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Tomatoes grow on a vine. But it is possible to pick them unripe, ship them unripe (which is much easier than shipping ripe tomatoes), then gas them with ethylene at the destination. Ethylene acts as a plant hormone and causes ripening. But tomatoes ripened in storage don't taste the same as vine ripened ones. The compounds a tomato builds are dependent on ...


10

Many fruits (tomatoes being one) and vegetables are picked before they are ripe and then artificially ripened at their transport destination using artificial means like ethylene gas. This makes fruits and vegetables make it to the store and last longer there without spoiling, and is the reason we have many of our vegetables year-round. The down-side to this ...


10

White wine in tomato sauces adds: Some acidity, but tomatoes are quite acidic as well A touch of fruitiness and flavor Alcohol, which does not all cook off, which can enhance the perception of the dish due to some flavor molecules being alcohol soluble, especially in tomatoes Since you are avoiding alcohol itself, some of the options you might use are: ...


6

You may wish to seed the tomatoes, removing the gelatinous part containing the seeds, which is mostly water, and very little flavor. You want to use only the meaty, fleshy part of the tomato in a quiche. Depending on the size of your tomatoes, scooping the seeds out with a melon scoop, cutting out the seed sections, or simply squeezing out the seeds will ...


5

Another effective method (not mentioned in the link SAJ14SAJ provided) is salting. Dice the tomatoes, generously salt them and leave them in a sieve for 20 minutes or so. You probably want to squeeze off some of the juicy bits first. Flip the tomatoes half-way through the resting time. That will draw off a lot of water without pre-cooking the tomatoes (which ...


4

It's really a matter of time, and cost. You can make a great tomato sauce with fresh tomatoes, and it will beat anything you get out of a can. However, you need a whole load of very good tomatoes, and lots of time and effort to scald them, peel them, then cook them down until they thicken. It's not worth making a tomato sauce out of mediocre tomatoes, you'll ...


4

Canned tomatoes, compared to fresh, are: Cooked. As part of the canning process, they are fully cooked. Peeled. Most canned tomatoes are peeled Acidic. For safety reasons, canned tomatoes often have additional citric acid added to the can (this prevents botulism growth) Ripe. The tomatoes to be canned are often vine ripened to a more ideal ripeness ...


4

When I have very fresh and very ripe tomatoes, I don't like to cook them as their structure breaks down with heat and quickly becomes grainy. Another option in addition to others' wonderful recommendations is just to prep the tomatoes separately. Peel them by blanching and shocking them so the skin comes apart, split, and scoop out the seeds. Dice, and add ...


4

Draining some of the juice allows you to get to a thick sauce quickly. It may also reduce some of the acidity which may be why you prefer this recipe. The thickness of the pasta sauce goes hand-in-hand with the shape of the pasta you're making. Different pasta shapes can hold different amount of water (say fusilli vs spaghetti) and traditionally you boil ...


4

I usually harvest my unripe tomatoes the night before first hard frost. Anything beyond hard green, and into the yellowish/red stage goes in a cardboard box with a ripening apple. That yields me a steady supply of ripe and fairly tasty tomatoes through Thanksgiving and some years up til Christmas. Cover the box with a towel. Some of the tomatoes will go bad, ...


4

According to Harold McGee writing in the Curious Cook column of the New York times, despite widespread belief that tomato vines are poisonous, there is little actual supporting evidence that they are in fact poisonous: [T]here’s scant evidence for tomato toxicity in the medical and veterinary literature. I found just one medical case, an undocumented ...


4

This would be a really, really bad idea. The alkaloid compounds that make nightshades toxic can be toxic even at low levels, and a few of them are specifically alcohol soluble. This means that while chomping down on a tomato leaf might not hurt you, the toxins are readily extracted in alcohol, so you'd be maximizing your exposure to them by making a liqueur. ...


4

In general you need to consider the purpose of the ingredient, and what would happen to it during the cooking that it's missed. For example, there's no point stirring a spoonful of flour into a sauce after cooking, since the flour needs heat in order to thicken the sauce. In the case of the tomato paste, not much will happen to that particular ingredient ...


4

In a chili application, the recipe is going to be forgiving. You will get a little more texture from the cubed (diced) tomatoes assuming that your recipe doesn't then cook them down a considerable time; more absolute quantity of tomato flavor from the crushed simply because you have more of it. Both should give you good outcomes. Choose the one that you ...


4

Tell your friend to buy around a 450g jar of passata. This is finely crushed, sieved tomatoes. It comes plain, or most supermarkets carry versions with onions, basil etc. Tomato puree is an entirely different thing and I wouldn't go down that route. There are also various pre-made tomato sauce jars available from the likes of brands like Dolmio that have ...


4

There's nothing wrong with storing unopened metal cans in the refrigerator. But it's pointless - the whole point of canning is to make the food safe to store at room temperature. Don't waste the fridge space unless you're actually trying to chill the contents of the cans. Now, if the cans are open, sure, that's a problem. You should transfer the food to a ...


3

Jars burst either because of internal pressure or thermal shock. There are a couple things you can do to reduce the risk of bursting. use actual canning jars. Some people like to reuse regular jars that aren't as strong. This will often work fine but increases the risk of bursting. make sure the jar is hot. A cold jar into hot water or a hot jar into cold ...


3

You never can tell how much water a tomato will give off, it depends on the variety, how much water it had when it was grown, how thick you slice it, etc. You're best off hedging your bets by following @saj14saj's advice, and roasting your tomatoes beforehand. You could also part dry them in the oven over a longer period, for instance while you are at ...


3

This often happens when the tomatoes used are not fully mature. Although apparently are completely red, the parties less red lighten the sauce. Alternatively, depends on the quality of tomatoes. The Native Americans tomatoes were yellow (hence the Italian name "golden apple" = "pomo d'oro" = "pomodoro"). Through the selections have become red. But remaining ...


3

These are the factors to consider when using tomatoes in Indian cooking:- 1) Does the recipe need pureed or chunky tomatoes to contribute bulk to the gravy? >> if puree then canned is fine or even tetrapak puree. But stick to fresh tomatoes if you need to increase the gravy's volume. E.g.: Paneer Butter Masala where tomato puree is better vs. Matar Paneer ...


2

To contradict / complement the other answers: the "vine-ripened" point is mostly moot. Your regular old comercial round red tomato variety has been bred for shelf-life for roughly forever, won't develop much flavour anyway, and most of whatever is left is probably lost in (refrigerated) transportation and storage even if they were picked ripe - I haven't ...


2

In many countries, including the UK, tomatoes grown outdoors often will not ripen at all, due to a lack of sunshine at the right time. What gardeners usually do is pick the green or reddening tomatoes and leave them to ripen on a windowsill (or something similar). They may not taste as good as ones grown under glass. but they are better than ordinary ...


2

I feel for your dilemma. I never use tomato paste alone to make a sauce. Pastene canned tomatoes works much better. But I have been stuck with just one small can of tomato paste and left with the DAUNTING talk of trying to turn into an edible sauce, on it's own. I've never been able to do it. I'm also Italian and I know that we don't use tomato paste ...


2

I've found here: http://www.biggirlssmallkitchen.com/2012/06/streamlining-tomato-halves.html great advice to take two take-out plastic containers (shape of plastic plates) fill with tomatoes - put tomatoes between them like sandwich, so they will not go out thanks to containers/plates boarders cut through


2

Nutritional changes in cooking foods (including tomatoes) are not simple to answer: cooking can reduce some nutrients, and it can make other ingredients more available. Tomatoes are a case in point, as cooking has both effects. According to as study in the Journal of Food and Agriculture, as reported in Cornell Chronical, both effects happen. Vitamin C ...


2

It can make your sauce watery and almost impossible to reduce in time for dinner. What I tend to do is drain them off and reduce the remaining liquid in another saucepan while the main pasta sauce is cooking and then add in the end when it's the desired consistency. I suppose it depends on the brand but one must assume that the juice contains a significant ...


2

Especially regarding tomatoes, there can be some discrepancies on what coring means. In some cases, they mean to just scoop out the stem and the tough white bit under it, and in others they mean to remove the whole central bit with seeds. In my experience "cored" usually means just removing the stem and white bit, whereas "cored and seeded" means removing ...


2

It's worth to bother! :) Fresh tomatoes are the WOW factor in my home made pizzas, I also store it for the winter and make huge amounts in the summer. Experiment with seasoning and make sure you reduce the sauce well to avoid watery pizzas. The important thing is also to buy good fresh tomatoes, there are plenty bland ones in the market, in which case ...


2

I like using fresh tomatoes, and I just put them in the oven (with basil and thyme, and blend them with garlic) to dry them out a little while making the dough. I've never tried it with canned tomatoes, so I'm not sure if there's any difference in taste, but you can definitely make it work. As a plus, once you've blended/strained them, you can make a ...


2

Italian style likely just means Roma (plum) tomatoes. It's a marketing ploy since there are lots of different types of tomatoes in Italy and no one 'style'. Roma tomatoes (along with most other types) grown without proper plant nutrition, and limited sun can be especially bland if picked early as well. They don't have to add anything to make them bland. ...



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