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No! A cup of salt is an enormous amount and would be dangerous for anyone who ate it, although they are unlikely to be able to swallow it in the first place as it would taste awful. Preserving vegetables can be done with or without preservative agents like sugar, salt, and acid but you won't be able to use your bread machine's jam making function. I would ...


2

From a practical standpoint, you won't be able to get a full cup of salt to dissolve into a "jam". The solubility of sodium chloride (table salt) is much lower than that of sucrose (sugar) and it doesn't change much with additional heat. So while you can add a (relatively) huge amount of sugar, get it to dissolve, and be left with a stable and pleasantly ...


1

Jams and jellies set up due to the presence of pectin, which is essentially the plant version of collagen/gelatin. Pectin requires sugar and acid to form a stable gel, so those ingredients are pretty much required. That's why your bread maker's instructions recommend adding lemon juice as well as sugar. It would definitely be a cool experiment to try ...


1

It is possible to preserve vegetables with salt via lactic fermentation but as GdD mentioned, 1 cup is way too much. I believe lactic fermentation is your best bet however, either dry salting or brining. If you're dry salting the maximum you'd use is 20 - 25% by weight but the vegetables would require several rinsings to get the saltiness down to a ...


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As was said before, it's not easily possible to extract the nitrate from produce. However, there are vegetables that contain more nitrate that others. You can look these up and use them for your baby's food. Be sure not to cook too one-sided, though; so your kid doesn't go without important nutrients that happen to come with nitrate-rich veggies. If you ...



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