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Found this answer earlier when I goggled how to make nutritional yeast. I haven't tried it, but plan to. According to this post, just heat regular yeast to completely kill it. Then you supposedly have nutritional yeast! (I, too, live in a country where nutritional yeast is not readily available.) ...


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Another option-- if it is available to you-- is a grocery store in an area with significant population of recent Eastern European immigrants. There was a Polish store in Ann Arbor, MI (until it closed last year) where the live yeast was available by weight (cut from a big block, of the same consistency as cake yeast).


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Nutritional yeast is commonly used in unholy amounts as a seasoning in seitan - which is an ultra-high gluten dough that, while it needs some force to leaven, is annoyingly good at trapping gas. Steam leavening alone can already become a problem. And luckily: The nutritional yeast does not leaven it. So: Doesn't leaven anything, QED.


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Well, your own link states clearly: When the yeast is ready, it is killed (deactivated) with heat and then harvested, washed, dried and packaged. So no, you can not use nutritional yeast to leaven your dough. Only live yeast manages to create CO2 bubbles as byproduct of its digestion. Many novice or careless bakers inadvertantly kill their yeast by ...


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Try a homebrewer's supply store, or ask at a local bakery if you can buy some of theirs off of them, or (even better/cheaper) you could make your own sourdough starter.


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Splenda, Honey, Molasses, Granulated or white sugar, Maple syrup, agave syrup and corn syrup all work with yeast. I've done a science fair project testing which sugar substitutes activate yeast, and these were my results:)


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To go another route -- a bit of forward planning and the use of a fridge might be another way to solve your problem, which is probably one of boredom or inconvenient timing. Instead of making bread over the course of a morning -- say, between 9am and midday -- you can make it over 24 hours in the fridge, using the cold environment to slow the yeast and ...


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I don't proof the yeast either; it goes on top of the flour, dry. I routinely heat the water to 135-140°F and combine it with salt, sugar, dry milk, and oil (this mixing lowers the temp about 5 degrees). The mixture is then poured on top of the yeast & flour, and mixing begins. I've done it this way with both active dry and instant yeast. I know this ...


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Here's a thought. I found this forum by asking that very question and then something popped into my head. The long the bread is allowed to rise (as in number of times) the more yeast is produced. The punch down does remove the air pockets so the bread isn't full of gaping holes. Does this make sense?



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