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21

No, it's not. White vinegar (also known as distilled vinegar) is made of acetic acid diluted in distilled water. Its flavor is simple—its just sour. Typical concentrations range from 5–7% acetic acid. White wine vinegar is made by allowing white wine to turn to vinegar. It has a much more complex flavor profile. It is also frequently less sour (acidic) than ...


17

Vinegar and salt both help the proteins (albumin) to denature (unwind) more quickly and link up to form a network of proteins, thus setting the egg. The quicker the proteins denature the less feathering there will be around the edges and the nicer looking the egg.


14

The ones I always have: White vinegar (as a condiment, and also for cleaning); Balsamic vinegar (mainly for salads - let it age!) Rice vinegar (essential to almost all Asian cooking); Red wine vinegar (essential in French and a lot of Italian cooking); Cider vinegar (the best deglazer, and great in chilis)


12

Egg whites need to be heated up to a certain temperature in order to coagulate ("set"). Lowering the pH (increasing the acidity) of the cooking liquid is one way to lower the temperature required for coagulation of the egg whites. So, in a way, this does prevent "feathering" of the eggs, but not because of any direct reaction; rather, the reason the eggs ...


11

If a recipe asks for "vinegar", a standard type is implied, namely white vinegar. There certainly are more vinegars than just the white and the cider one (white wine or balsamic are also often used). However, cultural differences can play a role. I've found on wikipedia that English people put malt vinegar on their fish 'n' chips. If you would see a recipe ...


10

As Michael mentioned, a shaken vinaigrette is only going to stay together primarily while you're shaking it. If it's been staying together long consider yourself lucky all the other times...this time was what should be "normal". The more particulate such as herbs, mustard, spices, etc. that you have in a vinaigrette the quicker it will emulsify and the ...


10

The advantage would be cutting some sodium out of your diet. If you are like many in the western part of the world, you probably get more than your daily allotment of sodium regularly. By making sure to cut sodium where you can, you gain the health benefits of a well-balanced diet. Since salt is a flavor enhancer, a low-sodium diet can often seem bland. ...


10

I don't think so unless it's not pure mixture of oil and vinegar as I think both of them can be stored un-frigerated independently.


9

Vinegar, in general, has distinct acidic characteristics that will affect a recipe; it's often used for this reason. For instance, in marinades, the acid is used to break down muscle fiber and help flavor penetrate. In Cevice, the acid component is used to "cook" the fish. Additionally, the different types of vinegar have different flavor characteristics. ...


9

I'd like to refer you to my answer to the question about chili in cast iron, from which I'll summarize the relevant parts: Typical cast iron corrodes at a pH lower than 4.3; pure white vinegar (5%) has a pH of 2.4 and wine is around 3.2 to 3.8. If you plan to use either of these in cast iron, you'd better make sure they are heavily diluted, otherwise you ...


9

This video of Alton Brown - Good Eats explains it way better than I ever can. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JEi4OW2Q54 If your bottle of wine turned to vinegar you probably have some "mother" at the bottom of that bottle that you can use in your next batch.


9

Vinegar is an acid. It is made from fermenting ethanol. This makes acetic acid. Much like a kid's vinegar + baking soda = volcano science project, vinegar is sometimes used in breads to help the bread rise. My mom's banana bread is one example. And the more ripe the bananas are, the less acidic they are, so you need more vinegar in her recipe. My wife's ...


9

Well, it IS vinegar. However as you probably already know, higher quality balsamic vinegar is less sour and more rich tasting than its cheaper counterpart. It's unlikely that your balsamic is spoiled--in most ways vinegar is as spoiled as it's going to get. More likely is that you've uncovered one of the issues with balsamic vinegar: Most of what you can ...


9

From a safety point of view, assuming you are keeping the vinegar in the refrigerator while soaking... I would make the conservative assumption that the water and nutrients from the onions is diluting the acidity of the vinegar, and making it a more hospital environment for pathogens. Therefore, I would think of the vinegar as a fully perishable item, ...


8

Acid promotes the leaching of lead from pottery glazes. Of course, not all glazes contain lead. The FDA claims that hardware-store lead test kits work on pottery: How can I find out if my ceramicware are safe?


8

The flavors are very different -- white wine vinegar is made from white wine, while white vinegar is made from a distilled spirit. If you had to substitute white wine vinegar, I'd go with one of the following: champagne vinegar (made from sparking wine; tends to be more mild than white wine vinegar) rice vinegar (tends to be more mild / lower acid) cider ...


7

I have never made, but I have eaten Arborio sushi, with Italian flavors and here in DC I have had latin-flavored sushi. It was all great. The Arborio sushi seemed like plain Arborio rice to me. The rice vinegar is sweet and less acid (4% versus 6%), so if you try different vinegars you may want to dilute it a bit first and then compare for sweetness. ...


7

I'm surprised you generally find that technique will produce emulsification that lasts any significant length of time. I've been know to use the jar & shake occasionally, but usually it only stays mixed for under a minute. Unless: you add mustard, like a teaspoon or so of Dijon mustard. Mustard is a powerful emulsifier and will help stabilize it. To ...


7

First choice: go out and buy any other rice vinegar - it doesn't have to be that exact brand. Almost any grocery store will have the Marukan brand, for example. Rice vinegar has a somewhat unique, mild taste that there is no exact substitute for. In a pinch, I'd maybe use 80% white vinegar 20% sherry.


7

Another reason you can use vinegar in a bread recipe - to produce a sourdough. Under traditional methods of making a sourdough bread, one keeps a 'sour' (sponge) or a piece of dough from the days previous production, which acts as a starter for the current bread. In many of todays commercial bakeries (grocery stores, etc.), sours are not kept from day to ...


7

From On Food and Cooking: Acidity in the dough - as from a sourdough culture - weakens the gluten network by increasing the number of positively charged amino acids along the protein chains, and increasing the repulsive force between chains. And weaker gluten structure is definitely a good thing for pastry doughs! From the same source: [Eggs] ...


7

I don't think there is any “standard” type of vinegar worlwide. In recipes for French dishes, an unspecified vinegar can be assumed to be a red wine vinegar. Mien seems to have a different opinion, so I'd say it's pretty much a cultural issue.


7

I am not a chef, so for me it comes down to personal preference. I love using vinegar, but like regular wine you really should pare it with what you are cooking. Yes it could be a regional thing, but again for me it comes down to simple choices. If you don’t want to add flavor you just want the punch or enhancing other flavors - Plain white (I use rice ...


7

Wine vinegar and wine are very different although are produced from the same thing. Wine vinegars are vinegars produced from fermenting wine by acetic acid bacteria which convert the ethanol in wine into acetic acid. Being a vinegar, it is much sharper than wine although like wine many flavours can be detected beyond the generic sharp lemon-like flavour, ...


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


6

It should last years. If the reduction contains just vinegar, reduced until thick. This yields a very acidic solution very high in sugar (partly caramelized, depending on how long it was cooked). Other than sugar and acetic acid, there are some polyphenols and other gunk, some aromatics, and a bit of water. There are two primary ways that food spoils: decay ...


6

If it contained a high amount of rye flour, an acid would be needed for the bread to leaven. This is because bread with lots of rye rises due to polysaccharates called "pentosans" (if i remember correctly) being sticky and holding in the carbon dioxide bubbles. With heat, an enzyme in rye called "amylase" will start eating up the pentosans, unless the ...


6

Wine will eventually turn into vinegar. So, other than having a really icky taste by itself (unless you like drinking vinegar :)), it isn't bad for your health and you can cook with it.



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