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17

Yogurt is a mesh of denatured milk protein that traps the whey. When yogurt is over-heated those proteins tighten and squeeze out the extra whey. When the protein matrix is cut it will also leak whey. To combat this add a little starch. A little cornstarch mixed into the yogurt will prevent the yogurt proteins from over-coagulating. All heated yogurt ...


17

Yogurt curdles at high temperatures. If you curdle a big lump of yogurt, breaking it up well is hard, and it doesn't taste too well. You want to end up with tiny particles evenly dispersed in the dish. So when you add it a spoon at a time, you can mix it really well before it has had time to curdle. An alternative method is to do it the other way round. ...


14

Cultured milk products rarely become unsafe. Yogurt in particular is so acidic and teaming with bacteria already that it can't really go bad per se. It will get moldy as others have said. I culture my own buttermilk, yogurt, kefir, cheese, etc. Many times they stay on the counter for days at a time. They get more and more sour (if they are the kind that ...


14

The statement "so that bacterias would have something to eat" is incorrect on several levels- including grammatically. Bacteria already have plenty to eat. There is a lot of sugar in milk. Cow's milk is 4-5% sugar. Additionally, giving the bacteria more to eat would allow them to create more acid and make the product more sour not less. The bacteria used ...


12

You are trying to add the yoghurt at too high a temperature. Let the dish cool to around 75 deg C before adding the yoghurt, and make adding the yoghurt the last thing you do before serving.


12

I think for Indian recipes you should in general look for an unstrained, set yoghurt. There are other factors that determine the final taste and texture of the yoghurt (the bacteria, the type of milk, length of fermentation, …) but you may not have much choice w.r.t. other factors than these two: Production process: Set yoghurt is yoghurt that's made the ...


12

I was sure that with all the questions and answers we have had about yogurt that this simple question must surely have already been asked. But I couldn't find it. Making yogurt is simplicity itself. The goal is to introduce heat-loving (thermophillic) bacteria to milk, keep them warm so that they munch on the lactose in the milk turning it into lactic ...


12

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


11

Greek yogurt is thicker. You can turn not-so-greek yogurt into it by letting it strain. Put cheesecloth into a colander, dump yogurt in, and allow to sit. Not too long, or you'll accidentally achieve paneer instead.


11

I guess it depends on what the substitution is for. Certainly if the butter is just for flavour, it's a reasonable substitute (I think I'd use slightly more yogurt). But 9 times out of 10, fat is the main reason the recipe is calling for butter! Yogurt cannot substitute for a fat (butter) because it has very little fat. If you lower the fat content of a ...


11

There are various bacteria that can make yogurt. They ferment milk at warm temperatures and are called "thermophilic" for that reason. These bacteria were cultivated by millenia ago. I assume by having milk accidentally spoil to something that didn't kill the starving person who ate it. Tasty thermophilic lactobacilli do exist in the wild but so do plenty ...


10

In addition to reducing the temperature of the curry, you can also: Temper the yoghurt - combine a small amount of the warm sauce to the yoghurt before adding it to the curry. This helps when adding cream, milk, or eggs to a sauce. Whisk the yoghurt - use a fork or whisk and vigorously mix the yoghurt. As the fats and proteins are emulsified in the ...


10

Your method is wrong. Look at this site. Avoid UHT (Ultra Hight Temperature) pasteurized milk. Heat the milk without the yogurt. You want the milk to reach about 90ºC for pasteurization. Keep it at 90ºC for 20 minutes. Let the milk cool down to around 40ºC before adding the yogurt. The site has more info. The reason your method isn't working is that ...


10

There are many myths surrounding yogurt making: UHT milk is bad. This is simply not true. I have made yogurt with whole fat UHT milk for years and it comes out nice and thick. In fact for the past several months I have been using a high quality whole milk powder that makes a lovely, thick yogurt. Store bought yogurt will always be thicker because of ...


9

Yogurt is a protein mesh that traps the rest of the milk components. Many of the trapped components are water soluble- in particular un-denatured albumin, residual lactose, lactic acid, and riboflavin. The water and these water soluble components are the whey. Draining off the whey makes the yogurt thicker, and sweeter as some of the acid washes away. Stir ...


9

You are correct that the milk is heated to denature the albumin so that it becomes part of the structure of the yogurt instead of washing out in the whey. When distributed through the yogurt properly this protein will not cause the clumping problems you are seeing. You shouldn't expect to make ricotta from yogurt whey- even if the milk wasn't boiled it just ...


8

UHT (Ultra High Temperature) processing kills all the pathogens in the milk, so it can be conserved for a long time. However to make yogurt you add bacteria (lactobacillus), so if there aren't other microorganism it should be even better.


8

This is not yogurt per definition, you are making a fresh cheese. You can actually use other types of milk for such a cheese, but the mouthfeel and taste will be very different and won't be as similar to yogurt. There is a large class of acid-curdled cheeses, including paneer, tvorog, quark and many others. I don't know if yours has a specific name. I know ...


7

UHT milk makes excellent yogurt. I have had it on several occasions and the texture was fantastic. Even if you don't use UHT milk it is necessary to heat the milk to denature the albumin- otherwise it stays water soluble and washes out in the whey.


7

Indian yogurt -- a brand called Desi Dahi (available in the US) is good -- will work well for what you are trying to do. Turkish or Greek yogurt may be ok as long as they are not non-fat or low fat versions. Whisk the yogurt well before adding. Also, be careful of overheating the dish after adding yogurt, because yogurt will curdle.


7

You can always make your own. I like the recipe from Show Me The Curry. The key here is to use Whole Milk as opposed to Skim or 2%.


7

Rule of thumb, dairy in the north and coconut in southern recipes. ie korma wouldn't have coconut Indian yogurt is made with whole milk. As with western recipes, balancing the fat for good mouth-feel is important: yogurt can be a good choice when a larger quantity of liquid is called for. Cream works great when a finishing splash smooths out flavors without ...


6

"Instant" coffee typically is disolved in hot water, so I'd think that just stirring it into a cold product would be less than ideal. You might try making a coffee syrup (as you're adding sugar anyway) or try steeping the instant coffee in hot milk or water first, cool it down, then mixing that into the yoghurt.


6

Greek yogurt has more fat than a "normal" yogurt, about 10%. Further an original Greek yogurt is made from sheep's milk since there aren't many cows in Greece. This might taste a bit odd for people used to cow's milk though... When buying Greek yogurt made from cow's milk I recommend you look out for the native brand ΦΑΓΕ.


6

Another difference is that Greek yoghurt has much more protein - the kind I purchase has double the protein of regular yoghurt. If you need Greek yoghurt for the thickness more than for the protein (making, for example, tzatsiki sauce), then you can strain it as bmargulies indicated. I strain yoghurt in a coffee filter, over a coffee mug. Believe it or ...


6

A curd is a transitional element obtained, once milk starts to coagulate, the other being a water substance called whey. These are separated and cheese can later be made from the curd, via the addition of other ingredients, such as rennet. Or in the case of cottage cheese and paneer, an acid. Yoghurt is a finished product, produced by by heating milk, then ...


6

To sweeten it, add your favorite sweetener: sugar, honey, agave... whatever you prefer. This is important, because sweetness will help bring out the flavor of the fruit. General advice: If you have a fruit you want in your yogurt, pick the form (chunks, pureed, mashed, juice) that you want and mix it in. The Chobani yogurts appear have a variety of these ...


6

You want the garlic flavor but not the chunks of garlic? You can crush your garlic and let it sit in a couple tablespoons of warm olive oil for a while. Remove the garlic and whisk the now-flavored oil into your sauce. Besides adding the garlic flavor, the oil will also make your sauce develop a beautiful, glossy sheen. Personally, when I make similar ...


6

The biggest reason to heat milk to almost boiling before fermenting is that it improves the texture of the yogurt. During fermentation the bacteria consume lactose and produce lactic acid which causes the milk proteins to denature and coagulate trapping most of the fat. The proteins involved are primarily the casein proteins. When this happens, there is ...


6

Lactic acid is produced by 'probiotic' bacteria breaking lactose into lactic acid. Over time, more lactose is converted, producing more byproducts, thus more sourness. The byproducts of this reaction are responsible for the distinctive flavor of yogurt. See a more complete description here: Lactic Acid Fermentation



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