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30

Pardon my rampant vegerianism, but the trick is not to substitue meat at all. I generally get my nutrition from other sources, without using meat substitutes at all. Unless I really feel like a certain recipe that I used to like back in my meat-eating days. Use beans, lentils and whole grains for protein. Use nuts, seeds and avocadoes (or any other fatty ...


27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


24

White chocolate by regulation is at least 3.5% milk fat and 14% milk solids. As far as I know, the EU uses the same definition as the FDA (US). So, nothing vegan can legally be sold as "white chocolate". That said, there are a great many non-dairy white chocolate substitutes, usually made with any combination of soy milk, maltodextrin, vanilla, and ...


21

Honey is not vegan. In short, the core tenet of veganism is living without exploiting anything in the animal kingdom, and most (if not all) vegans consider taking honey from bees a form of exploitation.


20

I have done no testing of this at all but I was surprised to find on this site that they recommend trying a spoon full (or cube of) sugar. Perhaps the easiest way of calming down a flaming mouth is by sucking on a sugar cube or holding a teaspoon of sugar in your mouth. This helps by absorbing the spicy oil that is coating your mouth, as well as giving ...


19

A vegan is not going to eat your pan, just the food that was made on it. As no animals were harmed in the making of your pan (well, probably but how would you know) the pan itself wouldn't be an issue. Of course if a tiny bit of pan seasoning could go into the food, however anything else used in the preparation of the meal like cutting boards could cause a ...


18

Without further qualification, if someone refers to themselves as vegetarian (in America), the general assumption is that they are lacto-ovo vegetarian. That means they don't eat animal products that require killing the animal, but eggs and dairy are fine. Gelatin comes from a dead animal (unless they start harvesting it with arthroscopic probes :), so it is ...


15

You'd have to ask your vegan to be absolutely sure. If they're practical, they'll acknowledge that there might be a bit of meat fat polymerized onto the pan but they won't be actually eating it, as long as you've seasoned and cleaned well. If however they're sufficiently strict, they could conceivably say, no, it's touching an animal product, I won't eat it. ...


14

Your question implies that cholesterol only comes from animal products. This is not correct. Cholesterol is present in many plants. Other answers and comments claim that only amounts "less than 0.5" (units omitted) of cholesterol is permitted to be listed as 0, and that "no cholesterol" is an added claim that a product is truly cholesterol free. This too ...


12

For many dishes mushrooms are a great meat replacement.


11

Many vegans use nutritional yeast as a cheese substitute. There are also "vegan cheeses" that are available. However, check the ingredients closely as many fake cheeses contain casein and thus are not vegan. Some vegan cheeses will melt and some will not. I've never tried them in a sauce. Here's a link to The Vegetarian Resource Group that has more ...


11

Avocado would be the classic answer IME (often in the form of guacamole, but not required to be in that form.) AFAIK it's the fat effectively diluting the hot pepper oil in either case, (where it's unaffected by water since it won't mix) rather than any enzyme. ...and then there's not making the food so spicy it's uncomfortable (horribly unfashionable, I ...


10

Vegetarianism is not clearly defined, but a catch-all for various dietary choices. Some vegetarians, will just simply not eat red meat, but would eat fish and poultry. Gelatin and Rennet (found in cheese) may or may not be included. I have friends who don't eat mammals, and others who won't eat anything warm-blooded. Lacto-Ovo vegetarians will eat eggs ...


10

No. The per-serving nutrition numbers are rounded and only reflect the value for a single serving. A value of 0 simply means "less than 0.5 mg" in a single serving.


10

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


9

Gelatin is not vegetarian as it is made from dead animals... any vegetarian, from ovo-lacto in the liberal end to the fruitarian on the extreme end should have an aversion. A person who eats fish and/or poultry is by no means a vegetarian, just a selective omnivore. If you need a similar product fruit pectin is a good alternative.


9

As a vegetarian, I regularly try to compensate for the lack of meat in a normally meat-containing dish using a number of methods, though I feel none can truly replace the addition of meat perfectly. In my experience, duplicating the effects of the addition of meat to a dish requires considering individually the effects the addition would have. First I'll ...


9

Flour paste. Mix flour with water and a bit of salt. Go for a thick glaze-like consistency, and use it instead of the egg. Give it at least 10 minutes to hold before frying, and try to hold the edges closed with tongs when initially frying.


9

There's a great answer to this from Vietnam, where super-spicy food is popular and dairy generally isn't. It combines many of the other suggestions into something wonderfully smooth and soothing: Avocado and coconut milk smoothie Here's one example recipe and pic. Note that in Vietnam, they love (non-vegan) condensed milk and tend to add it to everything ...


8

I have the giant box of Ener-G egg replacer sitting in my cabinet, but I've found that in most cases a flax egg will do. 1 T flax seed 3 T water Grind the flax in a coffee grinder or mortar & pestle and then mix in the water. Voila, you have one egg.


8

As some people pointed out it really depends on what you are trying to make. (and believe me it's not easier to replace the girlfriend as someone above suggested, vegan baking is so easy) You can use the egg replacer that's available at health food stores (you mix one tbsp with water, following the directions on the box for each egg). The downside of this ...


8

I've never made seitan, but just like when making bread, gluten needs water to activate. I don't know the precise amount. Oil, if anything, has the opposite effect, coating the gluten molecules and keeping them from linking up, which is why we use fat in pastries to keep them from getting tough.


8

Umami comes from natural glutamates. Two excellent vegan sources of umami are tomato paste and dried shiitake mushrooms (rehydrate then mince). Fresh shiitake aren't nearly so high in glutamates. They are available very inexpensively at Asian groceries. If you want vegetarian, but not vegan and can find a rennet-free parmesan-style cheese, they are also ...


8

There are a few aspects to consider, but will always boil down to "you have to ask the individual". Making a piece of cookware "safe" for a given person involves two components: Removing the contaminant in question in a manner that will prevent accidental ingestion of said contaminant. Making the item seem un-contaminated. At first glance this is similar ...


8

Assuming TVP is what you used... it is essentially a byproduct of the production of tofu, and as such is largely tasteless on its own. Generally, to use it you first rehydrate it with a 1:1-1.5 ratio of TVP to liquid. The liquid can be pretty much anything, from water, to broth, mustard, ketchup, liquid smoke, etc. Very similar to tofu, it will absorb the ...


8

A gravy tastes like gravy because it has salt and glutamates, which is what yeast extract has been formulated to deliver. There is no vegan replacement. The only good way to produce glutamates in your kitchen is to sear meat. You can certainly make a veloute sauce instead of a gravy. It is made from stock and roux. Roux is a combination of fat and starch - ...


8

Try a nut milk (almond comes to mind), soy milk or coconut milk. Here's a highly rated recipe for vegan "Sour Cream".


7

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas) make for a delicious veggie burger. Grilled eggplant is also quite lovely.


7

Quorn based products are quite good meat substitutes. As a hardcore carnivore with a vegetarian partner I was pleasantly surprised at how edible her dishes such as stir fry and bolognese sauce are. The texture isn't at all strange, sludgy or bouncy and it's the closest thing to a meat texture (probably chicken more like) I've ever had that wasn't actually ...


7

Also see @Pulse's answer. Check out the China town for 'vegetarian food', they have all sort of fake meat from chicken to beef, from abalone to fish, all made of modified tofu fibres.



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