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1

My husband, myself and my son all developed terrible sickness within 4 hours of eating lightly cooked fiddleheads. We now have been diagnosed with blood parasites which will take a good month to clear. We will never eat fiddleheads again.These were served in one of Canada's top restaurants and after contacting the restaurant were telephoned by government ...


3

After a few days, they're almost certainly still safe. Most fresh vegetables will last a few days to a week in the refrigerator. The quality might not be amazing, though. Frozen vegetables tend to get limp and soggy when they thaw; after a few days of being in the refrigerator, they might very well turn to mush once you cook them. But the chances of food ...


1

The pepper will sweat and soften the skin, making it easier to remove. I am a qualified cook but i still think the best way to make pimento is to deep fry the capsicum as the skin burns v before the flesh over cooks, making for firmer and fresher tasting pimento. That means you have more opportunity to cook it further in another dish before it turns ...


5

It causes the pepper to steam a bit, making it easier to remove the charred skin. (resting might also be a factor ... I've never done a side-by-side comparison of covered vs. uncovered)


4

While I agree that these types of warnings are conservative and partially CYA, I would suggest that they not be dismissed. What needs to be understood is that there are other factors involved past the production method. Even if a mfr./producer observes and maintains the highest quality standards in their production facility, they have no control over how ...


-1

There is the possibility that your spinach was harvested from a particularly filthy field. If it was harvested anyplace in the "first world" (check the label), I would dismiss the warning. Other than that possibility, what you have there is a warning so overly conservative that it serves to undermine any credibility that the governing body ever had. In my ...


0

Vitamin C is not lost, there is no magic happening, it is just consumed by cells trying to protect themselves from dying You typically see a 50% reduction within 7 days, and then the loss rate reduces as the cellular processes stop For many vegetables the loss rate is much less if kept chilled. Most food books that publish vitamin C levels do so at X days ...


1

This is a difficult question, as there are many different varieties of corn on the cob -- the stuff sold in the United States is typically significantly sweeter than that grown in Europe. Once cut, corn starts a process that will convert its sugars to starch. To make store-bought corn taste like fresh cut corn, they've specifically bred corn varieties that ...


-1

Food preservatives such as nitrite, sorbic acid, phenolic antioxidants, polyphosphates, and ascorbates are all proven additives to help reduce the risk. phenolic antioxidants in particular come from plant materials. If I were you, I would invest my time into researching such ingredients as bay leafs because you can buy them in bulk and because they're food ...


1

I suppose dropping the bags in liquid nitrogen for a few minutes, and then storing in the freezer might suffice. mostly fish, but not a bad read: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/UCM252416.pdf Edit post clarification of the question: Liquid nitrogen is still fun if you can find an excuse, and highly effective. In a less drastic ...



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