Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Wikipedia has a whole article dedicated to this question! Various possible reasons for Bond's preference are given; the last paragraph in this quote seems like the most solid explanation: "Shaken, not stirred" is a catchphrase of Ian Fleming's fictional British Secret Service agent James Bond, and his preference for how he wished his martini prepared. ...


12

Here's a report on an informally conducted taste test suggesting that there are indeed detectable differences between various vodkas: (the report does not say so, but I suspect that much like wine, whether one vodka comes out as better as another one has little to do with its price, except at the very bottom end of the price range) And, yes, there are ...


12

First, the alcohol doesn't burn off. We had a table about the percentage of alcohol left after a period of cooking, and especially in something cooked as short as a pasta sauce, there is a substantial amount left. For the longer discussion, see Cooking away alcohol. Second, alcohol is a great solvent. It can leach aromatics from spices and herbs which ...


7

Vodka by definition is a flavorless distilled alcohol, retaining any of the organoleptic properties of the grain or potato could be considered as ruining the end product. Potatoes are a good source of starch, but brewers yeast has a limited ability to break down starch into usable fuel; its preferred fuel sources are relatively simple sugars like mono and ...


6

Yes, there is a difference. Maybe there is no noticeable difference between a Moskovskaya and a Smirnoff, but there is a taste difference between a Moskovskaya and a supermakret house brand. There is an even stronger difference between a brand-name vodka and cheap unlicensed knock-offs with fraudulent tax seals. Unlike other spirits, which are expected to ...


6

From my limited (but successful) experience, here are some answers to your subjective questions: Choose peppers whose flavor you do want Avoid peppers whose flavor you do not like (I'd never infuse green bell pepper, blech!) Choose a vodka you'd want to drink (if you like cheap vodka, use it, if you like expensive vodka, use that) As far as the mechanics ...


4

Yes. We use apple jack in apple pie crust, which is a hard liquor with a sweet apple flavor. (As I recall, we took this idea from Alton Brown in an Apple Pie episode.) The apple jack provides the same benefit for flaky crust, and more apple flavor.


4

Some essences and herbs need alcohol to be extracted, but not strawberries. Extracts from berries can be made in the pressure cooker, to later turn into syrups or jellies. Here's a step-by-step photos and instructions on how to do it. http://www.hippressurecooking.com/2011/08/blackberry-italian-soda-from-your.html You could then mix the syrup with vodka, ...


3

It is a myth that premium vodkas are somehow purer than cheap vodkas. In fact, quite the opposite is true. Pure grain alcohol, or ethanol, is neither odorless nor flavorless. It actually tastes and smells just like medicinal rubbing alcohol, and it burns like hell going down. Now that is exactly what you get when you buy bargain supermarket vodka. Just ...


3

The purpose of vodka in a cream sauce is to enhance the flavor by allowing spices that are not soluble in water to dissolve into the ethanol contained in the vodka. A suitable substitute would be any mild flavored strong alcohol.


3

Crystallized (or Stem) ginger preserved in honey is a known thing. Shelf-life is supposed to be about 3 months for the homemade kind, and I'd say twice that (at a minimum) for store bought...Those are both pretty conservative. It should have been properly prepared/canned at the start, which would reduce the possibility of some nasty microbial infestation, ...


3

Storing ginger, an underground rhizome, which has a significant chance of having botulism spores present in an low-oxygen environment in honey is probably a very poor idea. The honey certainly will not be sufficiently acidic to inhibit the growth of the bacterium and the production of its toxin. I cannot guess what the precipitate you see is, but I would ...


3

It is almost certain that you do not have a gelatin in your mango infusion: gelatin is formed when an animal connective protein called collagen is hydrated at moderately high temperatures in the presence of water. Instead, what I suspect happened is that the pectin, a gelling agent present in fruits, including mangoes, has had long enough to dissolve into ...


3

Judging by the recipe posted on Serious Eats, there are about 2 tablespoons of vodka per crust. Substituting two tablespoons of rum or other liquor may be enough to lend a minimum of fragrance, but I would not expect a strong flavor. I am not sure it would be perceptible in the over all flavor balance of the complete pie with its filling. You would need ...


2

I have family in Reunion Island - one top seller of bourbon vanilla. The only vodka they have there is imported, and rhum (or rum if you prefer to spell it that way) is readily available. Personally I would recommend: 150 ml / 5 oz. of neutral alcohol (e.g. rhum, vodka, eau-de-vie) 2 beans 8 weeks (6 min) without light, occasional shake You can also use ...


2

You can definitely improve the extract by adding more vanilla beans to the bottle as well as allowing the alcohol more time to extract the vanilla essences from the beans. Most references I have seen say you need to allow at least 2 months with daily agitation to get decent extraction. You can leave the beans in the alcohol as long as you want, but the ...


2

I can't think of any downsides to adding more. The recipe I use calls for at least 8 beans per cup (more is better). Usually it's recommended to cut the beans in half and scrape out the seeds, adding both the beans and the seeds to the vodka - at least, this is what I do, and I think it probably allows more flavor to be extracted.


2

I would recommend not immersing the decanter entirely, but placing it up to the neck in hot water. This will expand the glass of the decanter slightly, but not the stopper. That might be enough to let you coax it out. The shape of your stopper is also convenient for making a little noose for it out of cord/thin rope, to allow you to get some extra ...


1

You can live without the vodka, right? Best chance is to sink the bottle in a bucket/sink of warm water and let it soak. Water often will make its way into the fitting and loosen whatever crud is holding the bits together. A little dish soap will lessen surface tension and speed the process. The warmth of the water will raise the temperature of the vodka ...


1

All vodkas are made from neutral spirits which in turn are made from any fermentable material. Neutral spirits is ethanol that is distilled above 192 proof or 96% alcohol. It is extremely difficult to distill above that with normal stills. The reason that Smirnoff wins is that it is filtered through deactivated charcoal and not carbon. Their charcoal is made ...


1

Vodka brings out some flavors from the tomatoes that can't be release with water or fat. It acts as a solvent to bring a different profile to the dish. Vodka is recommended because it usually add less other flavor than other alcohol products. If you don't want to add any other flavor, use a pure alcohol product like Everclear - or moonshine.


1

Vodka may have a flavour. In America and Europe, mass produced vodka is highly filtered so as to remove any impurities that might flavour it. This is ideal if you are going to use the vodka in a cocktail or such where the flavours are unwanted. However, in traditional vodka areas of Eastern Europe and Russia, the drink is made without filtering. Thus the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible