Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Your best bet for preserving quality (and safety) is to re-seal the bag, then leave them in the fridge for a bit. You want them to thaw a little, so you can pry them apart. Its safe to re-freeze after this (as the meat never entered the danger zone, indeed it probably never got above ~30°F). There will be some quality loss from the partial thaw-freeze cycle. ...


10

This is the cheapest chamber vacuum sealer that I've come across: VacMaster VP112. At $669, it's half the price of most other chamber sealers. Chamber models are far more "professional" than the stuff marketed to the home, and my understanding is that they are far more reliable. The difference between a chamber model and a home model is that you place your ...


7

I'm sorry that you're having problems with my book. I think the problem is that you're adding water to the pouch. In the recipe, step 4 asks you to: Vacuum-seal the broccoli, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a large pouch so that the florets are in a single layer. This will crush the tops a bit, but it will be much easier to seal. Sorry ...


7

The existence of gas in a vacuum-sealed environment could be a sign of microbial activity. I would assume that, since the package appears to be sealed, that the gases in it were introduced from within. I would toss that one and feel OK using the other two.


6

I've been happy with my FoodSaver, which is still working fine after at least six years of use. I mainly use it with the sealable bags, though I do have some of the canisters, and have not had any problem with those. There have been times when fluid has gotten into the machine - usually my fault through cutting the bag too small - but it's been easy enough ...


6

Sous vide not only keeps the proteins (main component) at a lower temperature, but also the spices/oils/flavorings. Heat helps release the taste and aroma of all the ingredients, and the sous vide might not be hot enough to do that. So, while it kind of kills the simplicity, you could always sautee the seasonings in oil before adding them to the sous vide ...


6

Well, I can definitely point you in the right direction towards a Cook's Illustrated test of vacuum wine keepers. Unfortunately, I don't have a membership to their website, but this free portion of the article suggests that at least some of them do in fact work better than just replacing the cork. "For our wine stopper test, we evaluated several methods of ...


5

There is absolutely real truth to improper sous vide cooking and botulism. Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic organism - it grows when there isn't oxygen - like in sous vide vacuums and canned goods. The risk is that sous vide cooks both without oxygen and at temperatures so close to the perfect repoduction rate for the organism. If you cook it a ...


5

Haven't tried it but here: http://newmountaincookery.typepad.com/a_new_mountain_cookery/2008/06/compressed-wate.html The link suggests the following technique: Vacuum seal pieces of watermelon (if you don't have one, just put it in a ziploc bag and take out as much as the air as possible) Freeze it overnight Take it out and thaw


4

Give it a sniff. If it smells ok then it probably is. I've stopped looking at sell by dates/ use by dates etc and have started using my nose. Supermarket bacon in this country is sold in plastic boxes which contain air. They usually last approx 1 week once opened. I buy my bacon from my butcher and it is just put in a plastic bag. Not had a problem so ...


4

I posed this question to Dave Arnold over at Cooking Issues, as mentioned by Peter V, and he had an answer for me. Typically, the vacuum will give more flavor penetration than a ziploc. The ziploc, however, will help flavor in the sense that it prevents the loss of volatiles. A home vacuum can help with infusion in the sense of accelerating the ...


4

I think you are going down the wrong route. Compressing fruit will intensify the flavor of the fruit and change the texture, but that's not really what you're trying to do. You want to get the fruit to absorb your alcohol and additional flavors. Vacuum can work well for this, but not compression. When you create the vacuum, all the air comes out of the ...


4

It's a slow-cooking technique involving a thermal cooker, or vacuum flask, The pot/flask and contents are heated to cooking temperature, and then sealed in the flask. The flask more or less eliminates heat loss, so the food remains at cooking temperature for a long time, and slow-cooks without continued heating. See this Wikipedia article for more info: ...


4

I think vacuum sealed raw chicken breasts in the fridge behave like not-vacuum-sealed chicken breast in the fridge because the meat is neither sterile nor less contaminated with bacteria than the non-vacuumed meat and there are surely bacteria that grow under anaerobic conditions. The meat will be safe for 2 days.


4

Believe it or not, veggies just happen to contain a lot of air. Even under vacuum this is a fairly common occurrence when cooking veggies low temp. You can add oil or other liquid to the bag, it will help, but air pockets will still likely develop. I usually add weights to the bag or bleed the air out by lifting a corner of the bag and resealing by ...


3

I've had excellent results using my vacuum flask cooker to do slow-cooked eggs. Also known as 63° eggs because they're usually sous vide cooked to 63° C. These eggs are a feature at fancy restaurants all over New York. Here's a picture of a dish from Eleven Madison Park: from my favorite English-language Japanese cooking blog, justhungry.com ...


3

You can use waxed baking paper between the steaks, It will make them easily separable but without retaining air bubbles.


3

This works by increasing the porousness of the meat inside the bag. When a vacuum is created, there is a natural tendency for matter to occupy that space. It does this by increasing the amount of space between particles, otherwise known as density. This increases the size of the microscopic holes in the meat, and thus effectively increases the surface area ...


3

It works. It's just physics. Vacuuming out air creates lower pressure inside the container. Lower pressure acts like suction, and the liquid 'rushes' into the meat much faster than during normal osmosis (marinating). It's the difference between letting guests linger on your porch and come in as they please, or grabbing each one by the arm and yanking ...


3

I would recommend adding the savory back to your dishes that sous vide cannot impart upon your food. Depending on the course, you could broil, braise, torch, add MSG, etc. Don't forget that salt = flavor, too! The method you use to bag your meats bears little difference in the amount of flavor added (see other FoodSaver vs zip-lock arguments). The ...


3

They may be safe but they are certainly not guaranteed to be safe. see How long can I store a food in the pantry, refrigerator, or freezer. Besides safety they have likely lost all consistency and won't taste well. You're propensity to prevent food waste is admirable, in this case however, it's best to bin them or better yet, compost them in a flowerpot (if ...


2

The French Culinary Institute Blog has a great (unfinished) primer on Sous Vide cooking. I would recommend it, including this link: http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-ii-low-temperature-cooking-without-a-vacuum/ which is on sous vide cooking using ziploc bags and no vacuum seal. Upshot: Go for it, the author does most of his sous vide minus ...


2

I own the VP112 and I will second the opinions here on the VP112 as a high quality machine. It's a very nice looking machine with a polished metal gleam and nice styling for the controls and display. The plastic chamber lid is heavy and reinforced and manages to not look cheap even though it is plastic. My only complaint is there was an large ugly warning ...


2

I did a bunch of research on this a while back to accompany my sous vide cooking, and just decided to use water displacement rather than a vacuum sealer because the home versions seemed to be cheap, couldn't handle liquids, and didn't create a strong vacuum while the pro versions were expensive, noisy, and huge. Maybe you should get a roommate! ;) (hoping ...


2

Truffles are a low acid food, and they grow underground, so they are at risk to have botulism spores present. Vacuum packing creates a low oxygen environment, which is what the botulism bacteria requires to grow and produce its toxin. Unless the truffles have been salted (to 5% by weight), acidified (to a pH of 4.6 or lower), or frozen (at all times ...


2

The other solution for something like meatballs, sausage, etc. is to freeze them first and then vacuum seal them once they are nice and solid. At that point they will maintain their shape during the sealing process and can be easily separated when you need to open the package and defrost some. Once you open the bag and take some out you should be able to ...


2

Marination, contrary to popular wisdom, is a surface treatment. Meats are simply not that porous; the only molecule small enough to penetrate more than a millimeter or two beneath the surface is salt, which diffuses at a rate of about 2 cm per 24 hours. So I would choose the route of convenience: do you want the marinade in the bag as you are going ...


2

I don't know that it's any less bulky, but this one is dedicated to canning Vacucanner. It does several cans at a time. Here's a review If you like DIY projects, you might be interested in this video. DIY Vacuum Canner



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible