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30

Pardon my rampant vegerianism, but the trick is not to substitue meat at all. I generally get my nutrition from other sources, without using meat substitutes at all. Unless I really feel like a certain recipe that I used to like back in my meat-eating days. Use beans, lentils and whole grains for protein. Use nuts, seeds and avocadoes (or any other fatty ...


19

White chocolate by regulation is at least 3.5% milk fat and 14% milk solids. As far as I know, the EU uses the same definition as the FDA (US). So, nothing vegan can legally be sold as "white chocolate". That said, there are a great many non-dairy white chocolate substitutes, usually made with any combination of soy milk, maltodextrin, vanilla, and ...


17

Without further qualification, if someone refers to themselves as vegetarian (in America), the general assumption is that they are lacto-ovo vegetarian. That means they don't eat animal products that require killing the animal, but eggs and dairy are fine. Gelatin comes from a dead animal (unless they start harvesting it with arthroscopic probes :), so it is ...


16

Honey is not vegan. In short, the core tenet of veganism is living without exploiting anything in the animal kingdom, and most (if not all) vegans consider taking honey from bees a form of exploitation.


16

A vegan is not going to eat your pan, just the food that was made on it. As no animals were harmed in the making of your pan (well, probably but how would you know) the pan itself wouldn't be an issue. Of course if a tiny bit of pan seasoning could go into the food, however anything else used in the preparation of the meal like cutting boards could cause a ...


13

Your question implies that cholesterol only comes from animal products. This is not correct. Cholesterol is present in many plants. Other answers and comments claim that only amounts "less than 0.5" (units omitted) of cholesterol is permitted to be listed as 0, and that "no cholesterol" is an added claim that a product is truly cholesterol free. This too ...


12

For many dishes mushrooms are a great meat replacement.


11

According to the nutritional information posted on their website Domino's uses a blend of Mozzarella, American, Cheddar, Feta, Parmesan, and Provolone Cheeses. Somebody, apparently, with similar concerns asked Domino's and received this response: excerpt from letter, emphasis added: Domino's Pizza Diced Cheese for Pizza is a specially produced cheese ...


11

You'd have to ask your vegan to be absolutely sure. If they're practical, they'll acknowledge that there might be a bit of meat fat polymerized onto the pan but they won't be actually eating it, as long as you've seasoned and cleaned well. If however they're sufficiently strict, they could conceivably say, no, it's touching an animal product, I won't eat it. ...


10

Vegetarianism is not clearly defined, but a catch-all for various dietary choices. Some vegetarians, will just simply not eat red meat, but would eat fish and poultry. Gelatin and Rennet (found in cheese) may or may not be included. I have friends who don't eat mammals, and others who won't eat anything warm-blooded. Lacto-Ovo vegetarians will eat eggs ...


10

No. The per-serving nutrition numbers are rounded and only reflect the value for a single serving. A value of 0 simply means "less than 0.5 mg" in a single serving.


9

Many vegans use nutritional yeast as a cheese substitute. There are also "vegan cheeses" that are available. However, check the ingredients closely as many fake cheeses contain casein and thus are not vegan. Some vegan cheeses will melt and some will not. I've never tried them in a sauce. Here's a link to The Vegetarian Resource Group that has more ...


9

Gelatin is not vegetarian as it is made from dead animals... any vegetarian, from ovo-lacto in the liberal end to the fruitarian on the extreme end should have an aversion. A person who eats fish and/or poultry is by no means a vegetarian, just a selective omnivore. If you need a similar product fruit pectin is a good alternative.


9

As a vegetarian, I regularly try to compensate for the lack of meat in a normally meat-containing dish using a number of methods, though I feel none can truly replace the addition of meat perfectly. In my experience, duplicating the effects of the addition of meat to a dish requires considering individually the effects the addition would have. First I'll ...


8

I have the giant box of Ener-G egg replacer sitting in my cabinet, but I've found that in most cases a flax egg will do. 1 T flax seed 3 T water Grind the flax in a coffee grinder or mortar & pestle and then mix in the water. Voila, you have one egg.


8

I've never made seitan, but just like when making bread, gluten needs water to activate. I don't know the precise amount. Oil, if anything, has the opposite effect, coating the gluten molecules and keeping them from linking up, which is why we use fat in pastries to keep them from getting tough.


8

Umami comes from natural glutamates. Two excellent vegan sources of umami are tomato paste and dried shiitake mushrooms (rehydrate then mince). Fresh shiitake aren't nearly so high in glutamates. They are available very inexpensively at Asian groceries. If you want vegetarian, but not vegan and can find a rennet-free parmesan-style cheese, they are also ...


7

Quorn based products are quite good meat substitutes. As a hardcore carnivore with a vegetarian partner I was pleasantly surprised at how edible her dishes such as stir fry and bolognese sauce are. The texture isn't at all strange, sludgy or bouncy and it's the closest thing to a meat texture (probably chicken more like) I've ever had that wasn't actually ...


7

Also see @Pulse's answer. Check out the China town for 'vegetarian food', they have all sort of fake meat from chicken to beef, from abalone to fish, all made of modified tofu fibres.


7

As some people pointed out it really depends on what you are trying to make. (and believe me it's not easier to replace the girlfriend as someone above suggested, vegan baking is so easy) You can use the egg replacer that's available at health food stores (you mix one tbsp with water, following the directions on the box for each egg). The downside of this ...


7

I really enjoy anything by Isa Chandra Moskowitz (Vegan With a Vengeance, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, Veganomicon, etc.) (website, with lots of awesome recipes: http://www.theppk.com/). I also second the Moosewood suggestion; while lots of the things in there are lacto-ovo, most things are easy to veganize, and all really good. Lastly, while it's ...


7

So yesterday I tried out the experiment. I made the naked fatty per the normal recipe, and using the gimme lean breakfast sausage. The two primary concerns I had were (a) to ensure the sausage didn't come apart during the smoking process and (b) to ensure a good amount of smokiness was imparted. With respect to (a), the heat I worried might denature the ...


7

Cooks Illustrated has an ultimate veggie burger recipe that you can adapt. Their key to umami is cremini mushrooms. I've made that recipe and it was well received. Of course, no one mistook them for real hamburgers, but the patties tasted quite good. MSG (monosodium glutamate) is to umami flavour what sugar is to sweet flavour. So if you're pro-msg, you ...


7

A gravy tastes like gravy because it has salt and glutamates, which is what yeast extract has been formulated to deliver. There is no vegan replacement. The only good way to produce glutamates in your kitchen is to sear meat. You can certainly make a veloute sauce instead of a gravy. It is made from stock and roux. Roux is a combination of fat and starch - ...


6

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) make for a delicious veggie burger. Grilled eggplant is also quite lovely.


6

There are terrific Thai pumpkin curries; the flavor profile would be garlic, ginger, lemongrass, coriander seed, cilantro, chiles, Thai basil. Here is one I did with Delicata squash that would work equally well with pumpkin: http://www.herbivoracious.com/2009/10/red-curry-delicata-squash-and-tofu-recipe.html .


6

While I go along with the best idea being to add dried mushrooms, also adding turmeric and kombu will improve the effect. Kombu enhances the effect of MSG.


6

There are a few aspects to consider, but will always boil down to "you have to ask the individual". Making a piece of cookware "safe" for a given person involves two components: Removing the contaminant in question in a manner that will prevent accidental ingestion of said contaminant. Making the item seem un-contaminated. At first glance this is similar ...


6

Salt is very much an individual thing. Luckily, you can always add more if needed. The only rule of thumb I can think of is to add a little, taste, and see if it needs more. I would also suggest sweating the vegetables before adding water, with some salt on them. Brings out the flavours better, thus needing less salt overall for flavour.


6

These are two related, but different products. Gluten is protein that is formed from two pre-cursor proteins, glutanin and gliaden, found in wheat flour in the presence of water and under enzymatic activity. It forms resilient stretchable networks which give yeast raised bread its structure. Whole wheat flour is... well... whole wheat berries, ground up. ...



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