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6

Reusing deep frying oil is fine (up to a point - you can't refry indefinitely), and in fact the flavour often improves with use. You should be absolutely fine frying two turkeys one after the other for Thanksgiving. Have a good one!


3

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


2

The answer is going to vary greatly, depending on (1) size of bird, (2) oven roasting temperature, and (3) desired final temperature. The USDA provides helpful tables here for both stuffed and unstuffed turkeys of various sizes, roasted at what the USDA considers the minimum safe roasting temperature for turkeys (325F), arriving at what the USDA considered ...


3

Per Food Network, plan on 20 minutes per pound at 350F (177C), up to 30 minutes more for a stuffed turkey. Whatever you do, don't count on that silly pop-up thermometer thing, use a real thermometer. The thickest part of the thigh and the stuffing should register 165F (74C). Don't forget to let it rest for at least 30 minutes. For what it's worth, stuffing ...


3

There are basically three primary concerns when cooking your turkey: bacteria, spores, and toxins. Bacteria: As you point out, since your turkey eventually reaches at least 165 degrees, all the live bacteria will be killed. Spores: Some of the bacterial spores will not be killed, which means that as the meat cools, they will have a chance to grow again. ...


0

Temperature isn't the only factor in bacterial growth. According to Wikipedia: A number of wood smoke compounds act as preservatives. Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and antimicrobials, which slow bacterial growth. Other antimicrobials in wood smoke include formaldehyde, ...


1

What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


0

Kenji at Serious Eats recommends 450F for 80 minutes for a 12-14 pound bird "until an instant read thermometer inserted into the deepest part of the breast registers 150°F, and the thighs register at least 165°F". I would expect a 16 pound bird to take about 20 minutes longer (just by figuring a simple ratio). Serious Eats goes deeply into turkey ...


2

The oven in a standard 20" kitchen stove will accommodate a bird even as large as 20 lbs (9 kg). The very detailed chart here, the pertinent details of which are replicated in the chart below, establish the standard dimensions of such an oven as 18 X 16 X 14.5 inches (46 x 41 x 37 cm). In their downloadable Thanksgiving pdf, for a turkey as large as 20 ...


0

We went to a cooking school last night, both chefs recommendto let the turkey rest for 3 hrs.


3

MetroKitchens suggests that for a 17-20 lb bird, you need a roasting pan that is 16 x 13 x 3 inches (about 41 x 33 x 8cm). The oven will need to be taller than the pan, because a turkey sticks out above a roasting pan, but you can reduce that considerably by spatchcocking the bird. I'm bad at estimating visually, but I think it'd be around 6-10 inches ...


5

This looks like an excellent answer to almost exactly the same question, found here. Tuxman Nov. 26, 2013 11:01 am I am trying to get a clear answer on cooking 2-15 lbs birds in different pans/same oven. what would the cooking time, same 20 min per lb on 325 degrees? for convection oven? dae Nov. 27, 2013 12:43 pm @Tuxman: Each bird cooks ...


6

According to Handbook of Food Science, Technology, and Engineering, Volume 3, edited by Yiu H. Hui, the freezing of any meats, (particularly red meats), causes cell walls to rupture the rate of rupture is inversely proportionate to the rate freezing Since household-grade freezers are of the slower sort, owing to an effort toward energy efficiency, ...


-1

I have always brined my turkeys for anywhere from 5 to 7 days.


2

If you have a small oven spatchcocking a turkey is not possible. You simply won't have the room, even if you got a small turkey. You are better off going with a method which will work, either roasting whole or jointed. If you like carving at the table then whole's the way to go, get a smaller sized turkey, say 10-13 pounds, and put it in a covered roasting ...


4

A quarter sheet pan is tiny ... 9 x 13. You'd have problems fitting a large chicken on that. If you don't have a place to buy a half-sheet pan, look for places that do appliance repair, and get a broiler pan ... they're of a similar size, and have plenty of uses. (they just don't work for cookies) In the comments of a Serious Eats post on spatchcocked ...



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