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4

it turns out tough and dry when I tried to braise it, and the longer I cooked the tougher it was Then it is impossible to achieve what you want. All "low and slow" methods overcook the muscle tissue, making it tough. At the same time, they melt the collagen in the meat, turning it into lubricating gelatine. The cooked meat then consists of muscle fibres ...


2

A third option is to mince it and bake something like a venison cottage pie (you've ruled out burgers). This will have the effect of mechanically tenderising it as well as breaking it up into little pieces which won't seem as chewy. You may want to mix in a little beef mince (of the fatty kind) if you suspect the meat is rather lean (and tough venison can ...


1

For getting tender meat, you typically have two choices -- Low and slow cooking Hot and fast cooking (ie, a quick sear, left rare or medium rare) Option 1 is best when there's lots of fat, which is rarely the case in game meat. Option 2 is a problem for unknown game meat, as without knowing what animal it is, we don't know what the risk of parasites ...


1

As one who has harvested a fair number of deer over the years, I have determined that in order to lessen the "gaminess" taste of venison, marinating it no longer than overnight in a solution of wine (any cheap version will work) and a small amount of fruit juice like lime, lemon or even oranges, works. Just don't add too much and thin out the wine with some ...



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