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25

Let's call a spade a spade: if you're in one of many areas where people don't eat vegetables raw, it's because nightsoil or unsterilized animal manure is used to fertilize the fields. A quick rinse won't render these vegetables safe to eat, because you need to kill the pathogens. To start out, you should wash all dirt and sand off produce; for this wash ...


24

Here is why it's stupid: Sous-vide doesn't get hot enough to kill botulism spores. Low acid foods will be very dangerous. Boiling is required for a strong seal on canning jars. All pectin jellies I have seen require boiling to set. High acid recipes often call for processing in a water bath for a mere 10 minutes to seal the lids. Recipes that don't call ...


22

No, the mold on meat isn't especially bad. It won't eat your insides. But still, moldy meat is worse than moldy plants. Mold itself isn't a strong health concern. It can't cause an illness, and doesn't grow in the human stomach. There are some kinds which produce metabolic byproducts poisonous for humans, and this means that you shouldn't eat moldy food, ...


20

Typically, vegetables will lose their colour if they are over-cooked, so it's probably worthwhile cooking them for a shorter period of time. Usually steaming is a great way to preserve the nutrients and colour of vegetables, as is stir-frying rapidly. Different kinds of vegetables contain various pigments in their skins. Green vegetables contain ...


19

Iron is simply an element, so it cannot be destroyed by cooking (or generally temperature changes), as vitamins and other organic structures potentially can. Cooked spinach inevitably has a much lower water content, thus the relative density of all other components must increase. So gram for gram, it makes sense that cooked spinach should have a higher ...


18

Really, this is just to even out cooking times for vegetables that don't have a surface area to volume ratio consistent with the other things you're stir-frying. If you were to shred those green beans, as is sometimes done, you could put them in at the same time as raw, julienned carrots, and they would finish at the same time. If you put them in whole, ...


18

Cooking causes certain chemical reactions within the food being cooked, many of which produce (and consume) compounds which have various flavours. I don't know the real specifics, but I can outline why your two cases are different, and you can verify it visually. If you take a potato, cut it up and boil it, it stays pale. The texture changes to become much ...


18

Onions The more you cook an onion, the sweeter it is going to get; heat breaks down the volatiles and complex starches and converts them to sugars. When an onion is completely brown then it is basically caramelized. The point of sweating onions is to draw out some of the pungency, but not all. If you cook them 'til they're brown (caramelized) then they ...


17

The choice of one onion over another is really going to come down to personal preference based on color and flavor. Red and white onions are usually milder in flavor than yellow onions which is the reason they're often the choice for hamburgers and sandwiches. Yellow (sometimes referred to as "Spanish") onions tend to have a more pungent flavor. Sweet ...


15

I understand the intent of the advice to always keep meat and vegetable preparation tools and areas separate is to establish a habit, to avoid the possibility of cross contamination in cases where you are not going to be cooking the vegetables as much or at all; and similarly in a catering environment to be able to visibly demonstrate that working practices ...


15

It isn't really "absorbed" by the boiling water; more precisely, it is leached into the water. As kiamlaluno said, Vitamin C is water soluble. An important thing to note is that the leaching of vitamin C into water, by itself, doesn't destroy the vitamin C. It's still there; it's just in the water rather than the vegetable. If you consume the liquid you ...


14

This just means the potato has been exposed to light and has produced chlorophyll (the green color). It is most likely safe to eat, minus the green areas. Producing the chlorophyll also produces solanine, which is toxic in large quantities. Remove the green parts and don't eat more than 4lbs. For detailed information, see this link. ...


14

Typically veggies are onions, carrots, celery, leeks, garlic, shallots, etc. Throw in some peppercorns, also, and a Bouquet garni. You can add most other veggies, too, and mushrooms, but avoid adding things that give a strong (bad) flavour after cooked for a long time (broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, etc.).


14

Just slice it into thin discs (a mandoline is quick) and the kids use it as chips'n'dip. Try some natural or Greek style yoghurt and whole seed mustard as a dip. Very crunchy and tasty If the skin is dry or blotchy I quickly run the potato peeler over it first Otherwise, just grating it into soups or stews is a nice vegetable filler EDIT Doh, forgot the ...


14

The crisper provides a somewhat enclosed environment, which prevents moisture from escaping as rapidly. Vegetables keep best at a certain humidity, higher than that typically found in the rest of the fridge, but not so high that condensation starts accumulating on them. Vegetables kept in too-dry air in the rest of the fridge will tend to dry out and shrivel ...


13

Actually, yams are often white, and may be purple or other colors.. In the US, what we get labeled as yams are actually sweet pototoes. (They were similar to the african yams that people were used to, and the name stuck, sort of like how 'pepper' is used for chilies, but they're not even close to the same thing.) update A longer explanation of the ...


12

Lately, I've been direct grilling them fully stripped of the husk, with a brush of olive oil first. Its relatively quick, but requires a bit of attention as you'll need to turn the ears. You don't want the heat too high and it can be difficult not to dry the corn out. It produces a distinct favor but its absolutely wonderful, everybody raves. The slight ...


11

If you have a metal strainer then I Fill a large pot with water. Just enough so it almost comes up to the bottom of the strainer when you place it on top. Insert the strainer so it is balanced above the water. Fill strainer with vegetables and cover with a lid Boil Take off when the vegetables are steamed to your specifications Enjoy


11

I would do it the other way round, I'd fry the sausages first, then add the veg. This has a few benefits as I see it:- The sausages will brown more evenly, purely aesthetic but some people will think they are not cooked if they are not brown. You'll get the oil out of the sausages so you'll have a better idea of how much oil to add when you add the veg, ...


11

To prevent the vegetable from going 'off' in the freezer. From answers.com: Blanching is the scalding of vegetables in boiling water or steam. Blanching slows or stops the action of enzymes. Up until harvest time, enzymes cause vegetables to grow and mature. If vegetables are not blanched, or blanching is not long enough, the enzymes ...


11

Your chard most likely tastes bitter because chard is bitter. You can't really change that with cooking technique alone, but you can: Use older chard, which tends to be markedly less bitter than the young chard you're using; Avoid bringing out the bitterness, by cooking at lower heat; Mute any remaining bitterness with salt, which is pretty common for ...


10

you need a big pot of water to blanch small amount of vegetable, small portion at a time. theoretical background: there is gas in the immediate layer of the vegetable, which makes the vegetable appear a little bit dull. you want to drive this gas out. the color is provided by chlorophyll, which is destroyed by heat, acidity and vegetable enzymes. the ...


10

It is going to be hard to get a lot of seasoning to penetrate during steaming, though you could add some aromatics like ginger to the water if you like. A better bet is to add a flavorful sauce after serving. Chimichurri or chermoula would both be excellent with potatoes. They contain some olive oil, but even small amounts of them will make the dish much ...


10

One thing we have found that helps in adding flavor during the steaming process is to slice garlic thinly, and line the bottom of the steamer basket with the garlic. Then afterwards, toss the garlic in with the potatoes and add salt/pepper/etc. (I'd probably add paprika, onion powder, and a pinch of cayenne.) I would imagine orange or lemon peel might work ...


10

You shouldn't cook more than a few minutes, and should cool them as quickly as possible afterwards. Ideally, you'll be blanching them, and here's how: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of salt in it to a roiling boil Dump beans in, and cook for a few minutes Check that beans are fully cooked (time will vary by variety and ripeness of beans) Strain beans, ...


10

One way to do it is to render the fat from the bacon first. Once the bacon is crispy you can remove it and add the greens. Cook them down until finished and right before serving you can add the bacon crumbled. If it's served right away the bacon will be crispy. If you leave it out too long or go to re-heat the next day then they will be softened. There is no ...


10

This is not an argument you can win. Say your prepared food item is a raw carrot. Clearly carrots are safe at room temperature for weeks and months. They might get rubbery and unpleasant, but they aren't going to make you sick. You can probably even prove this. Now consider a bowl of chicken stock. Rich in both nutrients and water, bacteria are going to love ...


10

File would be style-appropriate. Fresh okra is only just now coming into season in the American south. I'm in Tennessee and most supermarkets carry fresh okra for most of the year (though it often looks quite sickly), and frozen year-round. If it's something you enjoy, you might look into growing your own, as it tastes excellent when it's fresh picked ...


10

Vegetables don't ripen. Carrots, potatoes, leafy greens, etc... They will get bigger of course and some veggies will get more bitter or woody with age. Greens will get bitter. Generally speaking veggies are better young. Carrots are particularly sweet and tender when young. Potatoes are also perfectly fine at any size. The possible exceptions would be the ...


10

According to the History of Carrots page from the World Carrot Museum: The current yellow/orange varieties (containing carotene) through gradual selection in Europe, now form the basis of the commercial cultivars around the world, mainly through their superior taste, versatility, nutritional value and cultural acceptance. It is clear that until ...



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