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19

In most dishwashers the heating elements are on the bottom only. Lightweight plastic items might melt (soften and distort, not drip away) on the bottom, but they don't mind being in the steamy environment or being sprayed with hot detergent-laced water. They are therefore only dishwasher safe on the top shelf. I've melted a plastic bowl or two in my time; ...


13

There is no problem with putting either stainless steel or non-stick pans in the dishwasher in terms of their materials. However: Non-stick pans are often better washed gently by hand without too much soap, so they retain a bit of oil. This helps them stay non-stick. You may note that a dishwashed non-stick pan is quite sticky the first time you use it ...


11

People generally wash fruit and vegetables (organic or not) to remove surface contamination ,and the bacteria it may host, from the farm and supply chain This includes soil (ground based animal faeces), compost (rotted vegetable matter), airborne dropped bird faeces, road dust (often high in animal faeces), and other surface contamination that can host ...


11

Generally, yes, to wash off any chemicals that might have been used to finish the plastics or rinse any sprue away. If you're going to be putting the dishwasher on anyway, you might as well throw them in.


8

I think that washing pre-washed greens is an issue of emotional security, if you don't trust the purveyor. As the FDA indicates: Many pre-cut, bagged, or packaged produce items like lettuce are pre-washed and ready-to-eat. If so, it will be stated on the packaging. If the package indicates that the contents are pre-washed and ready-to-eat, you can use ...


7

As I recall from all my food safety training: to properly wash your hands, wet them with warm water (at least 100 F), apply soap, scrub all over your hands and in between your fingers for 20 seconds and rinse. That should thoroughly remove the bad bacteria and any other debris clinging to your hands. That should be all you need.


7

From what I can tell it seems like you are asking whether a baking soda solution is a good solution for cleaning fruits and vegetables. The answer to that would be not really, you're wasting good baking soda. Research shows that even purpose made commercial vegetable cleaners were no better than plain water for cleaning vegetables, it's the soaking time and ...


6

Differences include: higher heat (water's had a chance to air cool before it gets higher up) higher pressure The pressure isn't as big of a deal typically (it could scrub off some finishes, but generally those items aren't marked as being 'dishwasher safe' at all. But for lighter weight items, it often means that they flip over or get thrown (possibly ...


6

The antioxidants in blueberries lie in the berries themselves, not in the pesticides residing on their skin. Washing them before freezing means that water freezes on the outside. The water crystals puncture the skins of the berries, changing the texture.


5

For baking potatoes Don't just wash them, scrub them. Otherwise you're eating dirt. No, that's not a joke. Potatoes grow in dirt, and are usually sold coated with dirt. Yes, really. Either salt them and wrap them in tin-foil, or simply bake them on a bed of salt. Dessication of the skin is important. You'll probably want to bake them longer and ...


5

Syrion has already provided some good advice, but I think I can expand it. Note: I live alone and cook for one. And there are a few pieces I use every time. I have more, but I only use them when the primary tool for a task is busy because I am making an involved recipe consisting of multiple components. Beginning cooks seldom make such recipes. So here the ...


5

This occurs pretty often with leeks as well. The procedure there is to cut open the stalks lengthwise - i.e. one cut from top to bottom along the long axis. This allows you to fan apart the layers to ease out any trapped dirt. You could do the same thing with your green onions, assuming you don't mind cutting them lengthwise. If you don't want to cut, ...


4

Depends on how you value your pans and the detergent you are using. If they are cheap and old, then toss them in the dishwasher. If they are expensive and new, it probably doesn't make sense to risk it. Lodge claims that over time the harsh detergents can cause spotting and discoloration in stainless cookware. If you are specifically using stainless and ...


4

I've been under the impression that placing pots and pans in the dishwasher will reduce their lifetime. However true that may be, in the overall lifespan of the pots or pans the difference is negligible. In my experience with non-stick pans, they will wear out from normal use before the dishwasher will wear them out. I usually replace my pans every 2 ...


3

There are three major things you can do: Use a salad spinner Dry the produce with towels (paper or cloth—something that doesn't produce lint) Let the produce sit and air dry The method you choose depends mostly on how sturdy or delicate the particular items are, and how much time you have. Salad greens are difficult to dry, mostly because it is ...


3

If you feel the urge to wash it before using, then wash it. The stress of not having washed it is not worth it. I used to work in the Adelaide Central Markets, and having seen what some people did before touching the produce, I habitually wash goods that were within reach of the public before I use them. When you've seen customers stick their hand in their ...


3

I always check around for a sale first. This applies to things like knives too. Probably my most used pieces are my wok, and my 3 sauce pots (is that the regular name?). You can stir fry, steam, deep fry in woks. And pots are good for soups, sauces, stews, curries - things that you cook for the week. Get a wok with a handle like a skillet. Pots you can ...


2

For your first few pots and pans, don't buy a set; you don't know what you like yet, and will end up with something that you don't enjoy. I'd recommend three pieces as essentials: a 12" fry pan with sloped sides that will be your "go to," day to day pan; a 4.5 qt. (or so) sauce pan, for soups and the like; and a 8" or 10" non-stick fry pan for eggs, ...


2

Answer depends on how the kim chi is made. I make it using a variant on this recipe. The protocol there is to treat the leaves with a salty brine for 4 hours, then rinse them extensively. No further salt is added in the recipe, so any salt in the final product will have osmosed into the leaves. Most of that salt won't come back out except with a prolonged ...


2

You can just bake them on an oven rack or tray, Nothing special required Drying them wont make much difference after an hour or so in the oven


2

People generally wash fruit and vegetables to remove dirt. Most of the dangerous "dirt" is post cropping The rain washes away pesticides and fertilizers. In many growing operations pesticides and fertilizers are not used after the crop has significantly sprouted anyway The main hard to remove dirt from the growing cycle is bird crap, and I an not convinced ...


2

Pesticide reduction by simply rinsing with tap water is significant, but doesn't remove everything. Of those tested 75% were removed with plain tap water. http://www.ct.gov/caes/cwp/view.asp?a=2815&q=376676 You can quickly blanch your fruit or vegetables to sanitize the outer skin. http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/freeze/blanching.html A mild vinegar solution ...


2

Materials you can put in the dishwasher Glass, both traditional and borax Glazed ceramic Vitreous ceramic (Luminarc) Silicone Stainless steel, if you don't leave it in there for days either before or after running the dishwasher. Materials you shouldn't put in the dishwasher anything with a non-stick coating aluminium and other reactive metals such ...


1

This discussion is a bit far fetched, (going for safety's sake). If by upside down you mean the 'business end' of the utensil is down and the handle up, this comes to mind: If there is a drop of contaminated water (from hands or a splash) it'll work its way to the very tip. The tip also is the last place to dry. the tip of the utensil (nearly guaranteed ...


1

Washing basil (or indeed, anything) in lukewarm water is going to do very little to remove germs; in fact, you're probably just giving them an excuse to party. Basil is easy to grow in a pot on a warm windowsill, so perhaps you could grow your own and avoid any misgivings about the hygiene aspects that way?


1

I don't see a point to doing this at all. The lemon oil may act as a mild surfactant in larger quantity. Use water and elbow-grease to clean your veggies -- you're primarily trying to remove dirt. Use of Scotch Brite-style scrubbing pads (so long as they're detergent-free) works nicely for heartier veggies like carrots and potatoes, and a vegetable brush or ...


1

I'll agree with the others on don't buy a set. I got by for years with only a hand-me down pot & skillet. (and then got a hand-me down set when my uncle died). If you don't manage to get a lot of stuff at once, you can slowly build up your own set, selecting the pieces that you'd actually use. ... or go to lots of estate auctions and yard sales to ...


1

Since you don't know which pesticide (or herbicide) was applied to your produce/fruits, you should opt for both a regular wash, and a wash with acetic acid (vinegar). Many pesticides are non-polar - meaning they're not soluble in water; therefore washing with plain water won't do much good for you.



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