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37

You need a sharper knife. With a dull knife, you'll have trouble getting through the skin, and end up tearing and smashing, releasing a lot of juice. With a sharp knife, you'll get through the skin cleanly and leave the tomatoes much more intact.


23

It's not a knock-off, per se—but this particular brand has never been imported from Italy. "San Marzano" is a variety of plum tomato, as well as a protected designation of origin for those tomatoes grown in a specific region and in a traditional way. There is no single "San Marzano" brand or trademark owned by a particular company, and the name is not ...


15

Although a sharp or serrated knife are the best solution, there's also a trick that you can use when you're working with less than ideal knives (ie, in someone else's kitchen). Use the tip of the knife to stab the tomato at the spacing that you'll be cutting it. Slice at each of the stab marks If dicing, place a couple of slices on the board, and then ...


10

When you can foods, even in a mass production setting, you're pouring near boiling contents into the cans. So heating it in your soup is no different than having used those tomatoes in the soup. If it wasn't food safe it wouldn't be used for canning. It would do no more harm to eat the soup than it would be to eat the tomatoes out of that can. Addition: ...


10

In a sense, yes, those are knock-offs. They may be grown in the US from San Marzano seeds. For comparison, here is the label from tomatoes grown in the US from San Marzano seeds, produced by the same company: From Cooks Illustrated: Until I wrote this answer, I was under the impression that the San Marzano brand in my picture were actual ...


7

It doesn't do anything, it's your second suggestion. The feeling of "right/wrong" and "like/dislike" is highly correlated with familiarity. This is proven not only by psychometry, but even physiologically, with fMRI scans. People like most whatever they are familiar with, up to the point that unfamiliar things seem wrong. This applies not only to bay ...


6

Buy "hot house" tomatoes, particularly off-season. You'll be good to go.


6

My favored way is a very sharp cooks knife. Others have said serrated knifes. I also do that if my cooks knife needs sharpening (sometimes I neglect it). Note: there are general use serrated knives, often used to slice bread. Also on the market are serrated knives specifically made for tomatoes. I think the serrations purpose-built for tomatoes are ...


6

We buy large cans at home just like you do. We prevent it from spoiling by freezing it. Stored in the freezer the paste stays good for months, it's just a matter of correct storage. What we do is the following: spoon a portion into a plastic bag -> twist the bag around several times -> tie off with a tierib (we use the thingies you get in the package with ...


5

Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


5

From a production standpoint, you might actually be better off asking this question on the gardening site. In general, however, for canning purposes you'll want to select a 'determinate' variety -- they tend to have all of their fruit ripen around the same time, rather than having it be spread out across many weeks. Indeterminate tend to be better for ...


5

I agree with the people who say it depends on the recipe. I'm going to expand a little on what has already been said. Tomatoes are acidic but slightly sweet, and of course add some red color and (depending on the juice) maybe some thickness to a sauce or broth. Tomatoes (and their juice) can be pretty distinctive, so you shouldn't expect any substitution ...


5

It is unnecessary, however some people don't like the skins. They tend to curl up into tube sticks that don't chew very well and can hurt if you chew one accidentally and you have a sensitive tooth or gum disease. Peeling it very easy. Score an x at the bottom of each tomatoe and blanch. The skin will curl back and leave you with a whole but peeled tomato. ...


5

We cook down our tomatoes with skins on and then about half way through we strain the juice out to get rid of skins and seeds. Once we do that it goes back in the pot with our spices until it's reduced enough for our liking. We prefer smooth sauces.


5

Yes, I think you should peel tomatoes, but I have a thing about tomato skins. In my opinion, you should either peel them or use a food mill to weed out the skins. If they don't bother you or your guests, it's an unnecessary step. Even if the tomatoes are diced, some of the tomato skin will separate from the meat of the tomatoes and make a paper-like curl in ...


4

Besides buying cheaper, firmer and paler tomatoes as explained above, try also keeping them in the fridge before eating them. Refrigeration breaks down many of the tomato flavors.


4

You can get a decent idea just from nutrition labels. Tomatoes are the only ingredient, so pretty much all the numbers on the nutrition label are proportional to the amount of tomatoes in the can. Calories have the most granularity, so: peeled whole tomatoes: 0.21 calories/gram diced tomatoes: 0.21 calories/gram tomato sauce: 0.33 calories/gram crushed ...


3

If your goal is indeed a sauce or purée, you will want to reduce the total amount of liquid in your tomatoes, typically by reducing the sauce, i.e. boiling the liquid off. Any additional liquid simply extends the time required unless you add a liquid explicitly for taste, e.g. red wine, a dash of (balsamic) vinegar or broth. Wine for example does influence ...


3

It's nothing. Since you've already fished it out, you're done having to deal with it, just keep going. No harm will come to you or your dish.


3

Unless specified, I would assume before cored and peeled. And in general for any ingredient, unless explicitly specified: Raw, as bought in the store, before cleaning and/or preparation. It makes assembling a shopping list easier, it makes buying easier, it makes writing a recipe easier, and it makes cooking a recipe easier.


2

Take two lids off any size food storage container you find fitting. Fill one with as many grape tomatoes your heart desires. Place the second lid on top facing down. Take a serrated bread knife and cut the tomatoes in half between the lids. Mine is in fact a 13" so I can cut about 12 boxes of cherry tomatoes in half in under 2 minutes.


2

I've found the following to make tomato sauces bitter: Tomato seeds Underripe tomatoes Burnt garlic Usually, adding sweetness helps somewhat, although letting the garlic get too brown, let alone burn it, can hardly be corrected for. Some things I've found to help: Extra carrot Brown sugar


2

Red peppers are a great substitute for tomatoes. "Ajvar" is a red pepper paste (originally from Serbia), and it works well, e.g. as a pizza sauce. Or you can easily blend or juice the peppers yourself.


2

I see no reason why closed cans should have a higher risk of causing the tomatoes to become acidic. When closed the only difference is, that there is no (to very little) oxygen. This is actually what causes your products to last longer. And the United States Department of Agriculture states that canned food can be stored in the fridge once opened, so it ...


2

Passata is not the same as sauce or puree, and is an additional item to SAJ14SAJ's list. Here is a an excerpt from Wikipedia: Tomato purée is never referred to by its Italian name, passata di pomodoro, when it has been "passed" through a sieve to remove seeds and lumps. Passata is an entirely different product, its main point of difference being the ...


2

The general consensus is that for occidental-style, cooked tomato sauces - all of the sauces you mention are - you want to use the more plum-shaped, thicker-skinned types like Roma or San Marzano, NOT globe tomatoes, especially not the greenhouse grown, large, watery varieties. The more ripe, the better. Also, good quality canned product (whole peeled, or ...


2

Smell and touch your tomato. The softer it is, the riper. Also, the more it smells like a sun-ripened tomato, the riper. The smell is not only stronger, it is different from the smell of a badly ripened (but still red) tomato, or worse, previously refrigerated tomato. If you don't know how a good tomato smells, you'll have to learn it by smelling tomatoes ...


2

Though the other answers correctly state that the lid is harmless, what was dropped into the soup was the lid and additionally everything else on that lid. I had once briefly worked at a warehouse that handled, among other things, some food products. There I learned that the outside of the can is no less important than the inside. I have seen rat poison ...


2

Use a serrated knife with a long blade. Like a bread knife! When cutting, try not to apply too much pressure (i.e. press down into the berry, or use a vigorous sawing motion). That squeezes out tomato juice. Instead, let the weight of the blade do most of the work. This is why I recommend a long blade. A nice, slow draw from the heel of the knife to ...


2

While using a sharp serrated knife, place the whole tomatoe upside down on the cutting block. Cut down through the tomatoe without cutting through (I.e. Let the top of the tomato hold together). Cut as thick or thin as you want. If you want slices, then once you have cut then all then turn the tomato on its side and hold the tomato together with the top ...



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