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10

There are a couple of reasons, traditional and some functional: The home cultures where these recipes are indigenous use a wok, so many recipe authors go the same way Woks are usually made out of carbon steel, and are poor conductors of heat. This means that the strongest heat from the concentrated heat source is in the center/bottom of the wok. As you ...


7

You have overcooked the seasoning. I have done this once or twice too. Especially smooth surfaces (e.g. carbon steel) are very prone to this problem, unlike rough cast iron. What you want is not a dark layer. The layer will darken with time and start looking like usual. But on a freshly seasoned metal utensil, the layer should be yellow-brownish. The stove ...


4

There are two problems here: Not enough heat reaching the wok/food due to limited contact surface. Part of the heating element not being in contact with a cooling metal (pan/wok) and the heat reflected back at it (not escaping). This can result in a large temperature difference between the parts of the element that are in contact with the wok and parts ...


2

I can't help with the material, but having seasoned a few woks now I find this video by Tane Chan of The Wok Shop very informative, she talks through many different material and style woks and how to get a great starter seasoning. Basic instructions are as follows: Clean wok per manufacturer instructions Rub oil onto all metal surfaces inside and out ...


2

It can take years to build up a strong patina, and to smooth off your tools so they don't dig in Relax, just wash it with a plastic scourer (3M green type), oil it and heat it up on your burner (tilt the wok to reach the high sides) The damage seems mainly in the 'off' zone, so it shouldn't effect your cooking process too much The main issue is that most ...


1

It doesn't appear like a no-stick wok so its a carbon steel one. I'm concerned about the blackish colour. Normally woks don't come that black. Nevertheless, I would take an SOS pad and scrub it well but not too hard. See if some of the black comes off, if some comes off ok. If it doesn't come off with a good scrub then its on there for good. From your ...


1

Could the dark color just be from the initial protective coating (generally, you're supposed to scrub new woks with water and soap before first use, to get that coating of). If the wok is fairly light, it's likely to be carbon steel, especially at this price point. Plus, cast iron, the other possibility, is, well, cast, while this wok looks like it's spun ...


1

I have seasoned my carbon steel wok perfectly, fried eggs just slide on it's surface. Here is a tip when you finish the cooking do not wash the wok with any detergent just plain hot water, don't scrub be fairly gentle. Just put the rinsed wok back on the heat to dry it, don't wipe it dry. When you use your wok again, heat it 1st, then add oil as per the ...


1

Mine was having the same problem; I suspect I didn't get the factory coating off well enough. I ended up having to go through a lot of work to strip the seasoning. I tried alternating between steel wool, and a plastic scrub pad, soap, barkeeper's friend, boiling water in it with baking soda in the water, and even wiped it down with acetone. After that I ...



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