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My guess is carbon steel. It's used in a variety of cooking implements, including stuff like woks and as bread pans. A quick search suggests that carbon steel is often magnetic as you report. If it is indeed carbon steel, it benefits from seasoning and ongoing love and care similar to cast iron (lest it rust or deteriorate). Many articles on this, such as ...


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Hi Leigh Anne and welcome to Seasoned Advice! First let me say that you will probably get a few different answers as many of us have different ways of handling such issues. Since you had what sounded like a pretty good amount of rust to start with, I would recommend a thorough cleaning with steel wool to ensure that you have removed all of the rust. Be sure ...


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My parents used a wok way back when to make spring rolls, but it depends on what you're using it for. A cast iron skillet will work for a lot of things, but you don't really get a deep-fry from it. It is great for quickly frying up chicken parts to finish in the oven or frying up cutlets/katsu/schnitzel. A deep sauce pan or dutch oven works well if you ...


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I had a very similar coating on the wok I bought recently. The person I bought it from explained that the coating had to be burnt off, and not scrubbed off. I put the wok on a high flame and made sure to flame the entire surface of the wok, including the sides. The coating smokes and burns, but once it is off you will find yourself with a good carbon steel ...


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It doesn't appear like a no-stick wok so its a carbon steel one. I'm concerned about the blackish colour. Normally woks don't come that black. Nevertheless, I would take an SOS pad and scrub it well but not too hard. See if some of the black comes off, if some comes off ok. If it doesn't come off with a good scrub then its on there for good. From your ...


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If you have a large amount of rust, the one thing which removes it really well is lye. Just be careful when handling it. Leave it for a while in a fairly concentrated NaOH bath, then scrub off. Proceed with seasoning as usual. We have several questions about seasoning pans and woks, this one is probably the most interesting for you: Wok preparation and ...


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@LeighAnne: Regarding the selection, maintenance, and rejuvenation of woks, I recommend that you read pp. 43-48 of The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking: Techniques and Recipes by Barbara Tropp. Detailed instructions for seasoning a wok are on page 47: . Check Worldcat.org to find a library near you that has it: ...


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I can't help with the material, but having seasoned a few woks now I find this video by Tane Chan of The Wok Shop very informative, she talks through many different material and style woks and how to get a great starter seasoning. Basic instructions are as follows: Clean wok per manufacturer instructions Rub oil onto all metal surfaces inside and out ...


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Mine was having the same problem; I suspect I didn't get the factory coating off well enough. I ended up having to go through a lot of work to strip the seasoning. I tried alternating between steel wool, and a plastic scrub pad, soap, barkeeper's friend, boiling water in it with baking soda in the water, and even wiped it down with acetone. After that I ...


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http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/06/equipment-how-to-buy-a-wok-which-wok-is-the-best.html Read this. Great advice. Woks CAN work great on an electric range. But you have to buy carbon steel, not non-stick. Don't listen to the nay sayers. It works great. Try it!!


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Could the dark color just be from the initial protective coating (generally, you're supposed to scrub new woks with water and soap before first use, to get that coating of). If the wok is fairly light, it's likely to be carbon steel, especially at this price point. Plus, cast iron, the other possibility, is, well, cast, while this wok looks like it's spun ...



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