Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

37

Whisk(e)y has some crazy chemistry going on inside of it, due to the complex interactions between water, alcohols, oils, esters and other compounds of various complexity. The profile of these chemicals will vary between different whiskey/whisky styles, but the overall chemistry is similar. Simple effects of dilution Adding water, or serving on the rocks, ...


8

It is about the same thing as putting A-1 on prime rib. Mixers, like cola or ginger ale, tend to mask the flavors of the whiskey, something which is understandable for an 'inferior' brand but is thought of as 'taboo' for a 'fine' blend. The drink that results from mixing your fine whiskey with the mixers is (roughly) 'the same' as if you had mixed a cheaper ...


7

Whiskey is quite high in alcohol, on the order of 40% by volume, and is not hospitable to pathogens growing. The flask is intended to hold liqueur, and so is made from or lined with a food safe material, such as food grade stainless steel (assuming you have one from a reputable manufacturer). So yes, it should be fine. Remember: when it was brewed, the ...


6

I'm answering my own question because I did a bunch of stuff from a lot of resources, and collected valuable information that more people may use in the future when coming across this post. I wanted to use household items. My flask is a stainless steel with some copper. What I actually did: Cleaned with a small amount of tap water, shaking it a little ...


6

This answer is specific to scotch whisky. In the process of making scotch whisky, distillers traditionally burn bales of dried peat moss to stop the the barley. The peat smoke produces "phenolic" compounds which give the scotch its smokey flavor. That's why smoky scotches are also called "peaty" (or have "high phenols" or "high PPM"). Phenols are highly ...


4

According to whisky lore, the best water to use is the same natural, pure spring water used in the production of the whisky itself (every distillery has its own natural water source). Unless you live near the distillery (or buy ridiculously-priced local spring waters sold by some distilleries), this is impractical. Your best bet is to use bottled natural ...


3

I too had never heard of this until I read @user5561's answer. So although it's news to me, I'm going to venture an answer. I believe the "reasoning" is as follows: The overall taste of the whisky will be comprised of the flavour of the water, the flavour compounds generated by the fermentation and distillation, and finally the flavour generated by ...


3

Steradent tablets are best for cleaning any type of flask in my experience.


3

There are a number of flask and bottle brushes available online that will help with this task. I also found this set of instructions at ehow that recommends the use of boiling water and distilled white vinegar. Unlike most cleaning products, white vinegar will not leave a lingering scent in the flask.


3

Is the flask actually stainless, or merely something that's been plated bright and shiny? I'd go w vigorously shaking some sand around inside of it, to loosen any corrosion/crud deposits. Follow that w hot water/detergent, and brushing as possible. Finally, give it a soak in Vodka/Everclear. Check to see that the rinse solvent comes out clear and without ...


3

I don't think you'd need to increase the proportion. You could, but I'd probably advise against it mostly because of sobriety concerns. It's much easier to over-serve someone with a more potent cocktail than it is a milder one - especially after the first couple. This is kind of an interesting method, and I think the key to success is the gentle heating ...


2

Putting strong spirits in the freezer should not harm them. The solubility of air gases increases at low temperature, which is why you see bubbles as it warms up. Drinks with a lower alcohol content will be affected in the freezer. There is potential to freeze water out of anything with an alcohol content of 28% or lower. Many people use the freezer to ...


2

Well, yes, mixing good whiskey with your average soft drink is going to be a waste of good whiskey, since it's likely to destroy any subtlety in the flavor. With that said, Jameson is not really a "good" whiskey. It's middle-shelf, and I like it, personally - I wouldn't mix it with cola because I'm not a huge fan of mixing whiskey with cola, but it's not a ...


2

Yes, it is true. By 'a bit of water' one means 'a few drops'. Too much water is not good. The adding of the water starts a process that enhances the odor and makes the flavor a bit milder. It also makes the subtler flavors more noticeable, by diluting the stronger ones. If you add too much water (or ice), assuming the temperature of the water is below that ...


1

I have always had a lot of success using uncooked rice as an abrasive and a dish soap/hot water combo. Shake it like crazy and it's clean. It's a safe, simple, and effective method.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible