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10

They're so expensive because there really isn't anything else with the same flavor, and they can't be cultivated. However, they do take some of the smaller ones to make truffle oil, which is much more reasonably priced, and more easily available.


7

Ok, first of all make sure you are getting French or Italian truffles, not Chinese or Oregon. Some people like the latter but they are quite a bit different. Black truffles do well cooked, while white truffles are usually only used shaved raw over a dish. When I use them, I like to use them in a situation where I will really be able to taste them. A few ...


5

There are two things to keep in mind while melting chocolate: Keep a low uniform heat I start off the melting process with low to medium heat. Once the chocolate fully melts, I reduce the heat to low and keep gently stirring all the while. If you allow the chocolate to cool, it separates out into non-uniform areas of heat, and the cooler pockets start ...


5

I found an answer in McGee's 'On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen'. The basic ganache is 1:1 chocolate:cream (by weight). With lots of chocolate the emulsion can come apart. In 'Keys to good cooking' McGee describes how to restore a failed ganache. You put it over a double boiler and when it reaches 33ÂșC y stir it vigorously. If that ...


4

Truffles are a very delicate ingredient that can lend a rich, nuanced flavor. I have always used them with other delicate flavors to bring out the complexity. I only use preparations that have 1-3 strong 'front' flavors if a delicate ingredient is included. I have used truffles to good effect in omelettes, cream sauces, and shaved on top of certain roasted ...


3

You can store fresh truffles in a kitchen towel and close it in a glass jar. Here (http://www.truffle-shop.com/storing-truffles) I even read that you can store the truffle with rice or eggs. The perfume will penetrate the egg shell and later you can eat truffle scrambled eggs without putting truffles on :-)


3

The process is apparently very simple: grate fresh truffle into salt using a microplane, and pulse with a food processor to blend. One source said the flavor intensified over time. I can't find a ratio either, but it looks like about 10:1 salt:truffle, maybe less. Flavor is always going to vary a bit with something natural such as truffles, but if your ...


3

You're first melting it all and mixing it together, right? You can just compute the cacao contents of the resulting mixture. For that you'll need to weigh the three batches. Say the 54% batch is 200g, the 63% batch is 150g and the 86% batch is 100g. Then you have a total of 54% * 200g + 63% * 150g + 86% * 100g = 108g + 94.5g + 86g = 288.5g of cacao out of a ...


3

I suggest you to use not the oil, but the butter. I think it's much more pleasurable. I don't know if you can find it where you live, but if you have a chance, go for it. Another possibility is that you spend the money for a small truffle and put it in oil. If you are passionate about risotto, put it into a small jar with some rice. It will get the flavor ...


3

I think the truffles that are exported are of better quality on average than what you'll find on the european market. I've never tried the american ones consciously (they're not imported to Europe as far as I know). You could also take into account that the fresher the truffles are the better the quality, so in theory it would be better to eat american ...


2

Try adding the heated cream to the chocolate away from the heat. Curdling often occurs when you add too much heat to the chocolate as it's the fats and cocoa solids in the chocolate separating that causes the issues. When I make truffles I tend to use a cheese grater to create fine chocolate shavings which melt easily when mixed with warm cream avoiding the ...


2

Uncooked? I was shocked at how unimpressive the flavor of raw shaved truffle was. It was kind of earthy, not particularly strong in flavor; in this case the truffle was probably not fresh enough. When heated and allowed to release their full flavor and aroma into food though, they are phenomenal. There's a rich, luscious taste and smell, with an almost ...


2

Truffles are a low acid food, and they grow underground, so they are at risk to have botulism spores present. Vacuum packing creates a low oxygen environment, which is what the botulism bacteria requires to grow and produce its toxin. Unless the truffles have been salted (to 5% by weight), acidified (to a pH of 4.6 or lower), or frozen (at all times ...


2

A 1:1 ratio is probably a cake frosting ratio, not a truffle ratio (although it could be for molded or even piped truffles). If you're hand rolling your truffles, though, a 1:1 ratio is going to be difficult to work with. A couple of ideas: You say you're keeping the temperature under 120 degrees, but 120 is very hot for ganache. You might want to try the ...


2

In general, truffles don't do well with prolonged cooking. You lose the delicate fragrance associated with it. White truffle is never cooked. Just garnish at the end - table side. Its fragrance is very delicate. Usually you add it at the end , or shave it on top. You need to use a mandolin or truffle slicer, thick slices aren't as good as thin pieces. ...


2

Your best bet is something that is airtight. If you're within reach of a vacuum packager, I think that putting a folded paper towel in the base of the bag and placing the truffles on top and sealing under a snug vacuum will keep them freshest the longest. Like any other fungus you don't want to expose them to much moisture. Don't wash them until your ready ...


1

13 grams to serve pasta for two is generous, but not extremely so. I think you're smart to keep the dish simple, you don't want to complicate things with extraneous flavors to muddle the taste of a star ingredient so special. Despite the very topical and interesting link provided by SAJ14SAJ, I'd be wary of sauteing the truffle in anything truffle flavored, ...


1

Basically, it is that easy. But it is a costly endeaver. I have know chefs to make it with a pure olive oil or grape seed oil. Some heat it to 220 degrees or so but I have meet some that don't. The ones that didn't made sure to pull the oxygen from the bottle with one of those wine vacuum savers. I have been told self made truffle oil will lose it ...


1

This is true, most truffle oil is not flavored with truffle, it is rather flavored with dithiapentane(an odorant). You should be able to tell by the label if it is in fact flavored by the actual truffle or dithiapentane. Not sure I would say that a sliver of truffle in the bottle would be enough to know for sure. On a side not I recently had the ...


1

Mixing chocolates for tempering is usually fine. The percentage of cocoa isn't actually what makes a difference in the tempering. The percentage of cocoa butter is what really matters. Unfortunately, that information is usually hard to find, so most tempering techniques just assume an average amount. As long as all three chocolates have been properly stored ...


1

I would expect a difference in taste between an N. American white truffle and a European one simply because they are not of the same species. Italian white truffle are "Tuber magnatum" and N. Amercian are either "Tuber oregonense" or "Tuber gibbosum" depending on region and time of harvest.


1

I melt the chocolate then allow it to cool slightly and add the cream at room temperature, stirring it in gradually, adding any alcohol for flavouring as I go - I've never had it curdle this way.



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