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You can get Charlotte or Desiree potatoes at Waitrose in the UK, both of which are waxy and will hold their structure well when cooked.


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As a rule, potatoes that are colored (red, gold, blue) tend to be waxier than white potatoes (red being the waxiest), and fingerling potatoes are the waxier than other sizes. A more complete list can be found here.


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I typically chop up the white and green parts of the green onion, and add them at different times during cooking: I'll add the white part fairly early in the cooking. (not as early as I would with bulb onions, as I cut the green onions more finely). I want them to cook for a minute or two to take out the harshest flavors, but not cook too much. I ...


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I was wondering if this should be closed as too broad or unclear, or answered. I'll attempt an answer. The information you are looking for doesn't exist. First, there are no common factors which make all and any food tasty. Second, the factors which make most foods tasty have nothing to do with absorption, and in fact most foods do not absorb anything at ...


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Beets last ages if stored in cool conditions; if it isn't moldy and is still hard like a rock and not squishy, it should be completely safe. If it is a gigantic beet, it's possible it might be woody, but that's a separate question from whether it is safe. I agree with @user33210; baking beets is definitely the best way of cooking them and brings out their ...


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I would try to keep the vegetable whole as long as possible. Cut them up in manageable size chunks instead of blending them (except for the tomatoes and leaf vegetables). When wanting to make a smoothy, just pick some pre-cut vegetables and throw them in the blender. You could also par-boil most of the veggies and freeze them up. If wanting to blend them ...


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Try peeling the asparagus. This would work better with thicker asparagus. Since the outer skin of asparagus is so smooth, I can see how glaze would just slip off. Peeled asparagus will have a slightly stickier surface for the glaze to hold on to. An added bonus is that some of the glaze should penetrate if the asparagus is peeled. Be aware that peeled ...


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I learned a little trick for this while living in Italy. When you are cooking the spinach, add a bit of milk or heavy cream, just enough to coat it lightly and cook off. I use about 2 tbsp for about 6 oz of raw spinach. Alternatively, I have soaked spinach in milky water before cooking. Rather than patting it dray or straining it, I use tongs to pull the ...


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In response to your question, carrots are not dyed. (Unless of course you are talking about the mini frosting carrots on carrot cakes) Regular carrots, however contain a natural pigment known as carotene which is also found in humans to some degree. This carotene is naturally orange leading to the color of carrots. Technically speaking, if you ingest enough ...


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Carrots are dyed, they contain lots of different dyes! However they dye themselves as part of the gowning process. This has been increased by plant breeders over the years. So all carrots have been genetically modified, but by farmers in muddy boots, not by "evil" people in labs....


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Having experimented with an air fryer I think it's an alternative to stir frying, but not a particularly good one. An air fryer is basically a device that blows hot air on food as it slowly stirs it around. It seems to work ok as long as the vegetables are hard, if they get a bit soft and sloppy (think cooked zucchini, eggplant) they do not stir effectively ...


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Carrots are not dyed, but they are orange because of a substance (Carotene C40Hx) in them that is actually named after carrots. Many other orange foods get their orange color from Carotene.


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The other answers did not mention the packaging. Carrots that come in bags (like baby carrots) often have an orange grid pattern painted on the bag. This makes the carrots look significantly more orange than their non-bagged counterparts.


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I will relate my personal process as it relates to the "less salty" comment, though it may or may not reflect the actual process at your restaurants... I buy Kalamata olives (pitted) in 2 kg "kegs" since it seems to be the only way to get them at a reasonable price. They are packed in brine, and are quite salty - they keep fine unopened at room temperature, ...


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Probably not. Carrots naturally (or due to selective breeding) come in an extremely wide variety of colors from white to yellow to orange to red/pink to purple. It's likely that you were simply looking at two different varieties, one of which was more pale than the other. click image for source Even the color being only "skin deep" isn't necessarily a ...


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It's probably not anything so sinister. Even typical orange carrots do vary somewhat in hue. And as with many other vegetables, "heirloom" varieties of carrot have started to make a bit of a comeback in the US. As you can see here there's a wide variation in color among these heirloom versions; they can range from very pale, almost white to brilliant ...


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Carrots come in lots of colors from pure white, yellow, orange up to and even including deep purple. They are not dyed.


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In comments you note that you last bought a jar of green, pitted olives in brine. Those tend to be much saltier than the versions served as a mezze in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern restaurants, in part because the restaurant versions are usually whole and thus have less surface contact with the storage brine. They're also fresher; restaurants that go ...


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Assuming that you are buying from supermarket shelves,(and not, say, from olive bars that some supermarkets have) there is a quality difference between shelf-stable canned and jarred olives vs. olives available in olive bars like Whole foods or in a Mediterranean deli. These come oil cured or submerged in water, and cannot be stored for long term, and they ...



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