Hot answers tagged

15

Tomatoes freeze well in terms of taste, but not in terms of texture. After thawing them, you should use them in soup, stews, etc. rather than eating them raw. It could be useful to remove their skins and dicing them up prior to freezing.


11

If you have to choose between throwing them out or freezing, go for freezing: The texture will be way different as the tomatoes will get mushy. So when you ponder uses for them, think of what you would use canned / chopped tomatoes for. This also means preparing them a bit now is advisable: removing the peels (but could still "fish" them out later), perhaps ...


10

When you can foods, even in a mass production setting, you're pouring near boiling contents into the cans. So heating it in your soup is no different than having used those tomatoes in the soup. If it wasn't food safe it wouldn't be used for canning. It would do no more harm to eat the soup than it would be to eat the tomatoes out of that can. Addition: ...


7

It doesn't do anything, it's your second suggestion. The feeling of "right/wrong" and "like/dislike" is highly correlated with familiarity. This is proven not only by psychometry, but even physiologically, with fMRI scans. People like most whatever they are familiar with, up to the point that unfamiliar things seem wrong. This applies not only to bay ...


6

Buy "hot house" tomatoes, particularly off-season. You'll be good to go.


6

San Marzano tomatoes are generally preferred for Italian tomato sauces because they are denser, fruitier, have a slightly lower acidity, and break down well when cooked. I've made both fresh and fresh-cooked tomato sauces from the San Marzanos my mother-in-law grows, and would prefer these over just about any other tomato variety for sauce-making ...


5

Yup, tomatoes can most definitely be a bit grainy. It's not a hard graininess like sand, but a softer graininess. The best comparisons that come to mind are hydrated but uncooked cornmeal or slightly wet breadcrumbs. Instead of being juicy and smooth (whether firm or soft), you'll notice a bit of small texture. It'll probably also be less juicy, and the ...


5

Yes, believe it or not... called a tomato slicer but they are also some times referred to as a tomato saber which is a product name originally from the commercial company Price Castle. Although I agree with Stephie and janeylicious just include the additional keyword 'commercial' with your search. Another option is that you can try the keyword 'tomato ...


5

I agree with the people who say it depends on the recipe. I'm going to expand a little on what has already been said. Tomatoes are acidic but slightly sweet, and of course add some red color and (depending on the juice) maybe some thickness to a sauce or broth. Tomatoes (and their juice) can be pretty distinctive, so you shouldn't expect any substitution ...


5

We cook down our tomatoes with skins on and then about half way through we strain the juice out to get rid of skins and seeds. Once we do that it goes back in the pot with our spices until it's reduced enough for our liking. We prefer smooth sauces.


5

Yes, I think you should peel tomatoes, but I have a thing about tomato skins. In my opinion, you should either peel them or use a food mill to weed out the skins. If they don't bother you or your guests, it's an unnecessary step. Even if the tomatoes are diced, some of the tomato skin will separate from the meat of the tomatoes and make a paper-like curl in ...


5

It is unnecessary, however some people don't like the skins. They tend to curl up into tube sticks that don't chew very well and can hurt if you chew one accidentally and you have a sensitive tooth or gum disease. Peeling it very easy. Score an x at the bottom of each tomatoe and blanch. The skin will curl back and leave you with a whole but peeled tomato. ...


5

From a production standpoint, you might actually be better off asking this question on the gardening site. In general, however, for canning purposes you'll want to select a 'determinate' variety -- they tend to have all of their fruit ripen around the same time, rather than having it be spread out across many weeks. Indeterminate tend to be better for ...


5

Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


4

Besides buying cheaper, firmer and paler tomatoes as explained above, try also keeping them in the fridge before eating them. Refrigeration breaks down many of the tomato flavors.


3

Probably. Depends on your sauce; some sauces do not tolerate freezing (e.g., they "break"). The fact that your tomatoes were frozen at one point doesn't matter. Mostly warnings about not re-freezing foods are due to quality loss. For example, each time you freeze a vegetable, it will turn closer to mush. Safety warnings are primarily about quick thawing ...


3

If I want to top a pizza with tomatoes, I generally only add them in the last two minutes of baking. The texture retains some character and they get warm to hot in that amount of time. Basically I just take the pizza out a minute or two before I expect the pizza to be fully cooked, top the pizza with sliced or chopped tomatoes, and stick it back in briefly. ...


3

A tomato slicer! If you're looking to buy one, you may want to add 'commercial' onto a search. This is what I use at my restaurant: http://vollrath.com/ProductFamily/Food-Preparation-Equipment/Redco-Tomato-Pro.htm


3

If Tomatoes aren't cooking quickly. What i do is heat enough oil to high temp and add finely chopped tomatoes and let them cook in oil. Do not add water. Tomatoes have natural water in it. keep stirring till they break down and dissolve. Let all of its water nearly evaporate. Once oil starts separating from tomatoes that means its done.


3

Unless specified, I would assume before cored and peeled. And in general for any ingredient, unless explicitly specified: Raw, as bought in the store, before cleaning and/or preparation. It makes assembling a shopping list easier, it makes buying easier, it makes writing a recipe easier, and it makes cooking a recipe easier.


3

It's nothing. Since you've already fished it out, you're done having to deal with it, just keep going. No harm will come to you or your dish.


3

If your goal is indeed a sauce or purée, you will want to reduce the total amount of liquid in your tomatoes, typically by reducing the sauce, i.e. boiling the liquid off. Any additional liquid simply extends the time required unless you add a liquid explicitly for taste, e.g. red wine, a dash of (balsamic) vinegar or broth. Wine for example does influence ...


2

This is a really old post, so you might nit even see my answer, but to go off what eatstatic said, Ive seen recipes online that say 1 cup water : 3/4 cup tomato paste. Eatstatic just did it the other way around, 1 cup tomato paste : 1 1/3 cup water. These recipes almost always start with sautéing onions and garlic in olive oil, and adding an optional cup of ...


2

I have experimented much and have found that using a 12 ounce can of tomato paste results in an acidic quality to the sauce, which is undesirable(at least when cooking in standard size pot). The following combination results in a good sauce: two 14.5 ounce cans of crushed tomatoes, one 6-ounce can of tomato paste, 1 heaping teaspoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon ...


2

I've found the following to make tomato sauces bitter: Tomato seeds Underripe tomatoes Burnt garlic Usually, adding sweetness helps somewhat, although letting the garlic get too brown, let alone burn it, can hardly be corrected for. Some things I've found to help: Extra carrot Brown sugar


2

(Answering as a Canadian here and assuming the terms 'purée' and 'paste' have been clarified in other answers with paste being purely tomatoes and a very thick 'paste'-like consistency...) 1 cup tomato purée = 2 tbsp tomato paste + enough water to make 1 cup total (technically an additional 14 tbsp of water)


2

Like JasonTrue, I add tomato slices at the very end, but generally I broil the tomatoes for the last two minutes in order to zap out moisture quickly. This also works for premade pizzas ordered in.


2

Your best bet is to oven dry your tomatoes a bit. This will remove some of the moisture which will mean no puddles on your pizza and more intense tomato flavor. Slice your tomatoes as you would like them, then put them on a baking sheet. Bake them on the lowest possible temperature, opening the oven door every 10 minutes to let the moisture out. How long to ...


2

Red peppers are a great substitute for tomatoes. "Ajvar" is a red pepper paste (originally from Serbia), and it works well, e.g. as a pizza sauce. Or you can easily blend or juice the peppers yourself.


2

Passata is crushed tomato. Tomato paste is a concentrate of tomato produced by cooking for a long time, removing seeds and skin, and cooking further. They are different products that are going to produce different results, both flavor-wise and in terms of texture. If I were you, I would not add extra water at all, if you are going to use the Passata. I ...



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