guess ...


1

Some quick things which you may or may not find in your nearby stores which can act as sweetners: Honey Jaggery Corn Syrup Some citrus fruits like oranges Berries Winter Squash like Acorn, Butternut


1

Use your can opener on both ends of the can. They will both continue to stick to the tomato paste, especially the one on the bottom because gravity's had its way. So slowly pull up and grab one edge of the top lid. Then slide it off, pressing it against the lip of the can. Everything that was attached to it will now still be in the can. Carefully discard it. ...


1

It might be there for body, but more likely for the umami kick that tomato past helps with. I bet you could leave it out with no ill effect...otherwise, try some ketchup. You could also open the small can, use what you need and put the rest in a baggy in the freezer.


1

It is possible that the tomatoes you are using are under ripe, however could I suggest another possibility, are you using an aluminium pan? Tomatoes are acidic, and they can react with the metal in an aluminium cooking pot to change the flavour in a way that might taste unpleasant or metalic. http://noshon.it/tips/tomatoes-and-aluminu/ If it is not the ...


1

From a soup/sauce perspective, the reasons you may want to remove the seeds and skin: They taste bad/different to you. You don't like the texture they add. You are trying to impress someone. I think a smoother product is nicer. If none of these bother you, don't bother. There's no reason you should't eat all of a tomato. Note To remove the skin, cut a ...


1

You can put them in boiling water for a few (about 5) minutes. Adding a pinch of salt and a little vinegar to the water can improve the effect and taste, depending on personal preference.


1

I think you are not doing yourself any favors by pre-blanching. A whole tomato is a rather durable product. It is alive, and protects itself from bacteria - they can't penetrate the skin, and if a few of them come inside, the living cells have some limited protection. It can keep for a long time at room temperature. A blanched tomato loses all its ...


1

From watching food shows and trying myself. If you cut tomatoes in slices and salt them, let them sit for 20 minutes, it will draw out the extra water. It works for me. Good luck!


1

In Morocco, this is a very common salad, it's usually made from diced cucumbers, tomato, and parsley to which a vinaigrette is added, some people add finely chopped onions. Variations include mint, and the vinaigrette is sometimes made with salt, pepper and paprika or cumin also. ...



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