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34

Folding a burrito is serious business. Get it wrong and you'll end up dumping most of the contents all over the place and look like a burrito noob. Get it right and your hands and plate will be perfectly clean, and you'll no longer be hungry. Beware: publicly flaunting these skills might lead to people wanting you to fold their burritos for them. General ...


16

Depending on where you are, the word tortilla can mean a few different things. In Mexico it refers to a flatbread made of either wheat or corn and a few other ingredients. These flatbreads tend to come in standard sizes in the United States at least, one of which might be labeled the "burrito" size. A burrito is one use for a tortilla. A burrito consists ...


15

You need to warm them up a bit. There are a number of ways to do this - 20 or 30 seconds on a griddle (or a comal is you have one), wrap a stack in foil and place in 325 oven for until warm, wrap a stack in a clean towel and steam them using a steamer, or slightly moisten a towel and wrap it around a stack and microwave them for a bit, etc etc. If you've ...


12

Authentic flour tortillas use lard. For an authentic taste, use that, or consider using shortening or butter since they are solid at room temperature like lard. You also might want to consider increasing the fat in your recipe. Fat will coat the proteins of your flour and keep the gluten network from forming so easily. I was also taught when making ...


12

No mold required! Simply heat about an inch of oil in a frying pan (less oil if you're making less shells - this is enough for about a dozen), then cook small, flat corn tortillas one at a time. Cook for about 15 seconds on each side. Once you see bubbles on the tortilla, you're all done if you like soft shells. If you like more crispy shells, go ahead ...


9

If possible, don't buy your tortillas from a modern super market, but look for a source of homemade/fresh tortillas. These can be found in many cities in the U.S. at Mexican or Latin American stores or neighboroods. Perhaps check your yellow pages for "Tortilleria" (The spanish word for "Tortilla Store"). These tortillas will also taste much better (at ...


7

Yes, you can do it without a press. Place a ball of dough between two layers of plastic wrap. Use at least twice the area of wrap that you think the final tortilla will be. Squish the ball flat with a pan, book, or your hand. Now use a rolling pin to roll the dough between the sheets of plastic. Make sure the thickness is even, and don't get it too thin or ...


6

They may be too thick. You can try placing several pieces of paper or thin cardboard into your tortilla press to get thinner tortillas. (If you aren't already using plastic or wax paper to press the tortillas, then you'll have to start, so that the paper doesn't stick to the tortilla.) Experiment with several different thicknesses until the cooking is more ...


5

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_burrito Two key technologies that made the San Francisco burrito possible are the large flour tortilla and tortilla steamers, which together increase the flexibility, stretch, and size of the resulting tortilla. The tortilla steamer saturates the gluten-heavy tortilla with moisture and heat, ...


5

A burrito is usually wrapped in a (flour) tortilla. Tortilla is just the bread; burrito, taco, fajita, etc. is how you use it/what you put in it.


5

Firstly - shop-bought "packet" bread will keep for several days because it contains a lot of preservatives. In his excellent book Bread Matters, Andrew Whitley claims that home-made sourdough breads with very long rises have better keeping properties than home-made bread made with baker's yeast and short rises. This, he claims, is because the sourdough ...


4

I've seen Alton Brown make one out of a large piece of tin foil, folded over several times and molded into a taco shape. See pictures at the bottom of this article: http://www.ourbestbites.com/2010/07/beef-tacos-plus-make-your-own-taco.html (I haven't actually tried this myself)


4

Don't cut it up before cooking, do it after cooking. This is a common issue with many Mexican style recipes Coat the fish with your spice mix, and cook as desired. When done, cut into cubes/chunks or flake onto your tortilla Usually thinner fillets work best for this style in regards to surface area exposed to spices etc Do the same for beef tortilla, ...


4

The most important and easy thing to do with any tortilla before folding it is to warm the tortilla to make it supple and not to crack. (The same is true for enchiladas and tacos.) The best warming is over a range/stove burner (open flame or electric). Just keep rotating the tortilla until it is no longer stiff. Then stuff it right away while it's still ...


4

I was always taught to cook tortillas in a dry skillet (cast iron for the best flavor) on med high-high heat until blisters form, then flip cook only until the blisters brown, then remove to a napkin lined plate and cover with another napkin (this allows their own steam to keep them moist. It sounds like you're frying your tortillas which may account for ...


4

I admit, this doesn't exactly answer your question, but to expand on slim's suggestion for flatbreads -- if you're willing to give up fridge space for this, and have a little bit of time & fuel each day for cooking, I'd recommend the recipes in the various Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day series of books. You make up the dough, let it proof, then ...


3

I use a liquid oil instead of a spray oil; you're far more likely to get hot spots with a spray, which is bad for any kind of cooking. That stuff works better as a grease than an actual cooking oil. I also tend to have pretty good success by frying the tortillas up to just a hint of golden-brown (dark brown spots is overdone) and then finishing it off (i.e. ...


3

I buy tortillas in bulk (36 to 48) at a time. I freeze them because even our family of 6 won't go through them fast enough if left in the refrigerator! I stack them with individual freezer wax paper between the tortillas (get them at warehouse stores such as costco) and then place in a plastic freezer bag or in a plastic storage container. I THAW them in ...


3

If you are freezing the tortillas yourself and don't mind putting in a little extra work in the beginning to get more convenience later, I would separate the tortillas with waxed paper (actually I use the paper sheets that are waxed on one side, intended for bakeries). What this buys you is the ability to pull out one or two tortillas as you need them. ...


3

The microwave is good for this sort of thing. Just wrap them in a towel to hold in steam and go for a couple minutes until they are soft. Or if you aren't too worried about plastic toxicity, you can put a few holes in the bag they came in and do it right in that.


3

Your best bet it to divide the dough into two batches, freezing half for later. With the half you are working with, add 1/2 recipe worth of all the other ingredients again, except the lard. This will bring you into balance. The tortillas may be somewhat tougher than you would get if they were made to specification the first time, but that will avoid ...


2

What I've seen for sale didn't look like molds -- they looked like tongs, but as JustRightMenus has pointed out, you don't need molds ... but you can get a taco mold if you want (that particular one's for baked tortillas, not fried, though).


2

Canada sells ketchup chips all the time. You could buy some there if you're close to the border. Otherwise you could buy ketchup powder and sprinkle those on regular potato chips, or buy some at ebay/amazon.


2

For masa harina- corn tortillas: In my experience, the dough should be the consistency of play-do. I often add a touch of oil while kneading the mixture (by hand). Perhaps a half teaspoon of oil. The thickness is more ideal at about a half matchstick thickness. Try using smaller balls of dough to get thinner tortillas. It should be an inch or more away from ...


2

My husband is Mexican grew up in Puebla, Mexico, the proud "mecca" of Mexican cuisine. His family puts their corn tortillas in a plastic grocery bag and microwaves them for a few seconds. Or, they warm them in a frying pan in olive oil for a few moments on each side, long enough to soften but not crisp them. I've never seen Poblano cuisine use crispy ...


2

I spread coconut oil on the tortilla (thin layer like butter) and heat them in a hot skillet for about 15 seconds per side, drop it in the enchilada sauce, stuff and roll. That way the tortilla gets pliable, the sauce gets on the tortilla, and the sauce helps it stick together and look nice and neat. I've tried many ways (enchiladas are one of my favorite ...


2

Don't use oil, tortilla's don't need oil to finish. They should have only been lightly cooked to begin with. The tortilla's need to be soft and pliable before cooking, if they have dried out, lightly steam them in the microwave in a closed container or plastic bag If they stick to the pan use a better finish cast pan (cast iron is good) and lower the heat. ...


2

White pre-cooked corn flour, water, pinch of salt and cooked in the pan is the traditional way of making and cooking arepas. However, cookery is a living and evolving subject and very much a matter of personal taste. I strongly recommend you experiment with the different flours, milk or water or half and half, cooked in the pan and in the oven and decide ...


2

According to Consumer Reports, these microwaves typically have traditional heating elements in addition to microwave heat, or they're combo convection/microwave ovens. The rack is to move food closer to the grill element, or to allow better airflow for convection models. In that case, you'd use the microwave like a small grill or convection oven rather than ...



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