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20

It comes from two different measurements, typical wine bottle size, and government alcohol regulations Typical wine bottles are 750 ml, and this divides exactly into five or six servings of 150 or 125 ml (thanks peter). So many traditional wine glass serves are "exactly" 150 or 125 ml (~5 or 4 oz) depending in which country you live in For typical ...


18

As a corollary to the excellent advice from Aaronut, there is an important rule of thumb when selecting a wine to cook with: If you wouldn't drink it, don't cook with it.


18

If a wine maker loves their wine, and their customers, they will use screw caps. All the studies have come back positive for screw caps. See screw cap initiative for starters. Some main points are: Corks taint the wine Corks, real or synthetic, have a very high failure rate. Screw caps are basically 100% effective (maybe too effective) Wine ages better ...


14

There is no trick, it just won't work. Synthetic corks are popular as replacements to cork not only because they are cheaper, but more effective at preserving wine as they don't dry out, and they expand more in the neck keeping a tighter seal. This makes it more difficult, if not impossible, to get them back in. The simple and easy solution is to buy ...


12

The quickest way to get rid of leftover wine is to think of it as flavoured water. In many if not most recipes that call for water - especially stovetop recipes like sauces and stews - you can simply substitute wine for the water or stock that the recipe normally calls for. We actually had a similar question recently: In what kind of recipes can I ...


10

It absolutely does matter, as all of the different varietals have their own very distinctive tastes. However, there's not really any "correct" wine to use when you see a recipe requesting it. Probably the most common ones (where I'm from) are Cabernet Sauvignon for red and Chardonnay for white, but those are definitely not the only kinds you can use, and ...


10

For white wine, try: chicken broth/stock vegetable stock white grape juice ginger ale canned mushroom liquid diluted white wine or cider vinegar For red wine, try: beef or chicken broth/stock diluted red wine vinegar red grape juice tomato juice canned mushroom liquid A great list of substitutions for cooking with various alcoholic ingredients may be ...


10

White wine in tomato sauces adds: Some acidity, but tomatoes are quite acidic as well A touch of fruitiness and flavor Alcohol, which does not all cook off, which can enhance the perception of the dish due to some flavor molecules being alcohol soluble, especially in tomatoes Since you are avoiding alcohol itself, some of the options you might use are: ...


10

This seems to be a myth based on the idea that wine can be 'bruised' by popping the cork or handling the bottle roughly. 'Dr Vinny', Wine Spectator Magazine's advice expert, has this to say on the subject: Someone asked whether or not making a cork "pop" when you pull it will bruise the wine. Others have also asked about bruising in relation to ...


9

I'd like to refer you to my answer to the question about chili in cast iron, from which I'll summarize the relevant parts: Typical cast iron corrodes at a pH lower than 4.3; pure white vinegar (5%) has a pH of 2.4 and wine is around 3.2 to 3.8. If you plan to use either of these in cast iron, you'd better make sure they are heavily diluted, otherwise you ...


9

You could check whether a wine is carbonated which should be indicated on the label (it's one of the processes to produce wine). If it's not indicated on the label, then it's normally a young wine. The way to get rid of the off flavour is very simple: wait! A glass of evil smelling, lightly carbonated, wine can become a very nice drink if left to breathe. ...


9

As a beer brewer, I'm pretty concerned with fizz ;) Since the below may be a little tl;dr, the short answer to your question is, "I don't think so." This is actually the first time I've heard of the metal spoon "trick", so I can't directly comment on that, but I'll share a little of what I know about carbonation. Carbonation is carbon dioxide (CO2) that ...


9

An oenologist (a wine expert), once told me that for young wines, artificial corks (and probably screw caps) are perfectly alright. Young wines should be consumed within a year or two. However, for aged wines, he'd stick with natural cork, because cork lets the wine breathe, letting the wine mature further inside the bottle. The debate around synthetic ...


8

According to Spanish winemaker guru the Marqués de Griñón, you can safely warm a bottle of wine to serving temperature (12ºC-14ºC). Put the microwave at high for two seconds for every ºC you want to raise the temperature. Also here Edit: I looked up the reference in his book. It says to heat a bottle out of the fridge (where stored after opening) in the ...


8

As baka has said, more volatile components of the wine will be released with more wine surface exposed. Also, this not only releases aroma but also helps the wine to "breathe" and oxidize, which is why you open the red wine bottle half an hour before serving it (so that this process starts), and why you might pour the wine into a decanter. This process ...


8

I can think of more than a few reasons... Wine is (relatively) expensive. Stock is normally supposed to be very inexpensive to make, using ingredients that you'd normally just throw out (bones, necks, etc.) Frugality is not the only reason to make a stock, but it seems like a waste of perfectly good wine. Stock gets to simmer for many, many hours. A lot of ...


8

The best nonalcoholic substitution that I can think of for a ruby-style port would be pomegranate or black cherry juice, something not from concentrate. The POM brand is readily available, at least in my local market. You may want to thicken this a little to help mimic the silky texture of a port. I'd recommend starting with about 12 liquid oz, bringing ...


7

The trick is that you won't want it to oxidize (although, red wine needs to 'breathe' to reduce some of the tannins, which is why @DanielBingham said it might improve.) So, if you just need to hold it for a few days, store the bottle upright (minimize surface area exposed to air), and not on the door of the fridge -- it'll get jostled and mix air into it. ...


7

Wine is excellent for deglazing a pan and making a pan sauce. Basically, if you a have a pan with any fond on its bottom, like a pan where you have sautèed meat or even onions, you can just add the wine (don't turn off the heat yet, just lower it), scrub vigorously the bottom of the pan until all the fond has dissolved in the wine, then let it reduce a bit ...


7

Wine vinegar and wine are very different although are produced from the same thing. Wine vinegars are vinegars produced from fermenting wine by acetic acid bacteria which convert the ethanol in wine into acetic acid. Being a vinegar, it is much sharper than wine although like wine many flavours can be detected beyond the generic sharp lemon-like flavour, ...


7

Keep your wines between 45-65 oF (7-18 oC). Wine that is too hot will age faster and frozen wine can expand and push out corks or shatter bottles. Keep the temperature relatively consistent: avoid large swings in temperature. Keep the wine out of UV light (sunlight and some types of fluorescent light) which will age the wines faster. Humidity levels ...


7

I recently had exactly the same challenge with Lasagna Bolognese. I substituted white balsamic vinegar diluted 50/50 with water for the wine. The final sauce was actually superior to the sauce I had just made a few days prior with the same recipe but using wine.


7

Please do not use a cooking wine. Those are awful. Pick a juice, any juice. I'd say cranberry. You probably don't want anything too sweet.


6

Opened wine spoils fast. Red wine lasts about 1 day, white wine lasts about 3 days. You can prolong this slightly by putting it in the refrigerator, but only by a few days at most, and it depends on the wine. It may be "safe" to consume for much longer, but the taste will be way off, even for cooking purposes. If you've opened it - finish it. ASAP. ...


6

I tried freezing leftover wine many years ago, and it does work. You can just freeze it in the original bottle. The flavors are somewhat muted compared to the same wine unfrozen. Not recommended for drinking the wine, but it is acceptable for cooking purposes.


6

Red Burgundy wine is made from Pinot noir grapes, so a Pinor noir from another region probably will work well. Wikipedia describes Pinot noir as “light to medium body with an aroma reminiscent of black cherry, raspberry or currant”, so any wine with those characteristics, such as a light Zinfandel or Shiraz/Syrah will be similarly substitutable.


6

I've successfully frozen leftover wine and then later used it in stews. I've never tried it with "cooking wine" though, because, I prefer to only cook with wine that I'd actually drink.


6

Wine will eventually turn into vinegar. So, other than having a really icky taste by itself (unless you like drinking vinegar :)), it isn't bad for your health and you can cook with it.


6

The cork is normal. Over time, some of the pigment chemicals will embed themselves in the surface of the cork, starting by the edges. To my eye, the resulting zone has a bluish brown color. For a full red, the cork will turn a brown-purple, and eventually black. All of this should have no relationship to whether the wine is still good. Some things to ...


6

Worcestershire Sauce is added where the recipe wants a fast way to develop or add savoury richness, umami. It's often used where umami would develop over time with slow careful cooking (and heavy bottomed pans). Adding this extra ingredient is a good cheat where you just want that kick without the wait.



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