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15

Tomatoes freeze well in terms of taste, but not in terms of texture. After thawing them, you should use them in soup, stews, etc. rather than eating them raw. It could be useful to remove their skins and dicing them up prior to freezing.


13

There are a number of reasons why the flavor of tomatoes changes during both the cooking and drying processes. The first is that when drying the tomatoes, farmers and processors will dust the tomatoes in fairly high levels of salt, which helps to keep harmful microbes and insects from eating into the fruit and causing rot and infections. The second is that ...


11

If you have to choose between throwing them out or freezing, go for freezing: The texture will be way different as the tomatoes will get mushy. So when you ponder uses for them, think of what you would use canned / chopped tomatoes for. This also means preparing them a bit now is advisable: removing the peels (but could still "fish" them out later), perhaps ...


6

I peel and seed the leftovers, freeze them, and use them the next time I make tomato sauce or marinara.


6

San Marzano tomatoes are generally preferred for Italian tomato sauces because they are denser, fruitier, have a slightly lower acidity, and break down well when cooked. I've made both fresh and fresh-cooked tomato sauces from the San Marzanos my mother-in-law grows, and would prefer these over just about any other tomato variety for sauce-making ...


5

Yup, tomatoes can most definitely be a bit grainy. It's not a hard graininess like sand, but a softer graininess. The best comparisons that come to mind are hydrated but uncooked cornmeal or slightly wet breadcrumbs. Instead of being juicy and smooth (whether firm or soft), you'll notice a bit of small texture. It'll probably also be less juicy, and the ...


5

Yes, believe it or not... called a tomato slicer but they are also some times referred to as a tomato saber which is a product name originally from the commercial company Price Castle. Although I agree with Stephie and janeylicious just include the additional keyword 'commercial' with your search. Another option is that you can try the keyword 'tomato ...


5

I agree with the people who say it depends on the recipe. I'm going to expand a little on what has already been said. Tomatoes are acidic but slightly sweet, and of course add some red color and (depending on the juice) maybe some thickness to a sauce or broth. Tomatoes (and their juice) can be pretty distinctive, so you shouldn't expect any substitution ...


4

Doing a bit of Googling, it seems that there are a couple of different methods but I think the one that will please you best is to: put a piece of plastic wrap on the cut side only place it cut side down on a plate or plastic container leave it on the counter Some recommend putting it in the fridge regardless, as the cut side is prone to bacterial ...


4

In the future buy real Italian tomato paste in the tube. You'll use it all up, it lasts and lasts.


3

I think your best option may be to vacuum seal the leftover tomato and refrigerate it. I think everyone has run across the dilemma of what to do with the leftover piece and, while it doesn't happen often, it does happen. (For me, it usually happens when I make a sandwich for lunch and only use a slice or two.) Being frustrated so many times at having saved ...


3

The flavor is usually more intense. If the tomatoes are picked at their perfect peak ripeness and put out to be sun dried, the flavor is indeed more intense. Also what can happen is that they are packed in olive oil that may have some herbs or seasonings like garlic or basil or just the oil, what kind of olive oil and where is it from may cause it to taste ...


3

Texture is the main reason, but if you're going to be blending the sauce, there can be off-flavors from cracking open the seeds. Even if you don't blend it, they can be these slippery little things that I never much liked growing up. To reduce the amount of waste, you can : cook the sauce, then put it through a food mill to strip out the seeds and skins, ...


3

A tomato slicer! If you're looking to buy one, you may want to add 'commercial' onto a search. This is what I use at my restaurant: http://vollrath.com/ProductFamily/Food-Preparation-Equipment/Redco-Tomato-Pro.htm


3

If Tomatoes aren't cooking quickly. What i do is heat enough oil to high temp and add finely chopped tomatoes and let them cook in oil. Do not add water. Tomatoes have natural water in it. keep stirring till they break down and dissolve. Let all of its water nearly evaporate. Once oil starts separating from tomatoes that means its done.


3

If I want to top a pizza with tomatoes, I generally only add them in the last two minutes of baking. The texture retains some character and they get warm to hot in that amount of time. Basically I just take the pizza out a minute or two before I expect the pizza to be fully cooked, top the pizza with sliced or chopped tomatoes, and stick it back in briefly. ...


3

Probably. Depends on your sauce; some sauces do not tolerate freezing (e.g., they "break"). The fact that your tomatoes were frozen at one point doesn't matter. Mostly warnings about not re-freezing foods are due to quality loss. For example, each time you freeze a vegetable, it will turn closer to mush. Safety warnings are primarily about quick thawing ...


2

Passata is crushed tomato. Tomato paste is a concentrate of tomato produced by cooking for a long time, removing seeds and skin, and cooking further. They are different products that are going to produce different results, both flavor-wise and in terms of texture. If I were you, I would not add extra water at all, if you are going to use the Passata. I ...


2

Your best bet is to oven dry your tomatoes a bit. This will remove some of the moisture which will mean no puddles on your pizza and more intense tomato flavor. Slice your tomatoes as you would like them, then put them on a baking sheet. Bake them on the lowest possible temperature, opening the oven door every 10 minutes to let the moisture out. How long to ...


2

Like JasonTrue, I add tomato slices at the very end, but generally I broil the tomatoes for the last two minutes in order to zap out moisture quickly. This also works for premade pizzas ordered in.


2

The tomato variety used (for centuries) in most parts of Mexico for making salsa is the one called "Jitomate" the Jitomate is a (red) tomato that has an oval form and a belly button, normally smaller than round tomato. Its flavor is more intense than the round tomato, it is ideal for pico de gallo, boiled and grilled sauces. In the us you can find it in most ...


2

I've found the following to make tomato sauces bitter: Tomato seeds Underripe tomatoes Burnt garlic Usually, adding sweetness helps somewhat, although letting the garlic get too brown, let alone burn it, can hardly be corrected for. Some things I've found to help: Extra carrot Brown sugar


2

This is a really old post, so you might nit even see my answer, but to go off what eatstatic said, Ive seen recipes online that say 1 cup water : 3/4 cup tomato paste. Eatstatic just did it the other way around, 1 cup tomato paste : 1 1/3 cup water. These recipes almost always start with sautéing onions and garlic in olive oil, and adding an optional cup of ...


2

I have experimented much and have found that using a 12 ounce can of tomato paste results in an acidic quality to the sauce, which is undesirable(at least when cooking in standard size pot). The following combination results in a good sauce: two 14.5 ounce cans of crushed tomatoes, one 6-ounce can of tomato paste, 1 heaping teaspoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon ...


2

By your description I would say it's taro or 芋头 (yu tao) in chinese https://www.google.ca/search?q=mu+shu&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=J862VLp1ivxSvZODoAM&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1394&bih=827#tbm=isch&q=%E8%8A%8B%E5%A4%B4&imgdii=_ It can be bought in most chinese supermarkets For more info ...


2

Red peppers are a great substitute for tomatoes. "Ajvar" is a red pepper paste (originally from Serbia), and it works well, e.g. as a pizza sauce. Or you can easily blend or juice the peppers yourself.


2

I definitely think you should cook it down. I sometimes use canned whole tomatoes to make sauce by slicing them open and letting the liquid out, and combining that with the liquid from the can and whatever else (e.g, a bit of white wine). I roast the tomato solids under a broiler with some sweet onion and garlic (starting the onion 5-10 minutes before ...


1

Mealy tomatoes are good candidates for sauce. They tend to be of the meatier, less juicy varieties like Roma and pear tomatoes. Beafsteak and brandywine varieties and hybrids generally don't get mealy, they just started getting leaky, and making a mess. Bunch tomatoes like Grape and Cherry tomatoes usually just get moldy and shrivel up.


1

Use your can opener on both ends of the can. They will both continue to stick to the tomato paste, especially the one on the bottom because gravity's had its way. So slowly pull up and grab one edge of the top lid. Then slide it off, pressing it against the lip of the can. Everything that was attached to it will now still be in the can. Carefully discard it. ...


1

It might be there for body, but more likely for the umami kick that tomato past helps with. I bet you could leave it out with no ill effect...otherwise, try some ketchup. You could also open the small can, use what you need and put the rest in a baggy in the freezer.



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