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13

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. Apparently the middle ...


0

It would seem to me that the gravy could facilitate heating the meat without drying it out. Pour the cold gravy over the cold meat, seal all with a cover or aluminum foil. Bake at 300F (150C) until the internal temperature of the beef is at least 140F (60C) and the turkey is at least 165F (74C). That's hot enough to satisfy the New York State Food Safety ...


5

I've never thought of turkey as gamey at all, but that's just my own taste I guess. It sounds to me you want a milder bird, in which case you want to buy a cheap battery bird. Gameyness comes from exercise and diet, the blander diet and less exercise the milder (read blander) bird you get. Don't go free-range, get store-brand.


1

It's not a big no-no, but it's a small no-no. Brining is not likely to make your turkey much more flavorful (at least not in a positive way), because it has most likely already been brined. We can be sure if you post label info. Additional brining is likely to make it over salty. Butterball brand is of this type, brining will do nothing but make it saltier. ...


1

Chances are most likely that it will be just fine. I suspect the brine process will "wash away" a lot of the butter stuff. I've worked in a meat shop before and the only concern I've ever heard expressed about them is dairy allergy, so do keep that in mind. Otherwise, I would (and have) just cook them as you are used to.


0

Fat is good. Yes, you may want to separate it and so use the correct amount in whatever recipe where it is called for. I'm not sure about the white stuff. Anything remotely water soluble should have gelled with the gelatin. If you pick through it, I'm betting you will find that it is gelatin mixed with small particles of meat or stuffing residue. As a ...


4

The stuff at the top is fat, as oil floats on water (arguably one of the best things ever for a chef :)) The stuff at the bottom, is a collection of proteins, meat juices and all other sediments left in the stock after straining. Personally I'd scrape any fat from the top. Then depending on the solidity of my stock I'd either ladle out the clear stuff from ...


4

If this happened to me, I probably would not refrigerate it, since I think it would tend to create both food safety and quality issues. Basically, one should not attempt to make two extra trips through the "danger zone" of bacteria growth for 20 lbs. of food unless it's absolutely necessary. You should NOT refrigerate a large whole hot turkey; that is a ...


1

It probably would've been a good idea to rotate it partway through cooking, but too late for that now - it shouldn't take too much longer to reach 165F. When removed from the oven, it should rest on the counter for at least 30 minutes and up to a couple of hours. Since you're not going to eat it for quite a long time, you need to refrigerate it. If it ...


0

It all depends on how you wrap it for resting. I did exactly what GR suggested. I smoked it for 3.5 hours and got the internal temp to 165. Pulled and placed in an aluminum pan, covered with aluminum foil, wrapped all of that in towels and placed all of that in an ice chest. 3.5 hours later I had the best turkey I have ever eaten and it was still steamy hot. ...


9

Reusing deep frying oil is fine (up to a point - you can't refry indefinitely), and in fact the flavour often improves with use. You should be absolutely fine frying two turkeys one after the other for Thanksgiving. Have a good one!


6

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


3

The answer is going to vary greatly, depending on (1) size of bird, (2) oven roasting temperature, and (3) desired final temperature. The USDA provides helpful tables here for both stuffed and unstuffed turkeys of various sizes, roasted at what the USDA considers the minimum safe roasting temperature for turkeys (325F), arriving at what the USDA considered ...


4

Per Food Network, plan on 20 minutes per pound at 350F (177C), up to 30 minutes more for a stuffed turkey. Whatever you do, don't count on that silly pop-up thermometer thing, use a real thermometer. The thickest part of the thigh and the stuffing should register 165F (74C). Don't forget to let it rest for at least 30 minutes. For what it's worth, stuffing ...


4

There are basically three primary concerns when cooking your turkey: bacteria, spores, and toxins. Bacteria: As you point out, since your turkey eventually reaches at least 165 degrees, all the live bacteria will be killed. Spores: Some of the bacterial spores will not be killed, which means that as the meat cools, they will have a chance to grow again. ...


2

Temperature isn't the only factor in bacterial growth. According to Wikipedia: A number of wood smoke compounds act as preservatives. Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and antimicrobials, which slow bacterial growth. Other antimicrobials in wood smoke include formaldehyde, ...


1

What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


0

Kenji at Serious Eats recommends 450F for 80 minutes for a 12-14 pound bird "until an instant read thermometer inserted into the deepest part of the breast registers 150°F, and the thighs register at least 165°F". I would expect a 16 pound bird to take about 20 minutes longer (just by figuring a simple ratio). Serious Eats goes deeply into turkey ...


3

The oven in a standard 20" kitchen stove will accommodate a bird even as large as 20 lbs (9 kg). The very detailed chart here, the pertinent details of which are replicated in the chart below, establish the standard dimensions of such an oven as 18 X 16 X 14.5 inches (46 x 41 x 37 cm). In their downloadable Thanksgiving pdf, for a turkey as large as 20 ...



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