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37

There's a whole, whole lot than can go into it, but a great starting place is a ratio of 17.21:1 water to coffee. That is, if you have 500 g of water, you should use 29 g of ground coffee. What the ratio really does is specify how concentrated the coffee should be. Once you've set your ratio, there are many other variables to play with to make the coffee ...


28

Water is a great solvent for polar molecules. Sugar, table salt, and other small polar molecules are water soluble. When you put them into water, you get a sugar resp. salt solution. Other molecules are not soluble in water. Most organic molecules with a carbohydrate tail are insoluble (unless they have a strongly polar active group, like the shorter ...


26

There have been plumbing systems in which the hot water was likely to have dissolved more [toxic|unsightly|unpleasant-tasting] material from the pipe walls or joints than the cold. In particular any system that uses lead-based solder, can leach minute{*}, but detectable amounts of lead into the drinking water, and the hot water is more efficient at this. In ...


23

By definition, 1 is a simmer (once the bubbles form a steady stream), 2 is a boil, and 3 is a "roiling boil."


23

Eggs are already 3/4 water anyway! By mixing in a small quantity of extra water before you cook the eggs, you are slowing down the cooking process by making more water available that has be evaporated. This keeps the cooking temperature to less than 100°C (212°F) for longer, therefore increasing the the time for the egg proteins to foam and expand before ...


22

I don't know if there's an ideal ratio since this is really about how strong you want the coffee to be. It depends on the strength of the roast you're using, the grind, and how strong you like the coffee. I generally use 2 tbs / 6 oz, but vary it to taste.


21

Some people say cold water boils faster than hot water, this is false, found here and here. One reason might be (from the first link): "Some water heaters may introduce additional sediment into the water, giving you another reason to consider starting with cold—at least, if time is not of the essence."


20

You are doing precisely the opposite of 'normal' procedure, which is to put the lid on the pan until the water starts boiling, then remove the lid (either partially or completely) to prevent boiling over. A reduction in the hob temperature will also probably be necessary, and is in any case desirable - mercilessly boiling any vegetable is rarely a good ...


16

Actually adding salt to water makes it boil slower; it increases the boiling point so it takes a little longer to get there. It actually doesn't matter what you dissolve in water (or anything else). Adding a dissolved substance elevates the boiling point and lowers the freezing point.


15

Yes, it is different. Two things happen: the dissolved oxygen boils out, and whatever mineral solids are in there become concentrated as steam evaporates.


15

Yes, water does boiler measurably faster with the lid on. The reason is simple: in order to boil, water must be heated to the boiling point (okay, that was obvious). However, while heat is being introduced at the bottom of the pot, heat is also being lost at the top of the pot, through three means: evaporative cooling, and air convection of heat away ...


14

Adding a starchy substance such as rice or noodles to boiling water increases the surface tension of the water. When it's just plain water boiling the surface tension of the water can't hold back the force of the steam rising and the bubbles burst. Starches increase this surface tension making the bubbles more elastic/pliable (essentially creating a foam), ...


14

Maybe I'm wrong, but there is no safety risk at all when boiling old water. There is however something like taste. The reason the old water is discarded is because, after boiling, it lacks oxygen and will taste stale. This is also the reason why coffee is made with 95ºC hot water, or why Moroccan tea is poured from above (to oxygenate)... So, as long as you ...


13

Hotter water leads to more caffeine release and a more bitter flavor as it cooks the leaves. If you're serious about the taste of tea, set up four cups and pour water into them: The first boiling, the next after 30 seconds, and on down. Use a cracker between each sip; the later teas should taste slightly lighter and sweeter, and the middle two especially ...


13

One important note is that while bringing water to a boil, there is first a point where a bunch of little bubbles form on the bottom of the pot. These initial bubbles are dissolved air coming out of solution as the water heats. This is not the same as a simmer, The apparent difference between a simmer and air coming out of solution is that in a simmer, the ...


13

There is a difference between a full rolling boil and a slow boil, but it's not really what you're suggesting. At a rolling boil, the water is mixing well enough that effectively it's all at 100°C. At a slow boil, it's really only boiling at the bottom, with bubbles floating up from there, so most of the water is actually a bit below 100°C. This difference ...


12

Seconds, not minutes. Just the act of pouring the water will cool it slightly. At sea-level pure water will be 100C at a full boil, the temperature will drop immediately when it's no longer being heated. This is unscientific at best, but just for giggles I put an accurate digital thermometer into a room temperature mug, and brought a couple of cups of cups ...


11

You really need to filter it first. If you wouldn't drink it, don't cook with it (also good advice re: wine). There seem to be sources on the internet regarding how to make rainwater drinkable, so I would start there. (example: http://www.rain-barrel.net/drinking-rainwater.html) If you're already drinking your rainwater, and haven't died yet, it's probably ...


11

This is generally to season the thing being boiled whilst it is cooking. The salt will infiltrate the innards of the thing being cooked infusing it with some seasoning. Try with something basic like pasta or rice to see the difference between cooking in plain water and cooking in salted water. This quesion and this one might also provide some insight.


11

There are also several reasons beyond seasoning that apply when boiling vegetables: Salted water will cause vegetables to become tender faster than plain water because it speeds the breakdown of vegetables' cell walls. Salted water will preserve the natural flavor of vegetables. Using plain water actually draws the natural salt out of the vegetables, into ...


11

As a rule of thumb- you can comfortably hold your finger in warm water. 100°F (38°C). Yeast wake up well at this temperature. http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/yeast_temp.html This time of year my house is 80°F (27°C). but I heat my water a little past that (~120°F or 50°C) to compensate for cooler ingredients- you really want the dough to be ...


11

Either buy a cheap electric kettle, or if you are really fussed about not re-boiling water then shell out a bit more for one of the single cup hot water dispensers like the Tefal Quick Cup or the Breville Hot Cup. We have both a cheap kettle and a Breville Hot Cup in our office. The kettle is good for making cups for multiple people at the same time, the ...


11

Wetted starch is not the same thing as cooked starch. If you want to see the difference in a simple experiment, make two starch slurries, boil one into a pudding, and leave the other one cold. Starch only gelates at high temperatures (I think it starts around 70°C, but needs even more to complete the process). When you have a grain of rice, you have the ...


11

When you boil water in a cup in a microwave, it will often boil without forming bubbles, because unlike a kettle with a rough heating element or inner surface, a clean ceramic cup has few nucleation points. Nucleation points allow pockets of gas to form, which become bubbles as the water boils. When you add the teabag to the hot water, you are essentially ...


11

To get fluffier eggs. When the water is heated to 100 degrees C, the water will begin to evaporate. This will in turn make lots of small holes in the egg giving fluffy eggs. Recommended amount of liquid (water or milk): 1 tbsp pr egg.


10

As long as you don't live in an area with bad acid rain, and you are catching it in a sanitary container without running it through gross gutters etc, it would be fine.


10

Turn the temperature down - Once the pot reaches boil, it takes a lot less energy to keep it boiling, turning the temperature down it will keep it from boiling quite so violently. Don't overfill your pot - Makes sure you are using a pot large enough to handle all the water and pasta A teaspoon of oil will also help - This helps keep the water from building ...


9

Start with a bean with more naturally-occurring caffeine. Colombia Excelso 1.37% Colombia Supremo 1.37% Indian Mysore 1.37% Prepare the coffee in a manner that produces the most caffeine. drip: 1 cup (7 oz, 207 ml) = 115–175 mg. brewed: 1 cup (7 oz, 207 ml) = 80–135 mg. espresso: 1 shot (1.5–2 oz, 45–60 ml) = 100 mg Taken from ...


9

Unless your hot water tank is very close to your hot water tap, this is a very energy inefficient. As Jefromi notes it would be faster to boil water in a electric kettle first, and then pour it into the pan. Put the pan on the heat at the same time if you are really in a hurry Hot water systems are normally hot enough (above 55°C, 130°F) to keep water borne ...



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