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1

Red spots in a starter are generally an indication of inedible mold; this has happened to me several times when a split of sourdough starter went bad. My first thought would be that your yeast is contaminated at the manufacturer.


2

I have to humbly disagree with SAJ14SAJ (I still have the utmost respect given the breadth of knowledge). Most of the steps you need to perform are regularly used by homebrewers and hobby mycologists to renew or isolate special strains of yeast/fungi that are otherwise unavailable. For instance, if you wanted to isolate the yeast used by Chimay to brew the ...


1

I disagree with eschewing fresh yeast. I am trying to make bread like I used to get as a kid in Northern NJ and it is pretty much impossible to get the dried yeast to provide the necessary lift. The recipe I was trying to use shows the cook Dannielle Forrester on "Baking With Julia" using Fresh yeast. I have been using starter added to the water with yeast ...


0

There maybe a work around of sorts. Don't grow the yeast but rather buy active yeast used for bread and then heat treat it to kill it and make it directly edible. There will some vitamin losses due to heat. It would be helpful if the country had a Costco store, lol, as it known for selling larger size packages.


2

Make sure your proving environment is maintaining temperature. If you are making the dough with blood temperature water then the residual heat in the dough will get the yeast going but when it cools down the yeast may cease to be active. The dough should double in size on the first prove. Also make sure your flour is proper strong flour and that the ...


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Sounds like you may have skipped the step of letting the dough rise before putting it in the fridge. We manufacture Liege waffle dough wholesale and we find that you don't even need to let it rise that much before cooking. If you make the dough, add butter, add pearls, let it rise, then you can actually cook it right away. You don't have to retard the ...


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Crumpets are tricky. I did not manage to cook one thoroughly or successfully until my third or fourth attempt, and even then they all had very brown bottoms! Even shop-bought sometimes seem to suffer the same fate. The first issue could be the recipe. You'll find a mix of unbleached plain and bread flour better. My grandmother always made crumpets with ...



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