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You Can Add Flavour to The food being Steamed. For example Steaming Mussels in Beer or wine you can also add thing to the bottom steaming pot such as blue cheese onions pepper, and those flavours will end up in the mussels in the top. and some of the Mussel flavour ends up in the bottom pot which happens to make a very nice soup.


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To put it simply, it's lost exceedingly rapidly. Can we scientifically measure the exact amount of the reduced form of vitamin C in produce over time? Yes, we can. Have there been studies and papers published that have done this? Yes, there have been. Are these results relevant? Yes and no. These results allow us to draw certain conclusions about the loss* ...


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Rinsing vegetables doesn't really "decontaminate" them, whether you're using running water or not. The main purpose of rinsing vegetables is to remove dirt and grit that would make them unpalatable to eat, it doesn't actually make them that much safer to eat. If a vegetable was somehow contaminated with salmonella before rinsing, it would still be ...


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The purple skin sweet potatoes generally takes shorter time to boil in water that the white skin ones. You will find that it takes roughly the same amount of times as the golden skin potatoes which is roughly 15 minutes. They generally always becomes mushy once cooked by boiling. If you intend to pan fried or grill it, just let it boil for about 10 ...


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This question is actually answered in a comment to the recipe you linked: kimberly says: Sorry for silly question, but the ingredient list says ” ½ sleeve celery $0.65 “. do you mean 1/2 of a stalk or 1/2 of a bunch of celery? [...] Beth M says: Yes, I meant a half bunch. Sorry about the confusion! :) I used about 4 stalks or so. ...


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My best guess is that the recipe is referring to the bag ("sleeve") that a whole celery heart comes in. Half a celery heart (about 6-8 stalks?) seems to be on par with the volume of 4 medium carrots. Here's a Save-A-Lot grocery store listing for "sleeve celery", and the picture is of a celery heart.


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As in the answer and comments already posted, location, growing conditions, etc. all play a part. But one of the most important things to keep in mind is that there are many varieties of each type of produce. Most often, in recipes, you are not provided with varietal information. So you have no way of knowing which variety may have been used and this can ...


4

The size of the veggies can be due to location only to an extent. If their seasons are longer for cultivation to harvest then the plants may experience better growth. Other factors can also contribute. The use of fertilizer for example, or if using hormones and pesticides, etc... all effect the outcome in size, quality, taste and possibly even firmness or ...


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A couple things... Yes the microwaves excite polar molecules. Water happens to be a very common polar molecule. So the first thing I would expect would make a major difference would be the ratio of polar to non-polar molecules or the percentage of water in most cases. Asparagus has a high percentage of water at roughly 93%. Peas on the other hand have about ...


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This may guide you a bit. Tl;dr - It recommends reusing brines only for fridge pickles. Since you have already heated up yours to make your original batch, heating it again (and processing it) may change the acidity and make it not shelf-stable. Since there were no vegetables placed in it, it may not have changed the acidity that much, but better safe ...


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There's a chance the extra sugar from the blueberries has helped bring the peppery taste from the kale out a bit more. Kale is known for its light peppery flavor much like watercress but not any where near the heat of horseradish. The addition of sugar, much like salt is great for intensifying flavors. Rather than try and describe the taste of kale myself, ...


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Have you considered using a griddle pan instead of a frying pan? That way there will be no need for oil, you'll get a nice stripped effect and no specks all over your food. Otherwise, whats wrong with cleaning the pan between each use? There's only 2 pans in my kitchen that don't get washed after each use. That's my griddle and my fried egg pan. Or in-fact ...


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How much spinach is in a cup varies widely based on who is doing the measuring, how well the spinach is trimmed, whether it is chopped, the size of the leaves, whether it is cooked, and if it is cooked, how well it is drained. That said, the FDA calls 1 cup of raw spinach 30 grams. If you're looking for the number of leaves in a cup, that can't be answered ...


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I've never worked in a commercial kitchen, so it's quite possible that this might not be considered acceptable from a safety point of view. Keep the pan on a flame lower than what you'll need for cooking. (so it's not so hot that things will scorch as soon as you add the food, but warm enough to keep from needing so long to pre-heat the pan. Another ...


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The trick to keep vegetable nutrient, is by maintaining the right size of your vegetable. Big Size vegetable for long simmer, Medium size cut for medium simmer, and small cut for short simmer.



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