Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Making bread without sugar is nothing strange - I do so several times a week! The wheat flour (or whatever you're using) contains enzymes which, when you blend it with water, breaks down starch to sugars which fermenting agents such as yeast or lactobacilli can feed off. The Wikipedia page on sourdough has more info.


28

You do not need sugar to make bread. The majority of traditional, rustic breads use just 4 ingredients - water, yeast, flour, and salt. Consequently, rising times are slower (usually resulting in better flavour) and the bread goes stale quicker (hence, for example, the French practice of buying fresh bread every day). Sugar softens bread by slowing gluten ...


23

First of all- yeast is not nearly as complicated to use as your question would seem to imply. Yes it is a living organism but it is a very simple one. Active dry yeast will stay viable for years in the freezer and it is easy enough to avoid adding it to water that is too hot for it. It can be inconvenient to wait for yeast products to rise but there are two ...


23

Baking powder, especially if too great a quantity is used, adds an unpleasant flavor to a baked good. Even in an appropriate quantity it can be noticeable and it certainly doesn't do anything to enhance the flavor. Many baked goods traditionally don't use a chemical leavener at all, but instead rely on technique. Creaming butter and sugar together or ...


21

I assume, by sugar you mean sucrose. However, yeast actually prefers glucose and maltose, see nutritional requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also proofing. Luckily, we get glucose and maltose "for free" from the flour, see this article on bread chemistry: Flour naturally contains both α- and β-amylases, which between them break down some of ...


17

A non-exhaustive list of ways to get your bread to rise when it's cold includes: Just let it rise slowly over a long period of time, which does give you good flavour but requires serious patience Put it in the airing cupboard, assuming Australian houses have such things, but in the winter the hot water tank will keep it nice and warm If it's still in the ...


17

I've used yeast that was even older than yours and although the taste of the resulting bread was fine, and it foamed up properly when tested, I found I had to use about 50% more of it to get the same density of the bread. In the end, I threw it out because it was too much trouble to experiment with it every time.


16

Allowing dough to rise twice results in a finer gluten structure than allowing it to rise once. It results in a smaller crumb and prevents huge gaping airholes in your bread. The reason that you have to let it re-rise is that you just pushed all the air out with the kneading you did developing that gluten structure.


16

This recipe is listed under the section for fermentation, together with beer, wine and mead. The section starts with the sentence "Wine, beer and traditional sodas all depend on yeast to ferment sugar into alcohol and generate carbonation". I don't know enough about the history of soda to know if early sodas were alcoholic. Or rather, I am quite sure that ...


13

Expired yeast will taste less, and rise less or not at all. I believe the expiration date is a conservative estimate for yeast stored sealed at room temperature to still rise reliably. If the storage environment is better and you're willing to test before every batch, and use more yeast if necessary, I don't see why you couldn't continue to use it.


13

From Cookwise, there's a table given from Wright, Bice and Fogelberg's "The Effect of Spices on Yeast Fermentation" from Cereal Chemistry, March 1954. where amount is the grams of the given spice with 2 grams of sugar and 1 gram of yeast in 30 ml of water, and the change in yeast activity is measured in ml of gas increase in 3 hrs. Here's the section for ...


13

Salt in high concentrations can kill yeast yes. So can sugar, though salt is so much better at it. You see both are hygroscopic, meaning that they suck water out of stuff. This induces osmotic stress to the yeast cells leading eventually to cell breakdown (aka death). On lower concentrations salt will throttle the yeast fermentation producing a richer and ...


13

Everything @Jefromi says in his answer is correct--I wanted to elaborate on why it is true. In order for a yeast raised bread to work, since the yeast generates the raising gas (carbon dioxide) slowly over time, it has to stay trapped for a long time. This requires a good gluten network. The gluten network is like little rubber balloons throughout the ...


13

The existing answers already explain why yeast and baking powder won't work together. But even if they did, you wouldn't have a reason to use them. You seem to think that fluffiness depends on the amount of gas produced by the leaveners. In fact, it depends on both the gas and the ability of the dough to trap that gas. If you produce too much gas (no ...


13

Sugared bread is something mostly specific to the US. There might be a little sugar in European bread, but not much. From a personal opinion as a Belgian, I have to say that the few time I ate sugared bread (Harry's American bread), I found that it completely ruined the taste of the condiment on my bread, as well as make the bread less suitable to be used ...


12

Most bakers refer to this as a starter and it is extremely easy to keep up. You will need a plastic bag or a jar to keep it in, a cup of warm water, and some flour. You can either grow some wild yeast or add a particular strain to the growth solution depending what you are trying to do with the yeast. Once you do that, just leave it someplace warm but not ...


12

One good use for it is to amp up the flavor of vegetarian gravy. If you are making say biscuits and gravy, a tablespoon of marmite will add some umami without tasting like soy sauce. Same for a vegetarian pot pie or stew.


11

Kenji over at Serious Eats gives some of the best "pizza science" lessons on the Internet. Here's a good article on the role of yeast and fermentation in pizza dough: http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/09/the-pizza-lab-how-long-should-i-let-my-dough-cold-ferment.html In short, time and kneading cause proteins in dough to form an elastic network of ...


11

Your metal bowl sitting in your 70°F room is 70°F (at least, if its been sitting there for a bit). Your plastic bowl, or glass bowl, or ceramic bowl, or any other bowl sitting in the same room is also 70°F. They're all actually the same temperature. Now, given, when you touch the metal bowl, it feels cooler than the plastic one. This is because your finger ...


10

You might want to have a read through Why use yeast instead of baking powder? to fully understand the differences between yeast and baking powder. The short summary is that baking powder tastes bad if there's enough to taste, but it's a lot easier and faster to use. But either one provides enough leavening to do pretty much whatever you want. Given that, the ...


10

It sounds like you have Fleischman's Pizza Crust Yeast (or a no-doubt quite similar product if from another manufacturer). The relevant phrase from the Fleischman marketing web site is: Pizza Crust Yeast is specially-formulated with dough relaxers that keep the dough from pulling or snapping back when shaping it. It is intended to make it easier to ...


9

First off, you it's good to understand the difference between active dry yeast and rapid rise yeast. Active dry yeast is a larger granule of yeast in which the outer shell is composed of mostly dead cells entombing the dormant nougaty goodness inside. It has to be proofed to seperate out all the cells and rehydrate the interior active cells. Rapid rise ...


9

From what I can find, it contains 'dough relaxers' so you can shape the dough without it springing back. It also claims you don't need to let it rise, but it then tells you to bake your pizza for 30 minutes! So it essentially rises in the oven. Compare this to 'proper' dough which you let rise for a couple of hours, pull into shape and then bake in a ...


9

This is not really an answer, but rather a report on an experiment. After the discussion here I got very curious and wanted to compare what I would call a "yeast cake" (even though this is against the traditional definition, but the texture is more or less that of a spongy cake/quick bread) to the "same" cake made with baking powder. To perform the ...


8

Yes you can use 3/4 cup (180 ml) of light/dark corn syrup: You can use any of the following substitutions: 1 cup of honey 3/4 cup (180 ml) maple syrup plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar 3/4 cup (180 ml) light or dark corn syrup plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar 3/4 cup (180 ml) light molasses plus 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated ...


8

What to do A dough should be generally risen by size anyway, not by time. But it is also very forgiving, so it will probably still give you decent edible bread if you do it by time. The best way is to wait until it has doubled, no matter what the clock shows. But you insist on going by the clock, don't change the time, wait the 30 minutes. It may be ...


7

If you are talking about resting, that is for a short period, typically 10-15 minutes, covered with a damp cloth. When raising however, which takes considerably longer, what I do is set my oven at around 90 - 100 F or 30 - 40 C and put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl covered with a damp cloth. Have, with other ovens, turned the heat on briefly, ...


7

Oven spring is caused by the air pockets in the dough expanding from the heat. (Dough rises from gasses released from the yeast.) After the shaping and final rise, often times there is a light, dry "skin" over the dough. By slashing a dough before it goes into the oven, you break this skin, and the bread is able to expand. If the loaf is a "fancy loaf" and ...


7

Mix it into new batches of artisan bread. It will give you some awesome flavor. I doubt that sealed in the fridge it was able to pick up any interesting bacteria that would make it a sourdough starter but it would still be a more adventerous flavor than a young dough. You could try making bread with just this dough but I would be afraid of it being too ...


7

No, it isn't actually necessary. The yeast activates just fine with the moisture in the bread. I've been using Active Dry Yeast for years and hardly ever bother with proofing it. Proofing shows that the yeast is actually alive. If you have any doubt about it, proof it as the first thing that you do, before mixing up the other ingredients (and especially ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible