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25

Whipped cream was made for centuries before the mixer was invented. :) You can do it with simply a balloon whisk. Things that may help though: Very cold cream (not freezing) Very cold bowl and whisk (put them in the freezer for 20 minutes prior to using) Copper bowl The process is simply to start slow until you see bubbles form, then speed up until you ...


13

I don't think so. In the mayonnaise case, all that has happened is the fat has come out of emulsion and gathered together again, so you can re-emulsify it. In the whipped cream case, you've started to create large fat crystals (butter). I guess technically it might work to heat it up to melt the butter, re-emulsify it into cream and then beat it again, but I ...


12

N2O is more stable than CO2. Mixing N2O with water or cream won't create diffetent molecules. If the liquid you add N2O is not very thick (as water) the gas and liquid will separate in two. If it is thick, as with cream, the gas will get trapped in it. You can see the proccess with more detail in this question. CO2 reacts with water (H2O) making H2CO3 ...


11

Basically, cream whips better when it's cold. If cream were stored warm, the advice would be to cool the cream. Since it's already cold, the advice is to cool the equipment (as warm equipment will increase the temp of the cream). Mild science: the temperature effects the size of the bubbles that form, how fat clings to itself, whipping time, and overrun ...


10

According to wikipedia, the copper bonds to the sulfur in the egg whites, which has the effect of stabilizing the foam. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl Cookwise by Shirley Corriher says the same thing.


10

The ideal temperature for whipping cream is between 35 degrees F and 50 degrees F (1 2/3 degrees C to 10 degrees C). In order to maintain this temperature, you may want to chill your bowl and beaters in your fridge until cold, but you should be able to whip cream just fine as long as you do not let it rest once you remove it from the fridge. Above 50 ...


9

When I first got my iSi I had wildly inconsistent results, including exactly what you're describing. I'm not sure if you're just whipping cream or if you're whipping other cream-based preparations, but the most common reason for this happening is that the liquid going in isn't quite, er, liquid. Any solid particles of any kind will almost assuredly cause ...


9

The cream whipper relies on gas expansion to work. When you make whipped cream by beating, you beat fine air bubbles into the cream. The cream traps air and becomes essentially a matrix that holds those bubbles--a foam. Your gas-charged whipper does the same thing in a totally different way. When you charge the whipper with gas, there's high gas pressure ...


8

Put cream in a small plastic bag. Fill with air, twist to close. Shake.


8

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


6

A foam is just a liquid with plenty of air incorporated into it. You can incorporate air into any liquid; in order to be able to create an actual foam, however, you need to be able to incorporate the air faster than it escapes. What makes a liquid able to hold the air you're incorporating (and hence form a foam) is a foam stabilizer, also commonly called ...


6

Charging a whipper two or three times is definitely not going to make it explode; for certain lower-density preparations you're supposed to charge it twice, but even if that weren't the case, consider that one of the chargers holds only a fraction of the volume of the whipper itself (8 g, to be exact), so if the chargers don't undergo explosive decompression ...


6

Cream whippers cleaning is not difficult, but rather heavy going, as what you usually fill them with are thick liquids. But you can clean the canister with a bottle brush and then follow the tips given in this answer on cleaning flasks. You'd also have to clean the tip and the o-ring joints, but it's easy to do so with the pressure of a normal water tap. ...


6

I am expecting my whipping siphon in the mail this afternoon. They are obviously intended for creating whip cream instantly but I find that it's best to think of this contraption as a pressurized chamber which affords you many different culinary options. Using the pressure will allow you to make instant infusions of different liquids and oils. The general ...


6

Yes, this is possible but you need a high-speed blender like a Thermomix or Vitamix to do so. There's actually a recipe on the Thermomix website: http://www.ukthermomix.com/recshow.php?rec_id=29 Ingredients 250 gm unsalted butter 250 gm milk (full cream or semi-skimmed) Method Weigh butter in pieces and milk into the Thermomix bowl. ...


6

Cream does last quite a while in the fridge, especially before it's opened - it has a pretty high fat content. So you may be able to buy it when you can, and still have it around when you want it. Failing that, honestly, I think that anything you can do with milk and additives is probably not going to be nearly as good as actual whipped cream, so you might ...


6

This site explains two methods of making whipping cream from milk. The first is by manipulating store-bought milk, by adding gelatin, temperature and a lot of stirring. The second is by separating the cream out of raw milk. The site claims that the result of both methods can be used for whipped cream. A third method I sometimes use when a recipe asks for a ...


5

Yes, as mentioned previously it is beneficial to whip egg whites in copper bowls BUT it is important to note that the impact on the egg whites from the copper is primarily beneficial for applications where the final product is going to be baked. You will generally not notice any increased volume in the whipped egg whites themselve. As the whites are ...


5

The brands that used to work may have changed their formulation in response to carageenan shortages. If they use less emulsifier, a lower quality product, or different emulsifiers such as guar gum, locust bean, or xanthan gum, the stability of the whipped cream may suffer. If the cream you can get isn't stable enough, you can add unflavored gelatin to ...


5

The cream whipped by NO2 is less stable than cream whipped by a mixer, and will liquefy rather soon. If you have ever bought a cream "spray bottle", you know how the whipped product behaves. You also have to find a supply for the gas cartridges and store them somewhere. Most people don't have a problem with that, but if you are short on shelf/storage ...


5

No, it won't work. Michael's comment explains why. Whipping cream is not just fat and water mixed, it is fat and water emulsified. This is a big difference. If you had some special reason to do this on a regular basis, you could get it to work by adding emulsifiers. You can beat any fat with water and lecithine or xanthan and get a creamy result. As far ...


5

I don't know how to tell what the pressure is on a whipper, but from the results of a blocked one, I'm going to make the following suggestion for attempting to safely disarm it: You need containment. If you open the container too quickly, you're looking at a massive mess to clean up. I'd suggest possibly a cardboard box (disposible) or a large plastic ...


4

There are two levels to this question. If you are using modern whipping cream as a starting point, then the trick for a longer lasting whipped cream is stabilization. If this is some farm bought milk you are skimming the cream from, then you have the additional problem that your cream is not fatty enough. Modern creams are concentrated with a centrifuge. To ...


4

Things to check: Seal. If the seal is broken/erroded gas will be able to escape and will therefore not whip your cream - giving you a liquid. Canister (Charge) - Are you using a fresh charge (ie. NOS canister)? While it is unlikely, it is possible that you have either a dud box or it has somehow become damaged. Position - Are you holding it correctly? ...


4

http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/season1/Chocolate/ChocolateTranscript.htm As Alton describes. As you beat the cream bubbles of air get worked into the mixture. The beating makes the bubbles smaller and smaller until the fat globules touch and the mixture becomes stable. As you mentioned- if you whip it a little more then the fat will coalesce and squeeze ...


4

It depends on the preparation. I have the Creative Whip which comes with a little recipe book and not all of the recipes demand that you chill after charging. For example the "instant chocolate mousse" is really instant. The only liquid ingredient is the cream itself which is already chilled, and the gas expansion inside the canister chills it even ...


4

Are you sure that the problem with using a funnel isn't just the size of your specific funnel(s)? There are plenty of wide-mouthed funnels out there that you should probably try, if you haven't already, such as this Cuisinox: Or this Norpro: Either of those look like they'd fit into my own iSi pretty easily, but if you're sure that none of them will ...


4

Those look like air pockets - you're using an unusual whisk, perhaps it can't get enough "bite" on the stainless steel bowl to pop them, whereas the plastic bowl's texture offers enough resistance. I'd try it with a balloon whisk rather than a spiral whisk, and see if that helps. Here's a breakdown on whisks and their uses from Craftsy.


3

The principle is actually very simple to understand if you take the liquid out of the equation, and imagine that you're just charging the dispenser by itself, empty. If you remember your high school science, you should remember that: Gases, unlike liquids, are highly compressible; and A gas expands to fill its container. A whipped cream charger is a ...


3

Another option is to put the cream in a well-sealed jar (i.e. a mason jar) and shake it up and down into it reaches the desired consistency. There is a risk of over-shaking and ending up with fresh butter, but if you're paying attention you should be safe. It takes a few minutes and some arm strength, but it's not too bad.



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